Tag Archives: Prescription

Purchase Xanax Without a Prescription

T’was the night before the big exam and you are feeling anxious and panicky. You cannot sleep and you are wet with perspiration. What you are experiencing is a temporary anxiety and panic attack that will be gone when you take the exam and get your grades. If you have these feelings when you are not facing something big in your life, then you may have an anxiety disorder with panic attacks. There are many people that have anxiety disorders and panic attacks try to hide them and this is not a good idea. Unlike the minor anxiety and panic attacks we mentioned, the lasting attacks to not go away by themselves.  If you suffer from anxiety and panic attacks see your doctor regarding treatment. Treatment recommended may be medication. Therapy and/or lifestyle change.

There are symptoms associated with anxiety disorders and panic attacks such as: shortness of breath, excessive perspiration, dizziness, muscle tension, and trouble sleeping to mention just a few. See your healthcare professional as soon as possible if you have any of the mentioned symptoms. Unlike the minor condition we mentioned these symptoms will not get better and the condition will only worsen with time. Anxiety disorders and panic attacks can be treated successfully if you consult your healthcare professional as soon as you feel the symptoms.

When you are examined by your doctor he/she will recommend one of three, or all three treatments: medication, therapy and lifestyle change. It is difficult to change something you have been doing the better part of your life but in this case a lifestyle change may be necessary. The lifestyle change may just be one that is healthier and would include a proper diet and exercise and a change in social and personal activities. If you have a social anxiety, the therapist will work to help you overcome your fears. When medication is recommended, the medication should be Xanax.

For anxiety disorders, panic attacks and moderate depression, Xanax is the medication generally recommended. Sometimes referred to Zanex, Zanax or Xanex can be bought without a prescription online from RXworth pharmacy. You can buy cheap Xanax from RXworth pharmacy online with no prescription and you can be sure that the medication is FDA approved. RXworth pharmacy sells only medications that are FDA approved.

There is a decided difference between minor anxiety and panic attacks, and the real thing. buying xanax online at best xanax online.

Richard is a full time internet marketer, with more than 6 years of experience in giving advice to thousands of customers on choosing the best products online

What Are Some Prescription Drug Abuse Effects?

Prescription Drug Abuse Effects can be just as damaging as Illicit Street Drugs like Marijuana, Opiates and Methamphetamines. Just because people can purchase these over the counter doesn’t mean they are safe for everyone. What could help one person can destroy another. If you are addicted to Pain Killers for example, it could cause Liver Problems.

What’s worse is if you use Pain Killers with sedatives, you can weaken your central nervous system and get a heart attack or stroke. This happens more often that we like to admit. Don’t believe me? Look at Michael Jackson and Anna Nicole Smith. These were two people with everything in the world to live for. But they thought Prescription Drugs was a great, legal escape and they paid with their lives. Both were in the prime of their careers with money, influence and connections most of us only go to sleep at night and dream about.

Esophageal spasms are common that make it hard to digest your food. Not to mention that it could take years to recover from Prescription Pill Addictions. Withdrawals can be terrible, and some people will never stop until they are dead or through a Forced Intervention.

What makes this worse is that many people start Prescription Drug Abuse to escape depression. But not only do the problems they were originally trying to avoid not go away, their health gets worse so later down the road they have to face these issues and health challenges at the same time. Not to mention these problems more than likely exacerbated over the period of time they were addicted to narcotics.

Right now I don’t believe the government does much to monitor the control of Prescription Drugs. And not too mention the price of Prescription Drugs keeps rising which hurts the average working stiff. These are just a couple things you might wanna think about before dropping some more Pain Killers.

Let Brian Garvin and Jeff West teach you about Drugs Intervention and Substance Abuse Intervention at our Substance Abuse Prevention Website.

How to Treat ADHD Without Prescription Drugs

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral and developmental disorder characterized by impulsivity, inattentiveness, and hyperactivity. Since it was first described in the 1970s, this disorder has been steeped in controversy.

There has been a lot of disagreement among clinicians, teachers and educators, parents, counselors and child experts on whether this disease actually exists. Some of these kids are labeled as “problem students” when they enter school. This labeling is harmful to a child’s self-esteem and is very hurtful to his family.

