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Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Ohio State Researcher Explains Your Brain on Drugs

USA (PRWEB) October 30, 2014

As reported by the The Columbus Dispatch in the article Ohio State Psychiatrist Says Drug Addicts Are No Longer the People You Love (10/27), a recent study has shown that drug addiction may be powerful enough to trump anything else—even survival. The experiment, conducted at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, focused on rats who served as “addicts.” The rats were prompted to tap a bar that sent a pleasurable signal to their brain and at one point, the rats had to cross an electrical grid to tap the bar. Every time, the rats stopped at nothing to access the bar. They did not even eat or sleep. Ultimately, each rat continued to feed its addiction until it could not live any longer. According to Dr. Brand Lander, a clinical director of addiction psychiatry, the principle of the experiment is the same despite whether an addiction is affecting rats or people—that addiction is deadly. He believes that this experiment sheds light on why it is not as easy enough for someone to ask an addict to just stop.

In his presentation of the experiment, Lander explained how addiction affects the brain, essentially making chemical changes that an addict is no longer a loved one. He notes that the part of the problem may be in those who show frustration at addicts. He further explained how the human memory works—short term memory gets converted into long term memory in the sleep—but since most addicts have sleeping issues, they do not remember when they get high. Despite the fact that the brain can improve after an addict stops using, cognitive issues will still be present. In closing, Lander noted that recovery is possible but a long path that will require attention to an addict’s physical and mental condition.

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/insight/2014/10/26/01-mind-control.html

At Harbor Village, a drug and alcohol treatment center, individualized programs have been developed by a team of medical experts to help clients achieve recovery from both drugs and alcohol. Located in Miami, Florida, the facility allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including a beautifully furnished suite complete with satellite television, over an acre of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a friendly, knowledgeable staff.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261.







Ohio State Researcher Explains Your Brain on Drugs

USA (PRWEB) October 30, 2014

As reported by the The Columbus Dispatch in the article Ohio State Psychiatrist Says Drug Addicts Are No Longer the People You Love (10/27), a recent study has shown that drug addiction may be powerful enough to trump anything else—even survival. The experiment, conducted at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, focused on rats who served as “addicts.” The rats were prompted to tap a bar that sent a pleasurable signal to their brain and at one point, the rats had to cross an electrical grid to tap the bar. Every time, the rats stopped at nothing to access the bar. They did not even eat or sleep. Ultimately, each rat continued to feed its addiction until it could not live any longer. According to Dr. Brand Lander, a clinical director of addiction psychiatry, the principle of the experiment is the same despite whether an addiction is affecting rats or people—that addiction is deadly. He believes that this experiment sheds light on why it is not as easy enough for someone to ask an addict to just stop.

In his presentation of the experiment, Lander explained how addiction affects the brain, essentially making chemical changes that an addict is no longer a loved one. He notes that the part of the problem may be in those who show frustration at addicts. He further explained how the human memory works—short term memory gets converted into long term memory in the sleep—but since most addicts have sleeping issues, they do not remember when they get high. Despite the fact that the brain can improve after an addict stops using, cognitive issues will still be present. In closing, Lander noted that recovery is possible but a long path that will require attention to an addict’s physical and mental condition.

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/insight/2014/10/26/01-mind-control.html

At Harbor Village, a drug and alcohol treatment center, individualized programs have been developed by a team of medical experts to help clients achieve recovery from both drugs and alcohol. Located in Miami, Florida, the facility allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including a beautifully furnished suite complete with satellite television, over an acre of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a friendly, knowledgeable staff.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261.







Ohio State Researcher Explains Your Brain on Drugs

USA (PRWEB) October 30, 2014

As reported by the The Columbus Dispatch in the article Ohio State Psychiatrist Says Drug Addicts Are No Longer the People You Love (10/27), a recent study has shown that drug addiction may be powerful enough to trump anything else—even survival. The experiment, conducted at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, focused on rats who served as “addicts.” The rats were prompted to tap a bar that sent a pleasurable signal to their brain and at one point, the rats had to cross an electrical grid to tap the bar. Every time, the rats stopped at nothing to access the bar. They did not even eat or sleep. Ultimately, each rat continued to feed its addiction until it could not live any longer. According to Dr. Brand Lander, a clinical director of addiction psychiatry, the principle of the experiment is the same despite whether an addiction is affecting rats or people—that addiction is deadly. He believes that this experiment sheds light on why it is not as easy enough for someone to ask an addict to just stop.

In his presentation of the experiment, Lander explained how addiction affects the brain, essentially making chemical changes that an addict is no longer a loved one. He notes that the part of the problem may be in those who show frustration at addicts. He further explained how the human memory works—short term memory gets converted into long term memory in the sleep—but since most addicts have sleeping issues, they do not remember when they get high. Despite the fact that the brain can improve after an addict stops using, cognitive issues will still be present. In closing, Lander noted that recovery is possible but a long path that will require attention to an addict’s physical and mental condition.

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/insight/2014/10/26/01-mind-control.html

At Harbor Village, a drug and alcohol treatment center, individualized programs have been developed by a team of medical experts to help clients achieve recovery from both drugs and alcohol. Located in Miami, Florida, the facility allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including a beautifully furnished suite complete with satellite television, over an acre of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a friendly, knowledgeable staff.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261.







