Tag Archives: Releases

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AristaTek, Inc. Releases Written Brief on the Dangerous Drug Acetyl Fenatyl


Laramie, Wyoming (PRWEB) March 25, 2014

The company will make this brief available at no cost to Hazmat teams, fire departments/fire marshals, law enforcement officials or any other public safety/health professionals to assist in their preparation and response to this onslaught of overdoses. The document is available to those that request it at the Company’s web site (http://www.aristatek.com).

Acetyl Fentanyl or Acetyl Fentanyl Hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate that has been found in street drugs and is sometimes mixed with or sold as heroin. This drug is not used in any prescription medicine nor is it commercially produced. Due to this lack of commercial production, very little information is available on the substance. The brief entitled ‘Acetyl Fentanyl – A Dangerous Street Drug’ consolidates information from many public sources in an effort to inform and educate first responders and public safety/health officials that may have this drug in their communities.

The use of acetyl fentanyl hydrochloride in street drugs was first noticed by Rhode Island State Health Laboratories testing blood samples from 10 deaths by drug users that occurred between March 7, 2013 and April 11, 2013 in a small city in northern Rhode Island. By May 2013, the number of Rhode Island acetyl fentanyl deaths had increased to 14. Since that time, clusters of acetyl fentanyl deaths have been reported in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Louisiana and elsewhere.

“One of our hazmat team customers in North Carolina recently approached us asking if we knew anything about this substance,” stated Bruce King, CEO of Aristatek. “After searching and finding little reputable data on acetyl fentanyl, we dug deeper and compiled some useful information that should help these folks with planning and responding to these incidents.”

One of the revelations in the brief is that acetyl fentanyl users have posted warnings saying acetyl fentanyl does not give enough of the “euphoric high” compared with heroin and this can lead to overdoses by improperly increasing dosage. The brief also touches on the conflicting reports on the drugs potency from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and other published studies, as well as confirming that naloxone, commercially known as Narcan, is the proper antidote for an overdose, albeit sometimes in higher doses.

“We modeled this brief after the technical reference resources found in our PEAC-WMD software product by consolidating many resources into easy-to-digest topics along with public resources,” continues King. “The brief covers potency, forms and uses, symptoms of exposure, routes of exposure, lethal doses, treatment, chemistry and we even attach a full CDC brief title ‘Recommendations for Laboratory Testing for Acetyl Fentanyl and Patient Evaluation and Treatment for Overdose with Synthetic Opioid’ so the reader doesn’t have to search further for this document for reference.”

This latest technical brief from AristaTek is a follow-up to their other popular briefs titled ‘Ammonium Nitrate Estimated Blast Effects’ released in September 2013 and ‘Toxic Consequences of Smoke Plumes from Crude Oil Fires’ released in September 2014. These briefs can also be requested by visiting the company’s web site.

About AristaTek

Formed in 1999 by four chemists and engineers who conducted field scale research studies at the Nevada Test Site’s Hazmat Spill Center (HSC) mandated by the 1986 Superfund and Reauthorization Act (SARA) and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) during the 1990’s, AristaTek has become a leading provider of CBRNE and HAZMAT response and planning solutions to the civilian and military market.

PEAC-WMD™, AristaTek’s leading software product, assists in response efforts by consolidating CBRNE & HAZMAT technical reference sources and automating stand-off distance modeling and communication of incident data. The PEAC® software is the industry-standard in the CBRNE & HAZMAT response community, supporting critical CBRNE units such as the National Guard Civil Support Teams (CST), the United States Air Force (USAF) and countless civilian responders worldwide. AristaTek is a certified HUBZone business. For additional information, visit http://www.aristatek.com.

Contact

AristaTek, Inc.

C. Scott Bunning – 310-721-2108







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Narconon Arrowhead Releases New Information on Two-Step Drug-free Detoxification Process


Canadian, Oklahoma (PRWEB) March 17, 2014

Narconon Arrowhead utilizes an innovative two-phase, holistic, drug-free method of detoxification to cleanse the body of drug residuals and reduce withdrawal symptoms. They have been using their drug-free method for almost five decades and it has helped them avoid the side effects, withdrawal symptoms and the potential for abuse of the many substitute drugs that can be utilized for drug detoxification purposes. The facility is now releasing new and additional information on the process and why it is successful.