The most raging controversy so far is the use of stimulant medications in treatment. Many disapprove of the use of these medications because of limited studies on their long-term use and on their effect on very young children.  Because of these safety and efficacy concerns, who can blame us if we search for an alternative medicine for ADHD.

Behavior modifications, lifestyle and diet changes, homeopathy, EEG neurofeedback, use of visual and auditory calming techniques are just some of the novel treatment approaches I found on the Internet.

Behavioral interventions include psychoeducational input, behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, family therapy, school-based interventions, social skills training, and parent management training. I enrolled my child in behavior therapy. This is conducted on one-on-one sessions, dyads, and in groups.

During one-on-one sessions, the therapist targets several behavioral problems which she has identified in my child. She coaches my child on socially-accepted norms such as taking turns, waiting in line, and not interrupting conversations. My child is coached on social cues such as looking at a person when he is talking to them. He is also taught ways to monitor his behavior. One activity, which is called mirroring, teaches my child empathy.

There are also family therapies which help parents and other family members deal with ADHD. Data from the United States show that there are more divorces among parents of children with ADHD than in parents of children without. During family therapies, we are taught strategies to cope with our feelings of frustration, anger, guilt, and inadequacy. Tips on parenting and understanding our child with ADHD are also given.

Changing the diet is another form of alternative medicine for ADHD. The recommended ADHD diet should be comprised of natural ingredients, having a 50-50 balance of proteins and carbohydrates during lunch and dinner and a 60-40 ratio for breakfast, and lots of fruits and organic vegetables. Although no definitive link has been established between diet and ADHD, there is no question that food affects our health. This is reflected in the adage: you are what you eat. It is argued that mental health depends on the food we eat. A diet high in sugar can result in restlessness and hyperactivity. An improperly nourished child is lethargic, has trouble concentrating, and is forgetful. These lead to learning difficulties.

Another alternative is EEG Neurofeedback, or biofeedback. This intervention uses a machine called an electroencephalogram (EEG) to monitor brain wave patterns. This intervention makes use of the waves emitted by our brains: alpha (medium), beta (fast), theta (slow), and delta (deep sleep). A child is hooked to the machine and his brain wave pattern monitored. When he emits a beta wave, a signal is given. The child with ADHD is taught to increase beta wave activity which is responsible for arousal. In the same manner, he is taught to suppress theta wave activity.

Homeopathy is an alternative form of medicine which focuses on reversing the imbalance present in the body without resorting to drugs. Homeopathy takes detailed medical histories so they can address all the ailments affecting a person. The therapy focuses on issues and behaviors that are most prominent in a person with ADHD. Homeopathy uses very minute quantities of natural ingredients, thus increasing potency while decreasing the risks for side effects.

You may try any one of these ADHD alternative medicine. But bear in mind that some of these methods have not been shown to be effective. To make sure that you and your child are not harmed, seek the advice of your doctor.

Puneet writes a blog about ADHD and helps ADHD sufferers to find new treatments in naturopathy and alternative medicine. If you are looking for a well-researched alternative medicine for ADHD, you may read more

Purchase Xanax Without a Prescription

T’was the night before the big exam and you are feeling anxious and panicky. You cannot sleep and you are wet with perspiration. What you are experiencing is a temporary anxiety and panic attack that will be gone when you take the exam and get your grades. If you have these feelings when you are not facing something big in your life, then you may have an anxiety disorder with panic attacks. There are many people that have anxiety disorders and panic attacks try to hide them and this is not a good idea. Unlike the minor anxiety and panic attacks we mentioned, the lasting attacks to not go away by themselves.  If you suffer from anxiety and panic attacks see your doctor regarding treatment. Treatment recommended may be medication. Therapy and/or lifestyle change.

There are symptoms associated with anxiety disorders and panic attacks such as: shortness of breath, excessive perspiration, dizziness, muscle tension, and trouble sleeping to mention just a few. See your healthcare professional as soon as possible if you have any of the mentioned symptoms. Unlike the minor condition we mentioned these symptoms will not get better and the condition will only worsen with time. Anxiety disorders and panic attacks can be treated successfully if you consult your healthcare professional as soon as you feel the symptoms.

