Tag Archives: Reports

Consumer Reports Warns Against the Risks of Prescription and Over-The-Counter Painkillers


YONKERS, NY (PRWEB) July 31, 2014

Some pain relief medications can be as addictive as heroin and are rife with deadly side effects. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from legal pain pills and for each death, more than 30 people are admitted to an emergency room because of opioid complications. Consumer Reports has taken a close look at the dangers of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers and is calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to do more to make these drugs safer.

The full report, “Deadly Pain Pills” is featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports magazine and is available at http://www.ConsumerReports.org.

Consumer Reports looked at the deadly misconceptions associated with prescription opioids – including OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, and generic versions – narcotics that can make life more bearable for patients recovering from surgery or suffering from chronic pain or cancer. In addition, it identified the risks associated with taking too much acetaminophen, Tylenol and generic, a medication often renowned for its safety, as well as the inconsistent and sometimes confusing maximum daily amounts of the drug allowed by the FDA.

The use of opioids has skyrocketed in recent years with prescriptions climbing 300 percent in the past decade. Vicodin and other drugs containing the narcotic hydrocodone are now the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S. Used properly, opioids can ease severe short-term pain from, say, surgery or a broken bone, and manage chronic pain from an illness such as cancer. However, Consumer Reports has found that there are safer approaches such as using other prescription medications to treat certain conditions such as nerve pain, migraines and more, reserving opioids for flare-ups, or to start with a short-acting opioid.

When taken carefully and in the right amounts, acetaminophen is safe for pain relief for most people, even when used long-term. However, almost 80,000 people per year are treated in emergency rooms because they have taken too much of it; and acetaminophen is now the most common cause of liver failure in the U.S.

Consumer Reports believes the advice on acetaminophen packaging to “take only as directed” is confusing and conflicting. While the FDA has lowered the maximum per-pill dose of prescription acetaminophen, the agency has not yet taken the same step for over-the-counter (OTC) products.

And OTC acetaminophen drug-makers have very different notions of what people can take – some labels advise taking no more than 1,000 milligrams daily while others set the limit almost four times as high. And, accidentally taking too much acetaminophen is all too easy – it is the most common drug in the U.S., and is found as an ingredient in more than 600 OTC and prescription medications including allergy aids, cough and cold remedies, fever reducers, pain relievers and sleep aids.

“All of this doesn’t mean that everyone should avoid opioids and acetaminophen altogether,” says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., chief medical adviser for Consumer Reports. “There are safer ways of taking these medications and alternative options. But it does mean that the FDA should fulfill its role to protect consumers by taking strong steps to reduce the dangers, starting by reconsidering its approval of Zohydro ER and establishing consistent standards for acetaminophen.”

Consumer Reports is asking the FDA to make the pain-reliever market less confusing and safer for consumers by taking these first steps: Reconsidering the approval of Zohydro ER, a long-acting version of hydrocodone that the agency approved in December 2013 against the recommendation of its own panel of expert advisers, and to make acetaminophen standards consistent.

Consumer Reports also advises consumers to know the risks, not only of opioids and acetaminophen but also of drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and generic), naproxen (Aleve and generic) and Celebrex (currently prescribed only under its brand name, but it should be available in the future as a generic). Like its non-prescription cousins, Celebrex can pose risks to your heart and stomach when taken regularly, as millions of Americans do.

“Pain drugs can be as bad as the pain itself,” Lipman says. “So you need to know when they are really needed and how to use them safely.”

The full report, featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports and at http://www.ConsumerReports.org also features advice for safe opioid use and drug and nondrug measures to treat back pain, headaches, joint pain and sore muscles.







Consumer Reports Warns Against the Risks of Prescription and Over-The-Counter Painkillers


YONKERS, NY (PRWEB) July 31, 2014

Some pain relief medications can be as addictive as heroin and are rife with deadly side effects. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from legal pain pills and for each death, more than 30 people are admitted to an emergency room because of opioid complications. Consumer Reports has taken a close look at the dangers of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers and is calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to do more to make these drugs safer.