Heroin is referred to as an opiate meaning it is derived from the opium poppy and it is also an opioid which includes opiates and semi-synthetic opioids such as Vicodin (hydrocodone) or OxyContin (oxycodone). Although these semi-synthetic drugs are legal prescription painkillers, they very similar to heroin and have similar effects such as a decreased perception of pain, feelings of euphoria, potential for addiction and cause severe drug withdrawal symptoms.(1) According to the latest data by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), nearly four out of five people who recently started using heroin used prescription painkillers first. (2)

Drug withdrawal refers to the symptoms that one can experience after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease in the intake of medications or recreational drugs to which one has formed a dependence.(3) Opioid withdrawal has often been compared to having very severe flu symptoms. Opioid withdrawal symptoms include restlessness, muscle and joint aches, nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea, anxiety, sweating and chills. These symptoms are so excruciating that it makes quitting the drugs very difficult to confront.

Also, after the acute symptoms have subsided, remaining symptoms such as anxiety, depression, insomnia, cravings, low self-esteem and others can persist.(4)

Part of the trap of opioid addiction is that, although these drugs cause these severe drug withdrawal symptoms, taking more of them also alleviates those withdrawal symptoms. The addiction persists as the addict continues to use the drugs, even though their drug use may be causing detrimental consequences, to avoid the pain and suffering caused by the drug withdrawal symptoms.

Why Drug Detox is Used

Drug detoxification is used to reduce or relieve drug withdrawal symptoms while helping the addicted individual adjust to living without drug use. Detoxification may be achieved in a drug-free manner or medications can be used as a form of treatment. The biochemistry definition of detoxification is the metabolic process by which toxins are changed into less toxic or more readily excretable substances.

The latter definition is the approach taken by Narconon Arrowhead and is further explained in their book, The Truth About Becoming Addicted: The theory is that drug residuals or toxins remain in the body and sustain the addiction until they can be changed through a specialized detoxification method into less toxic substances and excreted from the body. When drugs first enter the body of a drug user, they are recognized by the body as poisons and metabolized by the organs to be eliminated. Yet, residual amounts can remain behind in fat cells and other body organs and store in the body for some time after use. These drug residuals have the potential to act as a physical level reminder that can trigger strong thoughts to use drugs in a substance abuser long after they have stopped using drugs. This is commonly referred to as a craving. These cravings can be triggered at times when a person undergoes periods of physical or emotional stress.

Narconon Arrowhead’s Approach to Physical Detox

Narconon Arrowhead approaches full physical detoxification from drugs and alcohol in a very specific two phase approach. The first phase is to get the person to stop using and dry them out so there are no physical and/or mental side effects present from coming off drugs or alcohol. Once this dry out process is completed and the individual has been seen by a medical professional and deemed physically able to proceed, they move into the next phase of Narconon Arrowhead’s detoxification process, known as the New Life Detoxification program. In this phase of detoxification, a combination of light aerobic exercise, a low heat dry sauna, and a specific nutritional regime that is designed to decrease physical and mental cravings from drugs or alcohol is used.

One addict we will call Joe for anonymity said, “After I dried out and started the sauna detoxification program, I really noticed a big difference. I finally could sleep again, my body aches went away, I wasn’t so anxious, I started eating better and pretty soon I was feeling more and more normal. My energy also started to come back and my body and skin looked and felt like it used to when I was younger. And, this was all done by getting all the toxins and drugs out of my body rather than by putting more in. It was truly amazing!”

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends better access to substance abuse treatment, stating that effective, accessible substance abuse treatment programs could reduce overdose among people struggling with dependence and addiction and they encourage states to increase access to these important programs.

For more information on Narconon Arrowhead’s effective detoxification method for opiate addiction, please visit their site at http://www.narcononarrowhead.org or call 800-468-6933.

1.    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opiate

2.    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/2k13/DataReview/DR006/nonmedical-pain-reliever-use-2013.htm

3.    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_withdrawal

4.    http://www.opiateaddictionresource.com/addiction/opioid_withdrawal







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Following Wall Street Journal Report on Birth Injury From Prescription Medications, RX Birth Defects Releases New Resources for Alleged Victims of Topamax


(Vocus/PRWEB) April 12, 2011

On March 29, 2011 the Wall Street Journal covered the growing concern surrounding birth defects related to prescription medications taken by women during pregnancy. The article, entitiled “Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt The Baby?” examines the history of drug approval in the United States, as well as the lack of appropriate measures to determine dangers to pregnant women and unborn children (Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt the Baby, March 29, 2011, Wall Street Journal).