When you are examined by your doctor he/she will recommend one of three, or all three treatments: medication, therapy and lifestyle change. It is difficult to change something you have been doing the better part of your life but in this case a lifestyle change may be necessary. The lifestyle change may just be one that is healthier and would include a proper diet and exercise and a change in social and personal activities. If you have a social anxiety, the therapist will work to help you overcome your fears. When medication is recommended, the medication should be Xanax.

For anxiety disorders, panic attacks and moderate depression, Xanax is the medication generally recommended. Sometimes referred to Zanex, Zanax or Xanex can be bought without a prescription online from RXworth pharmacy. You can buy cheap Xanax from RXworth pharmacy online with no prescription and you can be sure that the medication is FDA approved. RXworth pharmacy sells only medications that are FDA approved.

There is a decided difference between minor anxiety and panic attacks, and the real thing. buying xanax online at best xanax online.

Richard is a full time internet marketer, with more than 6 years of experience in giving advice to thousands of customers on choosing the best products online

gI_126298_11_227796F_sokler_Data_Stats_VitalSigns_November_1702

Prescription Painkiller Overdoses at Epidemic Levels


Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) November 02, 2011

The death toll from overdoses of prescription painkillers has more than tripled in the past decade, according to an analysis in the CDC Vital Signs report released today from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This new finding shows that more than 40 people die every day from overdoses involving narcotic pain relievers like hydrocodone (Vicodin), methadone, oxycodone (OxyContin), and oxymorphone (Opana).

“Overdoses involving prescription painkillers are at epidemic levels and now kill more Americans than heroin and cocaine combined,” said CDC Director Thomas Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “States, health insurers, health care providers and individuals have critical roles to play in the national effort to stop this epidemic of overdoses while we protect patients who need prescriptions to control pain.”

The increased use of prescription painkillers for nonmedical reasons (without a prescription for the high they cause), along with growing sales, has contributed to the large number of overdoses and deaths. In 2010, 1 in every 20 people in the United States age 12 and older—a total of 12 million people—reported using prescription painkillers nonmedically according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Based on the data from the Drug Enforcement Administration, sales of these drugs to pharmacies and health care providers have increased by more than 300 percent since 1999.

In April, a national comprehensive action plan was released to address the national prescription drug abuse epidemic to reduce this public health burden. Titled “Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis,” the plan includes support for the expansion of state-based prescription drug monitoring programs, more convenient and environmentally responsible disposal methods to remove unused medications from the home, education for patients and healthcare providers, and support for law enforcement efforts that reduce the prevalence of “pill mills” and doctor shopping.

The prescription painkiller death rates among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians/Alaska Natives were three times those of blacks and Hispanic whites. In addition, the death rate was highest among persons aged 35–54 years. Overdose resulted in 830,652 years of potential life lost before age 65 years, a number comparable to the years of potential life lost from motor vehicle crashes and much higher than the years of potential life lost due to homicide.

For the analysis, CDC reviewed state data on fatal drug overdoses, nonmedical use of prescription painkillers, and sales of prescription painkillers to pharmacies and health care providers.

The study found:


State death rates from overdoses (from 2008 data) ranged from a high of 27.0 deaths per 100,000 people in New Mexico to a low of 5.5 deaths per 100,000 people in Nebraska.
Nonmedical use of prescription painkillers ranged from a high of 1 in 12 people aged 12 and older in Oklahoma to a low of 1 in 30 in Nebraska. States with more nonmedical use tend to have more deaths from drug overdoses.
Prescription painkiller sales per person were more than three times higher in the highest state, Florida, than in the lowest state, Illinois. States with higher sales per person tend to have higher death rates from drug overdose.

While national strategies are being strengthened, states, as regulators of health care practice and large public insurers, can take the following steps to help prevent overdoses from prescription painkillers and reduce this public health burden:

Start or improve prescription drug monitoring programs, which are electronic databases that track all prescriptions for painkillers in the state.
Use prescription drug monitoring programs, public insurance programs, and workers’ compensation data to identify improper prescribing of painkillers.
Set up programs for public insurance programs, workers’ compensation programs, and state-run health plans that identify and address improper patient use of painkillers.
Pass, enforce and evaluate pill mill, doctor shopping and other state laws to reduce prescription painkiller abuse.
Encourage professional state licensing boards to take action against inappropriate prescribing.
Increase access to substance abuse treatment.

