Tag Archives: psychologist

Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk







Time to think about providing eldercare support for employees says top psychologist


Basingstoke, Hampshire (PRWEB UK) 17 October 2014

With people living longer than ever before, many employees are juggling full-time work with caring for loved ones. Until now, companies have been quick to focus on support for those with young children – offering childcare as a business benefit.

Now, the concept of ‘eldercare’ is seen as key to increasing loyalty among many UK workers.

“An increasing number of people are torn between having to turn up for work everyday and needing to make sure their parents are OK,” said Professor Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organised psychology and organisational psychology.

“And, in many cases, they don’t even live close by. This can bring on a high degree of anxiety – particularly among those whose loved ones have suddenly become ill or unable to cope on their own”.

“Often this means helping parents to leave the home they may have lived in for many years and managing their move into residential care. This throws up all kinds of emotional and logistical challenges”.

“I see a need – and some definite advantages – for businesses to support employees who find themselves in this kind of situation”.

“Knowing your employer cares for your wellbeing and understands the difficulties you face is likely to make you more loyal – and it should actually increase morale among your colleagues too.”

With few alternative options, many employees take leave – or even resign – so they can support elderly relatives – including helping them through the process of finding the right care solution and moving home.

“This isn’t ideal for anyone because, with many carers in the 45-64 age range, it means businesses are increasingly at risk of losing talented workers who may well have occupied senior positions,” added Professor Cooper.

A business benefit service, time4care provides expert advice and support – including care, financial and legal – to anyone faced with the challenges of moving their parents into residential care.

A dedicated liaison officer is on hand to oversee the entire process. From providing expert guidance on care options to dealing with estate agents, solicitors, house clearance or vacant property management, nothing is left to chance.

The service also gives employees access to qualified financial advisors, specialising in care fees planning and the financial affairs of older people. And solicitors for the elderly are also part of the time4care offering – standing by to ensure all legal safeguards are met.

More information about the extensive support available through time4care is available at http://www.time4care.co.uk, through the dedicated helpline on 01256 313888 or contact(at)time4care.co(dot)uk