The article was spurred by the fact that in March of 2011, the FDA released a new MedAlert Safety Update regarding the pregnancy category classification of the popular migraine drug Topamax (also known as Topiragen or topiramate). (Topamax (topiramate): Label Change – Risk For Development of Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate in Newborns, March 4, 2011, fda.gov). This alert followed a troubling February 2011 annoucement that certain antipsychotic drugs including Haldol, Zyprexa, Seroquel and Abilify, could cause significant withdrawal symptoms after birth if a child is exposed en uteri. (Antipsychotic Drugs Used During Pregnancy Could Harm Newborn, February 2011, fda.gov).

A drug classification change for Topamax means that the drug is now placed in a drug category that indicates “there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans”. (Chart of FDA Pregnancy Categories, fda.gov) The FDA strongly advises that all other options be explored before a woman uses a category D drug during pregnancy and that the drug only be used if the risk to the mother outweighs the potential risk to the fetus.

The specific Topamax re-classification was encouraged by evidence presented by the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry suggesting that oral-facial deformities such as cleft lip and cleft palate may be linked to the use of Topamax during pregnancy. Specifically, the NAAED cites that the existence of major malformations was 3.8% in the topiramate-exposed group of infants versus 1.3% in the unexposed reference group. The prevalence of cleft lip was 0.69% versus the expected rate of .07% in the normal population. (Source: Herndandez-Diaz, S., Mittendorf, R., Holmes L.B. Comparative Safety of Topiramate During Pregnancy. Birth Defects Research (Part A); 88:408 (2010).)

Topamax is part of a class of drugs known as “anticonvulsants” or “anti-epileptics”, a class of drugs at the center of the birth defect debate. Numerous other anticonvulsant drugs, including the epileptic and seizure medication Depakote, have been linked to potential birth defects. Depakote, specifically, has been linked to serious neural tube malformations that cause the debilitating condition of spina bifida (Source: The Teratogenicity of Anticonvulsant Drugs, Lewis B. Holmes, M.D., N Engl J Med 2001; 344:1132-1138, April 12, 2001).

Currently, no comprehensive testing of potential drug risks for pregnant or breastfeeding women or unborn children exists. The ethical issues surrounding testing on these demographic groups prevents organized studies for this population. As a result, many of the birth defects that may be related to prescription drugs are not discovered until after the drug is released to the public and physicians or drug registry programs begin reporting a pattern of birth injuries.

RXBirthDefects.com is part of the family of resource websites created by the Consumer Justice Foundation, an online consumer watchdog agency. Following the Wall Street Journal article and the FDA classification change for Topamax, RXBirthDefects.com added a resource section dedicated to providing information about potential birth defects related to Topamax use during pregnancy.

The Topamax birth defect information covered on RXBirthDefects.com includes detailed information about the oral-facial malformations and genital malformations that may be related to the drug use. This includes facial clefts such as cleft lip, cleft palate and the male genital deformation of hypospadias (Source: Herndandez-Diaz, S., Mittendorf, R., Holmes L.B. Comparative Safety of Topiramate During Pregnancy. Birth Defects Research (Part A); 88:408 (2010)).

Families seeking legal recourse for birth injuries related to Topamax taken during pregnancy can find more information about how to file a Topamax lawsuit and updated news on the status of ongoing Topamax litigation in the United States. Families can connect immediately with reputable Topamax attorneys and legal representation via the free case evaluation form available online at RXBirthDefects.com.

About RXBirthDefects.com:

RXBirthDefects.com provides comprehensive information and resources regarding the use of prescription medication during pregnancy. The information on RXBirthDefects.com currently covers the prescription anticonvulsants Topamax, Dilantin, Depakote and Tegretol as well as the common antidepressants Celexa, Lexapro, Paxil, Pristiq, Prozac and Zoloft. The website provides an online resource center and free claim review form for women and families seeking more information about the specific birth defects that may be related to these drugs when used during pregnancy.

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Vkool.com Releases Their Tips On How To Prevent High Blood Pressure Naturally Without Medication


Seattle, WA (PRWEB) June 28, 2014

How To Prevent High Blood Pressure Naturally Without Medication, a new report on the site Vkool.com shows natural and safe tips to prevent hypertension without medication including:


    Maintain a healthy weight: if people lose pounds of weight, they can control their blood pressure level easily.
    Drink alcohol in moderation: if people drink alcohol too much, their blood pressure will be increased. To control the blood pressure level, people can create a diary of alcohol drinking and keep track of their drinking.
    Eat less salt and sodium: sodium and salt can increase blood pressure level; therefore, people should avoid eating processed foods and high-sodium packaged foods. Some foods that are high in sodium are processed meat, bacon, and potato chips.
    Change people’s eating habits and eat foods that help prevent hypertension effectively. To control blood pressure, people can eat healthy foods including vegetables, fruits, low-fat dairy products, and whole grains.
    Eat foods that are rich in potassium such as dairy foods, fish, fruits, and vegetables. Potassium can help decrease sodium effects on blood pressure
    Create a food diary to take note what people eat every day
    Eat foods that are high in calcium including low fat milk and yogurt, low fat cheese, dark leafy greens, Chinese cabbage, fortified soy products, green snap beans, broccoli, okra, almonds and fish canned.
    Eat garlic: garlic can help lower the risk of cancer diseases, improve good cholesterol, and reduce the risk of hypertension.
    Use fish oils: eating fishes (such as salmon and mackerel) that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids will help decrease high blood pressure quickly.
    Eat foods containing magnesium such as whole grains, beans, dry peas, seeds, nuts, and green leafy vegetables.
    Get regular exercise
    Keep an eye on people’s blood pressure level and get advice from doctors
    Reduce stress: stress is one of factors that can cause high blood pressure.
    Reduce caffeine intake: drinking caffeine is one of factors that may make blood pressure level increased
    Avoid tobacco products and secondhand smoke: smoking is one of the most factors that cause hypertension.

Hang Pham from the site Vkool.com says, “How To Prevent High Blood Pressure Naturally Without Medication is a good report that consists of a wide range of healthy diet tips and exercises for preventing high blood pressure naturally without drugs.”

If people want to get more detailed information from the “How To Prevent High Blood Pressure Naturally Without Medication” article, they should visit the website: http://vkool.com/how-to-prevent-high-blood-pressure/.

_____________

About Vkool.com: Vkool.com is the site built by Tony Nguyen. Vkool.com provides people with a wide range of useful articles on health, entertainment, and lifestyle. To see other articles, people can visit the homepage: Vkool – Better information, Better Lives.







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AristaTek, Inc. Releases Written Brief on the Dangerous Drug Acetyl Fenatyl


Laramie, Wyoming (PRWEB) March 25, 2014

The company will make this brief available at no cost to Hazmat teams, fire departments/fire marshals, law enforcement officials or any other public safety/health professionals to assist in their preparation and response to this onslaught of overdoses. The document is available to those that request it at the Company’s web site (http://www.aristatek.com).

Acetyl Fentanyl or Acetyl Fentanyl Hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate that has been found in street drugs and is sometimes mixed with or sold as heroin. This drug is not used in any prescription medicine nor is it commercially produced. Due to this lack of commercial production, very little information is available on the substance. The brief entitled ‘Acetyl Fentanyl – A Dangerous Street Drug’ consolidates information from many public sources in an effort to inform and educate first responders and public safety/health officials that may have this drug in their communities.

The use of acetyl fentanyl hydrochloride in street drugs was first noticed by Rhode Island State Health Laboratories testing blood samples from 10 deaths by drug users that occurred between March 7, 2013 and April 11, 2013 in a small city in northern Rhode Island. By May 2013, the number of Rhode Island acetyl fentanyl deaths had increased to 14. Since that time, clusters of acetyl fentanyl deaths have been reported in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Louisiana and elsewhere.

“One of our hazmat team customers in North Carolina recently approached us asking if we knew anything about this substance,” stated Bruce King, CEO of Aristatek. “After searching and finding little reputable data on acetyl fentanyl, we dug deeper and compiled some useful information that should help these folks with planning and responding to these incidents.”

One of the revelations in the brief is that acetyl fentanyl users have posted warnings saying acetyl fentanyl does not give enough of the “euphoric high” compared with heroin and this can lead to overdoses by improperly increasing dosage. The brief also touches on the conflicting reports on the drugs potency from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and other published studies, as well as confirming that naloxone, commercially known as Narcan, is the proper antidote for an overdose, albeit sometimes in higher doses.

“We modeled this brief after the technical reference resources found in our PEAC-WMD software product by consolidating many resources into easy-to-digest topics along with public resources,” continues King. “The brief covers potency, forms and uses, symptoms of exposure, routes of exposure, lethal doses, treatment, chemistry and we even attach a full CDC brief title ‘Recommendations for Laboratory Testing for Acetyl Fentanyl and Patient Evaluation and Treatment for Overdose with Synthetic Opioid’ so the reader doesn’t have to search further for this document for reference.”

This latest technical brief from AristaTek is a follow-up to their other popular briefs titled ‘Ammonium Nitrate Estimated Blast Effects’ released in September 2013 and ‘Toxic Consequences of Smoke Plumes from Crude Oil Fires’ released in September 2014. These briefs can also be requested by visiting the company’s web site.