CDC is also releasing “Policy Impact: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses,” one in a series of issue briefs highlighting key public health issues and important, science-based policy actions that can be taken to address them. Through this new publication, CDC supports state-based efforts to reduce prescription drug abuse while ensuring patients have access to safe, effective pain treatment.

For more information about prescription drug overdoses in the United States, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Poisoning.

CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money to have a more secure nation. Whether these threats are chronic or acute, manmade or natural, human error or deliberate attack, global or domestic, CDC is the U.S. health protection agency.

Vital Signs is a CDC report that appears on the first Tuesday of the month as part of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, or MMWR. The report provides the latest data and information on key health indicators, such as cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco use, motor vehicle passenger safety, prescription drug overdose, HIV/AIDS, alcohol use, health care-associated infections, cardiovascular health, teen pregnancy, asthma, and food safety.

###







How to Treat ADHD Without Prescription Drugs

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral and developmental disorder characterized by impulsivity, inattentiveness, and hyperactivity. Since it was first described in the 1970s, this disorder has been steeped in controversy.

There has been a lot of disagreement among clinicians, teachers and educators, parents, counselors and child experts on whether this disease actually exists. Some of these kids are labeled as “problem students” when they enter school. This labeling is harmful to a child’s self-esteem and is very hurtful to his family.

The most raging controversy so far is the use of stimulant medications in treatment. Many disapprove of the use of these medications because of limited studies on their long-term use and on their effect on very young children.  Because of these safety and efficacy concerns, who can blame us if we search for an alternative medicine for ADHD.

Behavior modifications, lifestyle and diet changes, homeopathy, EEG neurofeedback, use of visual and auditory calming techniques are just some of the novel treatment approaches I found on the Internet.

Behavioral interventions include psychoeducational input, behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, family therapy, school-based interventions, social skills training, and parent management training. I enrolled my child in behavior therapy. This is conducted on one-on-one sessions, dyads, and in groups.

During one-on-one sessions, the therapist targets several behavioral problems which she has identified in my child. She coaches my child on socially-accepted norms such as taking turns, waiting in line, and not interrupting conversations. My child is coached on social cues such as looking at a person when he is talking to them. He is also taught ways to monitor his behavior. One activity, which is called mirroring, teaches my child empathy.

There are also family therapies which help parents and other family members deal with ADHD. Data from the United States show that there are more divorces among parents of children with ADHD than in parents of children without. During family therapies, we are taught strategies to cope with our feelings of frustration, anger, guilt, and inadequacy. Tips on parenting and understanding our child with ADHD are also given.

Changing the diet is another form of alternative medicine for ADHD. The recommended ADHD diet should be comprised of natural ingredients, having a 50-50 balance of proteins and carbohydrates during lunch and dinner and a 60-40 ratio for breakfast, and lots of fruits and organic vegetables. Although no definitive link has been established between diet and ADHD, there is no question that food affects our health. This is reflected in the adage: you are what you eat. It is argued that mental health depends on the food we eat. A diet high in sugar can result in restlessness and hyperactivity. An improperly nourished child is lethargic, has trouble concentrating, and is forgetful. These lead to learning difficulties.

Another alternative is EEG Neurofeedback, or biofeedback. This intervention uses a machine called an electroencephalogram (EEG) to monitor brain wave patterns. This intervention makes use of the waves emitted by our brains: alpha (medium), beta (fast), theta (slow), and delta (deep sleep). A child is hooked to the machine and his brain wave pattern monitored. When he emits a beta wave, a signal is given. The child with ADHD is taught to increase beta wave activity which is responsible for arousal. In the same manner, he is taught to suppress theta wave activity.

Homeopathy is an alternative form of medicine which focuses on reversing the imbalance present in the body without resorting to drugs. Homeopathy takes detailed medical histories so they can address all the ailments affecting a person. The therapy focuses on issues and behaviors that are most prominent in a person with ADHD. Homeopathy uses very minute quantities of natural ingredients, thus increasing potency while decreasing the risks for side effects.