The full report, “Deadly Pain Pills” is featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports magazine and is available at http://www.ConsumerReports.org.

Consumer Reports looked at the deadly misconceptions associated with prescription opioids – including OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, and generic versions – narcotics that can make life more bearable for patients recovering from surgery or suffering from chronic pain or cancer. In addition, it identified the risks associated with taking too much acetaminophen, Tylenol and generic, a medication often renowned for its safety, as well as the inconsistent and sometimes confusing maximum daily amounts of the drug allowed by the FDA.

The use of opioids has skyrocketed in recent years with prescriptions climbing 300 percent in the past decade. Vicodin and other drugs containing the narcotic hydrocodone are now the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S. Used properly, opioids can ease severe short-term pain from, say, surgery or a broken bone, and manage chronic pain from an illness such as cancer. However, Consumer Reports has found that there are safer approaches such as using other prescription medications to treat certain conditions such as nerve pain, migraines and more, reserving opioids for flare-ups, or to start with a short-acting opioid.

When taken carefully and in the right amounts, acetaminophen is safe for pain relief for most people, even when used long-term. However, almost 80,000 people per year are treated in emergency rooms because they have taken too much of it; and acetaminophen is now the most common cause of liver failure in the U.S.

Consumer Reports believes the advice on acetaminophen packaging to “take only as directed” is confusing and conflicting. While the FDA has lowered the maximum per-pill dose of prescription acetaminophen, the agency has not yet taken the same step for over-the-counter (OTC) products.

And OTC acetaminophen drug-makers have very different notions of what people can take – some labels advise taking no more than 1,000 milligrams daily while others set the limit almost four times as high. And, accidentally taking too much acetaminophen is all too easy – it is the most common drug in the U.S., and is found as an ingredient in more than 600 OTC and prescription medications including allergy aids, cough and cold remedies, fever reducers, pain relievers and sleep aids.

“All of this doesn’t mean that everyone should avoid opioids and acetaminophen altogether,” says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., chief medical adviser for Consumer Reports. “There are safer ways of taking these medications and alternative options. But it does mean that the FDA should fulfill its role to protect consumers by taking strong steps to reduce the dangers, starting by reconsidering its approval of Zohydro ER and establishing consistent standards for acetaminophen.”

Consumer Reports is asking the FDA to make the pain-reliever market less confusing and safer for consumers by taking these first steps: Reconsidering the approval of Zohydro ER, a long-acting version of hydrocodone that the agency approved in December 2013 against the recommendation of its own panel of expert advisers, and to make acetaminophen standards consistent.

Consumer Reports also advises consumers to know the risks, not only of opioids and acetaminophen but also of drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and generic), naproxen (Aleve and generic) and Celebrex (currently prescribed only under its brand name, but it should be available in the future as a generic). Like its non-prescription cousins, Celebrex can pose risks to your heart and stomach when taken regularly, as millions of Americans do.

“Pain drugs can be as bad as the pain itself,” Lipman says. “So you need to know when they are really needed and how to use them safely.”

The full report, featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports and at http://www.ConsumerReports.org also features advice for safe opioid use and drug and nondrug measures to treat back pain, headaches, joint pain and sore muscles.







CDC Vital Signs Reports: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing Varies Widely Among States


Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) July 02, 2014

Health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid painkillers in 2012 – many more in some states than in others – according to a Vital Signs report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that highlights the danger of overdose. The report also has an example of a state that reversed its overdose trend.

Health care providers in the highest prescribing state, Alabama, wrote almost three times as many of these prescriptions per person as those in the lowest prescribing state, Hawaii. Most of the highest prescribing states were in the South. Previous research has shown that regional variation in use of prescriptions cannot be explained by the underlying health status of the population.

The Vital Signs report also contains a study highlighting the success of Florida in reversing prescription drug overdose trends. Results showed that after statewide legislative and enforcement actions in 2010 and 2011, the death rate from prescription drug overdose decreased 23 percent between 2010 and 2012. Florida officials had taken these actions in response to a 28 percent increase in the drug overdose death rate over the preceding years (2006-2010).