About AristaTek

Formed in 1999 by four chemists and engineers who conducted field scale research studies at the Nevada Test Site’s Hazmat Spill Center (HSC) mandated by the 1986 Superfund and Reauthorization Act (SARA) and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) during the 1990’s, AristaTek has become a leading provider of CBRNE and HAZMAT response and planning solutions to the civilian and military market.

PEAC-WMD™, AristaTek’s leading software product, assists in response efforts by consolidating CBRNE & HAZMAT technical reference sources and automating stand-off distance modeling and communication of incident data. The PEAC® software is the industry-standard in the CBRNE & HAZMAT response community, supporting critical CBRNE units such as the National Guard Civil Support Teams (CST), the United States Air Force (USAF) and countless civilian responders worldwide. AristaTek is a certified HUBZone business. For additional information, visit http://www.aristatek.com.

Contact

AristaTek, Inc.

C. Scott Bunning – 310-721-2108







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ShopRTO.com Releases Its July 4th Home Celebration Tips


Austin, TX (PRWEB) June 28, 2014

Shop RTO website offers the following tips to make the July 4th celebration at home the best. The following tips are meant for those planning to host a gathering of 8 or more people at their home.

Shop RTO’s audience is the hard working American so it offers tips to make the event as cheap and easy as possible.

Begin with the party motif. Since it is July 4th, the theme is obvious with red, white and blue. Purchasing streamers, flags, plates and napkins are the easiest way to push the motif and are the most popular.

All sorts of stores are competing for business so there will be sales everywhere. Scan the internet or paper for the best deals. Encourage guests to dress up in festive wear or to bring their own elements showing the American spirit.

The site states that food and music are the basis for a great party. Regarding food, make it a potluck celebration. Guests are more than happy to share their recipes and help out with the party. It also offers variety to the menu and to spread the cost and time throughout the group.

Make sure to be healthy, offering fruits and vegetables. Watermelon is the most symbolic for July 4th. If there are alcoholic beverages, strongly encourage guests to have a designated driver and do not let guests drive home drunk.

Set up the stereo system or one or more speakers outside so music can be heard both inside and outside. If a TV is on, make sure it’s showing thematic programming such as a baseball game. They also recommend themed movies such as Independence Day and Field of Dreams as examples.

Have a set of games available. Ask guests to bring their fun games as well. Playing cards, dominoes and board games are the most popular. Set up tournaments to keep it fun and interesting.

Active games such as basketball, badminton, volley ball are great for the kids and adults. They also help an active lifestyle and wear guests out. If the kids have to play video games, make sure they’re motion games to keep them active.

Other tips listed is to provide sunblock and lots of water. Make sure enough ice chests are available and clean out the refrigerator prior to maximize space. And to make sure. Cover food away from flies and monitor foods that could spoil.

Shop RTO promotes rent to own home furnishings as a path to a comfortable home within a constrained weekly or monthly budget. Citing everything a home needs to accommodate family and guests, rent to own stores may be an option to consider when furnishing a home or renting items for the party.

About ShopRTO:

ShopRTO.com provides consumers home living and decorating tips and rent to own as a shopping option for affordable home furniture and more.







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Narconon Arrowhead Releases New Information on Two-Step Drug-free Detoxification Process


Canadian, Oklahoma (PRWEB) March 17, 2014

Narconon Arrowhead utilizes an innovative two-phase, holistic, drug-free method of detoxification to cleanse the body of drug residuals and reduce withdrawal symptoms. They have been using their drug-free method for almost five decades and it has helped them avoid the side effects, withdrawal symptoms and the potential for abuse of the many substitute drugs that can be utilized for drug detoxification purposes. The facility is now releasing new and additional information on the process and why it is successful.

Heroin is referred to as an opiate meaning it is derived from the opium poppy and it is also an opioid which includes opiates and semi-synthetic opioids such as Vicodin (hydrocodone) or OxyContin (oxycodone). Although these semi-synthetic drugs are legal prescription painkillers, they very similar to heroin and have similar effects such as a decreased perception of pain, feelings of euphoria, potential for addiction and cause severe drug withdrawal symptoms.(1) According to the latest data by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), nearly four out of five people who recently started using heroin used prescription painkillers first. (2)

Drug withdrawal refers to the symptoms that one can experience after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease in the intake of medications or recreational drugs to which one has formed a dependence.(3) Opioid withdrawal has often been compared to having very severe flu symptoms. Opioid withdrawal symptoms include restlessness, muscle and joint aches, nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea, anxiety, sweating and chills. These symptoms are so excruciating that it makes quitting the drugs very difficult to confront.