You may try any one of these ADHD alternative medicine. But bear in mind that some of these methods have not been shown to be effective. To make sure that you and your child are not harmed, seek the advice of your doctor.

Puneet writes a blog about ADHD and helps ADHD sufferers to find new treatments in naturopathy and alternative medicine. If you are looking for a well-researched alternative medicine for ADHD, you may read more

What Are Some Prescription Drug Abuse Effects?

Prescription Drug Abuse Effects can be just as damaging as Illicit Street Drugs like Marijuana, Opiates and Methamphetamines. Just because people can purchase these over the counter doesn’t mean they are safe for everyone. What could help one person can destroy another. If you are addicted to Pain Killers for example, it could cause Liver Problems.

What’s worse is if you use Pain Killers with sedatives, you can weaken your central nervous system and get a heart attack or stroke. This happens more often that we like to admit. Don’t believe me? Look at Michael Jackson and Anna Nicole Smith. These were two people with everything in the world to live for. But they thought Prescription Drugs was a great, legal escape and they paid with their lives. Both were in the prime of their careers with money, influence and connections most of us only go to sleep at night and dream about.

Esophageal spasms are common that make it hard to digest your food. Not to mention that it could take years to recover from Prescription Pill Addictions. Withdrawals can be terrible, and some people will never stop until they are dead or through a Forced Intervention.

What makes this worse is that many people start Prescription Drug Abuse to escape depression. But not only do the problems they were originally trying to avoid not go away, their health gets worse so later down the road they have to face these issues and health challenges at the same time. Not to mention these problems more than likely exacerbated over the period of time they were addicted to narcotics.

Right now I don’t believe the government does much to monitor the control of Prescription Drugs. And not too mention the price of Prescription Drugs keeps rising which hurts the average working stiff. These are just a couple things you might wanna think about before dropping some more Pain Killers.

Let Brian Garvin and Jeff West teach you about Drugs Intervention and Substance Abuse Intervention at our Substance Abuse Prevention Website.

Narconon Survey Confirms Pervasive Prescription Drug Abuse by Young Americans

(PRWEB) June 06, 2013

According to the Partnership at Drugfree.org, there are more teens misusing and abusing prescription drugs than ever before. In April 2013, this non-profit organization published their annual Partnership Attitude Tracking Survey (PATS) that showed that one in four American teens has misused or abused a prescription drug. This figure increased 33% over the prior five years. To verify this information, the records of rehab admissions at the Narconon Arrowhead rehabilitation facility were combed to determine how many young admissions fit this pattern. An overwhelming 89% of young adults who were admitted to this rehab reported prescription drug abuse and addiction – usually years of this addictive habit.

These admissions were part of a larger tabulation of the drug abuse history of treatment admissions. Those selected out were between the ages of 18 and 22 years of age when they arrived. The lists of prescription drugs that had been abused at this tender age were astonishing. Drug abuse histories like these were all-too typical:

C was a 21-year-old male whose major addiction was to opiates. He had abused them daily for three years before arriving at Narconon Arrowhead. He’d tried cocaine but it caused him to have seizures. The list of opiates he had abused included methadone, Lortab, OxyContin, Darvocet, fentanyl, tramadol, Norco, Percocet, codeine, Subutex and Suboxone. In previous attempts to get sober, he had been given Xanax, Seroquel, Klonopin and Ativan in detox facilities. C had received tickets for 15 major driving violations and had been charged with three DUIs.

K was a 22-year-old female who had been abusing opiates for ten years when she arrived at Narconon Arrowhead. Her list included heroin, morphine, Dilaudid, Percocet, Demerol, Darvon, Darvocet, codeine, OxyContin, Subutex, Suboxone, opium, hydrocodone, tramadol, Norco and Lortab. A few days a month, she added Xanax, Klonopin or Valium. She had also abused methamphetamine, Ritalin and Adderall. At one point, she had a $ 900/day drug habit. She made money taking people to unscrupulous doctors so she could acquire pills that could be sold to other addicts.

“Many of these prescription drugs are so addictive that it does not take much abuse before a young person totally loses the power of choice,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “Once this trap slams shut, these young people may quickly spiral down into horrifying levels of drug use or even death. But we have found that even these cases can recover, when given enough time and a thorough enough approach to recovery.”