Declines in death rates in Florida for specific prescription painkillers (oxycodone, methadone, and hydrocodone) and sedatives paralleled declines in prescribing rates for those drugs. This report was based on Florida Medical Examiners Commission data from 2006 to 2012 and IMS Health National Prescription Audit data from 2008 to 2012.

“Prescription drug overdose is epidemic in the United States. All too often, and in far too many communities, the treatment is becoming the problem,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Overdose rates are higher where these drugs are prescribed more frequently. States and practices where prescribing rates are highest need to take a particularly hard look at ways to reduce the inappropriate prescription of these dangerous drugs.”

For this Vital Signs report, CDC analyzed 2012 prescribing data collected from retail pharmacies in the United States by a commercial vendor. CDC calculated prescribing rates by state for various types of opioid painkillers.

Key findings include:


Southern states – Alabama, Tennessee, and West Virginia in particular – had the most painkiller prescriptions per person.

The Northeast, especially Maine and New Hampshire, had the most prescriptions per person for long-acting/extended-release painkillers and for high-dose painkillers.

State variation was the greatest for oxymorphone (a specific type of painkiller), among all prescription painkillers. Nearly 22 times as many prescriptions were written for oxymorphone in Tennessee as were written in Minnesota.

“We know we can do better. State variation in prescribing shows us that the overprescribing of opioids can be reduced safely and feasibly,” said Daniel M. Sosin, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P., acting director of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. “Improving how opioids are prescribed will help us prevent the 46 prescription painkiller overdose deaths that occur each day in the United States.”

Previous research has shown that state variation does not necessarily translate to better health outcomes or patient satisfaction. In fact, high rates of use might produce worse outcomes.

Steps that states can take to address the overprescribing of painkillers include:

Considering ways to increase use of prescription drug monitoring programs, which are state-run databases that track prescriptions for painkillers and can help find problems in overprescribing. Impact of these programs is greater when they make data available in real time, are universal (used by all prescribers for all prescriptions for all controlled substances), and are actively managed (for example, send alerts to prescribers when problems are identified).

Considering policy options, including laws and regulation, relating to pain clinics to reduce prescribing practices that are risky to patients.

Evaluating their own data and programs and considering ways to assess their Medicaid, workers’ compensation programs, and other state-run health plans to detect and address inappropriate prescribing of painkillers.

Identifying opportunities to increase access to substance abuse treatment and considering expanding first responder access to naloxone, a drug used when people overdose.

CDC’s Injury Center works to protect the safety of everyone, every day. For more information about prescription drug overdoses, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/overdose.

Vital Signs is a CDC report that appears on the first Tuesday of the month as part of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, or MMWR. The report provides the latest data and information on key health indicators. These are cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco use, motor vehicle passenger safety, prescription drug overdose, HIV/AIDS, alcohol use, health care–associated infections, cardiovascular health, teen pregnancy, food safety and viral hepatitis.

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Millennium Treatment Group Reports on Heroin Crisis in New Jersey

Lake Worth, FL (PRWEB) September 11, 2014

New Jersey is in the midst of a full-blown heroin crisis. According to the New Jersey Attorney General, there were 449 overdose deaths from heroin and morphine in 2012, 591 deaths in 2013 and 380 deaths in the first six months of 2014.

While Millennium Treatment Group is located in Florida, people from New Jersey or any other state can receive treatment at Millennium’s drug and alcohol addiction facility, which features a certified and licensed professional team of clinicians that helps people recover from drug and alcohol addiction in a picturesque, state-of-the-art location.

Millennium Treatment Group has paid close attention to the problems in the state of New Jersey. Of the 8,300 New Jersey residents admitted to drug rehab programs for opiate addiction in 2012, more than 40 percent were younger than 25, says the New Jersey Attorney General’s office. The number of drug-related deaths in the state has skyrocketed, rising 53 percent from 2010 to 2012 with more than two-thirds of those fatalities involving prescription drug abuse.

To help combat the expanding heroin problem in New Jersey, changes were made to the state’s Prescription Monitoring Program. The program was launched in 2012 and intended to track every prescription filled for controlled dangerous substances or human growth hormone in the state. Still, participation in this program is voluntary and only 18 percent of the state’s licensed prescribers and pharmacies have agreed to participate as of Feb. 2014.