Also, after the acute symptoms have subsided, remaining symptoms such as anxiety, depression, insomnia, cravings, low self-esteem and others can persist.(4)

Part of the trap of opioid addiction is that, although these drugs cause these severe drug withdrawal symptoms, taking more of them also alleviates those withdrawal symptoms. The addiction persists as the addict continues to use the drugs, even though their drug use may be causing detrimental consequences, to avoid the pain and suffering caused by the drug withdrawal symptoms.

Why Drug Detox is Used

Drug detoxification is used to reduce or relieve drug withdrawal symptoms while helping the addicted individual adjust to living without drug use. Detoxification may be achieved in a drug-free manner or medications can be used as a form of treatment. The biochemistry definition of detoxification is the metabolic process by which toxins are changed into less toxic or more readily excretable substances.

The latter definition is the approach taken by Narconon Arrowhead and is further explained in their book, The Truth About Becoming Addicted: The theory is that drug residuals or toxins remain in the body and sustain the addiction until they can be changed through a specialized detoxification method into less toxic substances and excreted from the body. When drugs first enter the body of a drug user, they are recognized by the body as poisons and metabolized by the organs to be eliminated. Yet, residual amounts can remain behind in fat cells and other body organs and store in the body for some time after use. These drug residuals have the potential to act as a physical level reminder that can trigger strong thoughts to use drugs in a substance abuser long after they have stopped using drugs. This is commonly referred to as a craving. These cravings can be triggered at times when a person undergoes periods of physical or emotional stress.

Narconon Arrowhead’s Approach to Physical Detox

Narconon Arrowhead approaches full physical detoxification from drugs and alcohol in a very specific two phase approach. The first phase is to get the person to stop using and dry them out so there are no physical and/or mental side effects present from coming off drugs or alcohol. Once this dry out process is completed and the individual has been seen by a medical professional and deemed physically able to proceed, they move into the next phase of Narconon Arrowhead’s detoxification process, known as the New Life Detoxification program. In this phase of detoxification, a combination of light aerobic exercise, a low heat dry sauna, and a specific nutritional regime that is designed to decrease physical and mental cravings from drugs or alcohol is used.

One addict we will call Joe for anonymity said, “After I dried out and started the sauna detoxification program, I really noticed a big difference. I finally could sleep again, my body aches went away, I wasn’t so anxious, I started eating better and pretty soon I was feeling more and more normal. My energy also started to come back and my body and skin looked and felt like it used to when I was younger. And, this was all done by getting all the toxins and drugs out of my body rather than by putting more in. It was truly amazing!”

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends better access to substance abuse treatment, stating that effective, accessible substance abuse treatment programs could reduce overdose among people struggling with dependence and addiction and they encourage states to increase access to these important programs.

For more information on Narconon Arrowhead’s effective detoxification method for opiate addiction, please visit their site at http://www.narcononarrowhead.org or call 800-468-6933.

1.    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opiate

2.    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/2k13/DataReview/DR006/nonmedical-pain-reliever-use-2013.htm

3.    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_withdrawal

4.    http://www.opiateaddictionresource.com/addiction/opioid_withdrawal







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AristaTek, Inc. Releases Written Brief on the Dangerous Drug Acetyl Fenatyl


Laramie, Wyoming (PRWEB) March 25, 2014

The company will make this brief available at no cost to Hazmat teams, fire departments/fire marshals, law enforcement officials or any other public safety/health professionals to assist in their preparation and response to this onslaught of overdoses. The document is available to those that request it at the Company’s web site (http://www.aristatek.com).

Acetyl Fentanyl or Acetyl Fentanyl Hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate that has been found in street drugs and is sometimes mixed with or sold as heroin. This drug is not used in any prescription medicine nor is it commercially produced. Due to this lack of commercial production, very little information is available on the substance. The brief entitled ‘Acetyl Fentanyl – A Dangerous Street Drug’ consolidates information from many public sources in an effort to inform and educate first responders and public safety/health officials that may have this drug in their communities.

The use of acetyl fentanyl hydrochloride in street drugs was first noticed by Rhode Island State Health Laboratories testing blood samples from 10 deaths by drug users that occurred between March 7, 2013 and April 11, 2013 in a small city in northern Rhode Island. By May 2013, the number of Rhode Island acetyl fentanyl deaths had increased to 14. Since that time, clusters of acetyl fentanyl deaths have been reported in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Louisiana and elsewhere.