Ohio State Researcher Explains Your Brain on Drugs

USA (PRWEB) October 30, 2014

As reported by the The Columbus Dispatch in the article Ohio State Psychiatrist Says Drug Addicts Are No Longer the People You Love (10/27), a recent study has shown that drug addiction may be powerful enough to trump anything else—even survival. The experiment, conducted at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, focused on rats who served as “addicts.” The rats were prompted to tap a bar that sent a pleasurable signal to their brain and at one point, the rats had to cross an electrical grid to tap the bar. Every time, the rats stopped at nothing to access the bar. They did not even eat or sleep. Ultimately, each rat continued to feed its addiction until it could not live any longer. According to Dr. Brand Lander, a clinical director of addiction psychiatry, the principle of the experiment is the same despite whether an addiction is affecting rats or people—that addiction is deadly. He believes that this experiment sheds light on why it is not as easy enough for someone to ask an addict to just stop.

In his presentation of the experiment, Lander explained how addiction affects the brain, essentially making chemical changes that an addict is no longer a loved one. He notes that the part of the problem may be in those who show frustration at addicts. He further explained how the human memory works—short term memory gets converted into long term memory in the sleep—but since most addicts have sleeping issues, they do not remember when they get high. Despite the fact that the brain can improve after an addict stops using, cognitive issues will still be present. In closing, Lander noted that recovery is possible but a long path that will require attention to an addict’s physical and mental condition.

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/insight/2014/10/26/01-mind-control.html

At Harbor Village, a drug and alcohol treatment center, individualized programs have been developed by a team of medical experts to help clients achieve recovery from both drugs and alcohol. Located in Miami, Florida, the facility allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including a beautifully furnished suite complete with satellite television, over an acre of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a friendly, knowledgeable staff.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261.







Ohio State Researcher Explains Your Brain on Drugs

USA (PRWEB) October 30, 2014

As reported by the The Columbus Dispatch in the article Ohio State Psychiatrist Says Drug Addicts Are No Longer the People You Love (10/27), a recent study has shown that drug addiction may be powerful enough to trump anything else—even survival. The experiment, conducted at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, focused on rats who served as “addicts.” The rats were prompted to tap a bar that sent a pleasurable signal to their brain and at one point, the rats had to cross an electrical grid to tap the bar. Every time, the rats stopped at nothing to access the bar. They did not even eat or sleep. Ultimately, each rat continued to feed its addiction until it could not live any longer. According to Dr. Brand Lander, a clinical director of addiction psychiatry, the principle of the experiment is the same despite whether an addiction is affecting rats or people—that addiction is deadly. He believes that this experiment sheds light on why it is not as easy enough for someone to ask an addict to just stop.

In his presentation of the experiment, Lander explained how addiction affects the brain, essentially making chemical changes that an addict is no longer a loved one. He notes that the part of the problem may be in those who show frustration at addicts. He further explained how the human memory works—short term memory gets converted into long term memory in the sleep—but since most addicts have sleeping issues, they do not remember when they get high. Despite the fact that the brain can improve after an addict stops using, cognitive issues will still be present. In closing, Lander noted that recovery is possible but a long path that will require attention to an addict’s physical and mental condition.

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/insight/2014/10/26/01-mind-control.html

At Harbor Village, a drug and alcohol treatment center, individualized programs have been developed by a team of medical experts to help clients achieve recovery from both drugs and alcohol. Located in Miami, Florida, the facility allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including a beautifully furnished suite complete with satellite television, over an acre of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a friendly, knowledgeable staff.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261.







Ohio State Researcher Explains Your Brain on Drugs

USA (PRWEB) October 30, 2014

As reported by the The Columbus Dispatch in the article Ohio State Psychiatrist Says Drug Addicts Are No Longer the People You Love (10/27), a recent study has shown that drug addiction may be powerful enough to trump anything else—even survival. The experiment, conducted at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, focused on rats who served as “addicts.” The rats were prompted to tap a bar that sent a pleasurable signal to their brain and at one point, the rats had to cross an electrical grid to tap the bar. Every time, the rats stopped at nothing to access the bar. They did not even eat or sleep. Ultimately, each rat continued to feed its addiction until it could not live any longer. According to Dr. Brand Lander, a clinical director of addiction psychiatry, the principle of the experiment is the same despite whether an addiction is affecting rats or people—that addiction is deadly. He believes that this experiment sheds light on why it is not as easy enough for someone to ask an addict to just stop.

In his presentation of the experiment, Lander explained how addiction affects the brain, essentially making chemical changes that an addict is no longer a loved one. He notes that the part of the problem may be in those who show frustration at addicts. He further explained how the human memory works—short term memory gets converted into long term memory in the sleep—but since most addicts have sleeping issues, they do not remember when they get high. Despite the fact that the brain can improve after an addict stops using, cognitive issues will still be present. In closing, Lander noted that recovery is possible but a long path that will require attention to an addict’s physical and mental condition.

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/insight/2014/10/26/01-mind-control.html

At Harbor Village, a drug and alcohol treatment center, individualized programs have been developed by a team of medical experts to help clients achieve recovery from both drugs and alcohol. Located in Miami, Florida, the facility allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including a beautifully furnished suite complete with satellite television, over an acre of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a friendly, knowledgeable staff.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.