Those from New Jersey, Florida or any other part of the country who are battling heroin and opiate addiction can contact the Millennium Treatment Group for help at 1-855-522-1994 or visit http://www.millenniumtreatmentgroup.com/.

About Millennium Treatment Group:

Millennium Treatment Group is a drug addiction and alcohol detox treatment facility located near Lantana, FL. At Millennium Treatment Group, they take special pride in their facilities. They also take great care to ensure that the environment they provide will be comfortable, and as conducive to recovery as possible. They feel very strongly that a therapeutic process must take place in an environment without unnecessary pressures and distractions. Millennium Treatment Group has full-time medical doctors and clinicians on staff. Their certified and licensed team will help guide patients to a life of recovery. For more information, visit their website at http://www.millenniumtreatmentgroup.com/.







86% of Teenagers Know Someone Who Suffers from a Mental Illness, Reports Stageoflife.com


York, PA (PRWEB) April 30, 2014

To understand the relationship between teens and mental illness, StageofLife.com asked thousands of high school and college students to take its national poll about mental health issues as part of its monthly writing contests and life surveys.

The results revealed the following statistics about teenagers and mental illness:

–1 out of 2 teens state they have personally struggled with mental illness at some point in their lives.

–Depression and Anxiety ranked #1 and #2 respectively as the most common mental illness suffered by students.

–86% of teenagers say they know someone who suffers from a mental illness.

–46% of students say they have “contemplated” suicide.

–86.5% of students say that mental health issues are an “important” or “very important” topic for the country.

–84.5% of teens think that there is a negative stigma surrounding those with mental illness.

–Half of all teens say classmates and friends are mostly compassionate about those with mental illness.

–73% of high school and college students know someone who is taking medication because of a mental health issue.

Over 5,100 students visited the essay and survey page during the mental health writing prompt and over 400 teens fully answered the poll. An additional 180+ teen bloggers submitted an essay to StageofLife.com sharing their personal story will mental illness.

The winning 1st place student essay, “Fibs and Femurs for Dinner” was written by Emily Bromberg, a junior attending Long Beach High School on Long Island, NY who shared her story of struggling to stay healthy. The winning 1st place non-student essay was submitted by special education teacher, Lauren Bauer from Raleigh, NC in her story, “Alone.”

Stage of Life selected a winner from its “Short Short Story” Twitter contest, which also tied into the mental illness writing prompt. The winning Tweet came from ‏‏@sopxhia who wrote, “Depression is being trapped in my labyrinth of thoughts and having no light to guide my way through the twists of the maze.”

Winners from the writing and Twitter contests received gift cards from StageofLife.com educational corporate sponsors Applebee’s, IHOP, Papa John’s, and SpaWeek.com.

Additionally, the top 12 essay finalists received an autographed copy of a book signed by a nationally published author.

The participating authors who donated a signed book as a prize for the Stage of Life writing contest included…

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness”

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life”

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope”

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life”

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself”

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness”

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope”

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder and Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia”

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression”

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia”

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder”

StageofLife.com VP of Education, Rebecca Thiegs, said, “We gave students a safe venue to share their stories about mental illness. It is often a taboo topic, and we’re proud of the bravery of the hundreds of participating teens who submitted an essay this month.”

To read all of the essays about mental illness and download the full teen statistics report on this and other monthly writing contests and teen trends, visit StageofLife.com.

# # #

StageofLife.com is a privately funded, start-up company founded in 2009 by Joe and Eric Thiegs. The website’s mission is to change the world, one story at a time. The site welcomed its 1,000,000th visitor last year and provides an international writing community, resources, videos, statistics, and more for today’s teen, Gen X, Gen Y, and Baby Boomer generations.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Millennium Treatment Group Reports on Heroin Crisis in New Jersey

Lake Worth, FL (PRWEB) September 11, 2014

New Jersey is in the midst of a full-blown heroin crisis. According to the New Jersey Attorney General, there were 449 overdose deaths from heroin and morphine in 2012, 591 deaths in 2013 and 380 deaths in the first six months of 2014.