“One of our hazmat team customers in North Carolina recently approached us asking if we knew anything about this substance,” stated Bruce King, CEO of Aristatek. “After searching and finding little reputable data on acetyl fentanyl, we dug deeper and compiled some useful information that should help these folks with planning and responding to these incidents.”

One of the revelations in the brief is that acetyl fentanyl users have posted warnings saying acetyl fentanyl does not give enough of the “euphoric high” compared with heroin and this can lead to overdoses by improperly increasing dosage. The brief also touches on the conflicting reports on the drugs potency from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and other published studies, as well as confirming that naloxone, commercially known as Narcan, is the proper antidote for an overdose, albeit sometimes in higher doses.

“We modeled this brief after the technical reference resources found in our PEAC-WMD software product by consolidating many resources into easy-to-digest topics along with public resources,” continues King. “The brief covers potency, forms and uses, symptoms of exposure, routes of exposure, lethal doses, treatment, chemistry and we even attach a full CDC brief title ‘Recommendations for Laboratory Testing for Acetyl Fentanyl and Patient Evaluation and Treatment for Overdose with Synthetic Opioid’ so the reader doesn’t have to search further for this document for reference.”

This latest technical brief from AristaTek is a follow-up to their other popular briefs titled ‘Ammonium Nitrate Estimated Blast Effects’ released in September 2013 and ‘Toxic Consequences of Smoke Plumes from Crude Oil Fires’ released in September 2014. These briefs can also be requested by visiting the company’s web site.

About AristaTek

Formed in 1999 by four chemists and engineers who conducted field scale research studies at the Nevada Test Site’s Hazmat Spill Center (HSC) mandated by the 1986 Superfund and Reauthorization Act (SARA) and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) during the 1990’s, AristaTek has become a leading provider of CBRNE and HAZMAT response and planning solutions to the civilian and military market.

PEAC-WMD™, AristaTek’s leading software product, assists in response efforts by consolidating CBRNE & HAZMAT technical reference sources and automating stand-off distance modeling and communication of incident data. The PEAC® software is the industry-standard in the CBRNE & HAZMAT response community, supporting critical CBRNE units such as the National Guard Civil Support Teams (CST), the United States Air Force (USAF) and countless civilian responders worldwide. AristaTek is a certified HUBZone business. For additional information, visit http://www.aristatek.com.

Contact

AristaTek, Inc.

C. Scott Bunning – 310-721-2108







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New Beginnings Adolescent Recovery Center CEO Releases Guidelines: How to Effectively Treat Co-Occurring Disorders


Dallas, TX (PRWEB) May 21, 2014

Approximately 8.9 million adults who abuse drugs also have a mental health disorder, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. However, only 7.4 percent of those individuals receive effective treatment for both issues, which leaves many addicts struggling to recover.

Johnny Patout, CEO of New Beginnings Adolescent Recovery Center, the leading teen residential treatment program in the Southwest and one recognized nationwide for teen rehabilitation, has identified four key factors in effectively treating a patient suffering from both a mental health disorder in addition to a substance abuse disorder.

1. Integrate treatment. “Failing to see the addict as anything more than his or her addiction is a huge issue that causes many treatment centers to omit providing treatment to the person as a whole,” said Patout. “For patients with co-existing mental health disorders such as depression, ADHD or bipolar disorder, this kind of treatment philosophy simply will not work. Recovering addicts still affected by their mental health disorder will often return to their addiction at some point. It is crucial that the treatment center provide aid for all co-occurring disorders at the same time. This is the only way to ensure an addict reaches and maintains recovery.”

2. Treat trauma. “Mental health disorders and traumatic experiences often walk hand in hand,” said Patout. “However, many addiction professionals continue to believe that addicts need to go through a period of abstinence from any substances before they are ready to address their traumatic past experiences. In reality, this is counterproductive. Without first addressing their mental health issues and past experiences, most addicts will not be able to achieve recovery, much less effectively maintain it. Addressing such issues early in treatment will help set the stage for a smoother recovery process down the road.”

3. Focus on the group. “Group therapy has proven to be one of the most important factors in treating patients with co-occurring disorders,” said Patout. “Those who suffer from mental health disorders can often lend themselves to isolation or fear. Providing a safe, comfortable environment in which they can explore their issues with peers can help them build trust and self-confidence. Additionally, instilling the importance of group therapy while in rehab will increase patients’ chances of maintaining their aftercare group therapy when they leave the center.”

4. Monitor medications. “Taking the proper medication can be a struggle for any individual suffering from a mental health disorder,” said Patout. “Add a substance abuse disorder to the mix and it can be a recipe for disaster. Treatment centers have the unique ability to help these individuals by integrating their medication therapy plans and ensuring the patients adhere to the recommended dosages. Doctors and counselors can work together to ensure the patient is getting the correct medication and experiencing the intended response. Closely monitoring their medications in conjunction with non-pharmacological therapy can help make the process more comfortable for the recovering addict.”

For more information on teen drug addiction and recovery, please contact a New Beginnings representative at 1-888-706-1870.

About New Beginnings Adolescent Recovery Center

New Beginnings Adolescent Recovery Center, the leading teen drug rehabilitation program in the Southwest and one recognized nationwide, has been helping teens overcome addiction for more than 30 years. New Beginnings offers a continuum of care for inpatient treatment, residential treatment, partial hospitalization and outpatient programs, and works with private insurance providers to find the lowest costs for their patients. For more information, visit http://www.newbeginningsteenhelp.com/.







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AristaTek, Inc. Releases Written Brief on the Dangerous Drug Acetyl Fenatyl


Laramie, Wyoming (PRWEB) March 25, 2014

The company will make this brief available at no cost to Hazmat teams, fire departments/fire marshals, law enforcement officials or any other public safety/health professionals to assist in their preparation and response to this onslaught of overdoses. The document is available to those that request it at the Company’s web site (http://www.aristatek.com).

Acetyl Fentanyl or Acetyl Fentanyl Hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate that has been found in street drugs and is sometimes mixed with or sold as heroin. This drug is not used in any prescription medicine nor is it commercially produced. Due to this lack of commercial production, very little information is available on the substance. The brief entitled ‘Acetyl Fentanyl – A Dangerous Street Drug’ consolidates information from many public sources in an effort to inform and educate first responders and public safety/health officials that may have this drug in their communities.

The use of acetyl fentanyl hydrochloride in street drugs was first noticed by Rhode Island State Health Laboratories testing blood samples from 10 deaths by drug users that occurred between March 7, 2013 and April 11, 2013 in a small city in northern Rhode Island. By May 2013, the number of Rhode Island acetyl fentanyl deaths had increased to 14. Since that time, clusters of acetyl fentanyl deaths have been reported in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Louisiana and elsewhere.

“One of our hazmat team customers in North Carolina recently approached us asking if we knew anything about this substance,” stated Bruce King, CEO of Aristatek. “After searching and finding little reputable data on acetyl fentanyl, we dug deeper and compiled some useful information that should help these folks with planning and responding to these incidents.”

One of the revelations in the brief is that acetyl fentanyl users have posted warnings saying acetyl fentanyl does not give enough of the “euphoric high” compared with heroin and this can lead to overdoses by improperly increasing dosage. The brief also touches on the conflicting reports on the drugs potency from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and other published studies, as well as confirming that naloxone, commercially known as Narcan, is the proper antidote for an overdose, albeit sometimes in higher doses.

“We modeled this brief after the technical reference resources found in our PEAC-WMD software product by consolidating many resources into easy-to-digest topics along with public resources,” continues King. “The brief covers potency, forms and uses, symptoms of exposure, routes of exposure, lethal doses, treatment, chemistry and we even attach a full CDC brief title ‘Recommendations for Laboratory Testing for Acetyl Fentanyl and Patient Evaluation and Treatment for Overdose with Synthetic Opioid’ so the reader doesn’t have to search further for this document for reference.”

This latest technical brief from AristaTek is a follow-up to their other popular briefs titled ‘Ammonium Nitrate Estimated Blast Effects’ released in September 2013 and ‘Toxic Consequences of Smoke Plumes from Crude Oil Fires’ released in September 2014. These briefs can also be requested by visiting the company’s web site.

About AristaTek

Formed in 1999 by four chemists and engineers who conducted field scale research studies at the Nevada Test Site’s Hazmat Spill Center (HSC) mandated by the 1986 Superfund and Reauthorization Act (SARA) and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) during the 1990’s, AristaTek has become a leading provider of CBRNE and HAZMAT response and planning solutions to the civilian and military market.

PEAC-WMD™, AristaTek’s leading software product, assists in response efforts by consolidating CBRNE & HAZMAT technical reference sources and automating stand-off distance modeling and communication of incident data. The PEAC® software is the industry-standard in the CBRNE & HAZMAT response community, supporting critical CBRNE units such as the National Guard Civil Support Teams (CST), the United States Air Force (USAF) and countless civilian responders worldwide. AristaTek is a certified HUBZone business. For additional information, visit http://www.aristatek.com.

Contact

AristaTek, Inc.

C. Scott Bunning – 310-721-2108