While Millennium Treatment Group is located in Florida, people from New Jersey or any other state can receive treatment at Millennium’s drug and alcohol addiction facility, which features a certified and licensed professional team of clinicians that helps people recover from drug and alcohol addiction in a picturesque, state-of-the-art location.

Millennium Treatment Group has paid close attention to the problems in the state of New Jersey. Of the 8,300 New Jersey residents admitted to drug rehab programs for opiate addiction in 2012, more than 40 percent were younger than 25, says the New Jersey Attorney General’s office. The number of drug-related deaths in the state has skyrocketed, rising 53 percent from 2010 to 2012 with more than two-thirds of those fatalities involving prescription drug abuse.

To help combat the expanding heroin problem in New Jersey, changes were made to the state’s Prescription Monitoring Program. The program was launched in 2012 and intended to track every prescription filled for controlled dangerous substances or human growth hormone in the state. Still, participation in this program is voluntary and only 18 percent of the state’s licensed prescribers and pharmacies have agreed to participate as of Feb. 2014.

Those from New Jersey, Florida or any other part of the country who are battling heroin and opiate addiction can contact the Millennium Treatment Group for help at 1-855-522-1994 or visit http://www.millenniumtreatmentgroup.com/.

About Millennium Treatment Group:

Millennium Treatment Group is a drug addiction and alcohol detox treatment facility located near Lantana, FL. At Millennium Treatment Group, they take special pride in their facilities. They also take great care to ensure that the environment they provide will be comfortable, and as conducive to recovery as possible. They feel very strongly that a therapeutic process must take place in an environment without unnecessary pressures and distractions. Millennium Treatment Group has full-time medical doctors and clinicians on staff. Their certified and licensed team will help guide patients to a life of recovery. For more information, visit their website at http://www.millenniumtreatmentgroup.com/.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Millennium Treatment Group Reports on Heroin Crisis in New Jersey

Lake Worth, FL (PRWEB) September 11, 2014

New Jersey is in the midst of a full-blown heroin crisis. According to the New Jersey Attorney General, there were 449 overdose deaths from heroin and morphine in 2012, 591 deaths in 2013 and 380 deaths in the first six months of 2014.

While Millennium Treatment Group is located in Florida, people from New Jersey or any other state can receive treatment at Millennium’s drug and alcohol addiction facility, which features a certified and licensed professional team of clinicians that helps people recover from drug and alcohol addiction in a picturesque, state-of-the-art location.

Millennium Treatment Group has paid close attention to the problems in the state of New Jersey. Of the 8,300 New Jersey residents admitted to drug rehab programs for opiate addiction in 2012, more than 40 percent were younger than 25, says the New Jersey Attorney General’s office. The number of drug-related deaths in the state has skyrocketed, rising 53 percent from 2010 to 2012 with more than two-thirds of those fatalities involving prescription drug abuse.

To help combat the expanding heroin problem in New Jersey, changes were made to the state’s Prescription Monitoring Program. The program was launched in 2012 and intended to track every prescription filled for controlled dangerous substances or human growth hormone in the state. Still, participation in this program is voluntary and only 18 percent of the state’s licensed prescribers and pharmacies have agreed to participate as of Feb. 2014.

Those from New Jersey, Florida or any other part of the country who are battling heroin and opiate addiction can contact the Millennium Treatment Group for help at 1-855-522-1994 or visit http://www.millenniumtreatmentgroup.com/.

About Millennium Treatment Group:

Millennium Treatment Group is a drug addiction and alcohol detox treatment facility located near Lantana, FL. At Millennium Treatment Group, they take special pride in their facilities. They also take great care to ensure that the environment they provide will be comfortable, and as conducive to recovery as possible. They feel very strongly that a therapeutic process must take place in an environment without unnecessary pressures and distractions. Millennium Treatment Group has full-time medical doctors and clinicians on staff. Their certified and licensed team will help guide patients to a life of recovery. For more information, visit their website at http://www.millenniumtreatmentgroup.com/.