The PATS survey also showed that only 16 percent of parents discuss the dangers of prescription painkillers and even fewer discuss other types of prescription drugs. To help parents know how to start talking to their children about these drugs, Narconon International has created a guide called Ten Things Parents May Not Know about Prescription Drug Abuse. This free downloadable guide can be obtained at http://www.narconon.org/drug-abuse/10-things-prescription-drugs.html.

“It’s not easy to protect your children from abuse of drugs and alcohol,” added Carr. “At Narconon International, we are doing everything we can to help, including publishing a variety of guides to help parents eliminate the possibility of drug abuse or addiction among their children.”

In addition to the guide on prescription drug abuse, there are others advising parents on what they need to know about marijuana, recommending ways to protect children from drug abuse over the summer and helping families who are dealing with addiction to know what to do. These new Narconon® materials are available on http://www.narconon.org/drug-abuse/parent-center.html.

For more information on Narconon, call 1-800-775-8750 or visit http://www.narconon.org.







gI_126298_11_227796F_sokler_Data_Stats_VitalSigns_November_1701

Prescription Painkiller Overdoses at Epidemic Levels


Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) November 02, 2011

The death toll from overdoses of prescription painkillers has more than tripled in the past decade, according to an analysis in the CDC Vital Signs report released today from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This new finding shows that more than 40 people die every day from overdoses involving narcotic pain relievers like hydrocodone (Vicodin), methadone, oxycodone (OxyContin), and oxymorphone (Opana).

“Overdoses involving prescription painkillers are at epidemic levels and now kill more Americans than heroin and cocaine combined,” said CDC Director Thomas Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “States, health insurers, health care providers and individuals have critical roles to play in the national effort to stop this epidemic of overdoses while we protect patients who need prescriptions to control pain.”

The increased use of prescription painkillers for nonmedical reasons (without a prescription for the high they cause), along with growing sales, has contributed to the large number of overdoses and deaths. In 2010, 1 in every 20 people in the United States age 12 and older—a total of 12 million people—reported using prescription painkillers nonmedically according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Based on the data from the Drug Enforcement Administration, sales of these drugs to pharmacies and health care providers have increased by more than 300 percent since 1999.

In April, a national comprehensive action plan was released to address the national prescription drug abuse epidemic to reduce this public health burden. Titled “Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis,” the plan includes support for the expansion of state-based prescription drug monitoring programs, more convenient and environmentally responsible disposal methods to remove unused medications from the home, education for patients and healthcare providers, and support for law enforcement efforts that reduce the prevalence of “pill mills” and doctor shopping.

The prescription painkiller death rates among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians/Alaska Natives were three times those of blacks and Hispanic whites. In addition, the death rate was highest among persons aged 35–54 years. Overdose resulted in 830,652 years of potential life lost before age 65 years, a number comparable to the years of potential life lost from motor vehicle crashes and much higher than the years of potential life lost due to homicide.

For the analysis, CDC reviewed state data on fatal drug overdoses, nonmedical use of prescription painkillers, and sales of prescription painkillers to pharmacies and health care providers.

The study found:


State death rates from overdoses (from 2008 data) ranged from a high of 27.0 deaths per 100,000 people in New Mexico to a low of 5.5 deaths per 100,000 people in Nebraska.
Nonmedical use of prescription painkillers ranged from a high of 1 in 12 people aged 12 and older in Oklahoma to a low of 1 in 30 in Nebraska. States with more nonmedical use tend to have more deaths from drug overdoses.
Prescription painkiller sales per person were more than three times higher in the highest state, Florida, than in the lowest state, Illinois. States with higher sales per person tend to have higher death rates from drug overdose.

While national strategies are being strengthened, states, as regulators of health care practice and large public insurers, can take the following steps to help prevent overdoses from prescription painkillers and reduce this public health burden:

Start or improve prescription drug monitoring programs, which are electronic databases that track all prescriptions for painkillers in the state.
Use prescription drug monitoring programs, public insurance programs, and workers’ compensation data to identify improper prescribing of painkillers.
Set up programs for public insurance programs, workers’ compensation programs, and state-run health plans that identify and address improper patient use of painkillers.
Pass, enforce and evaluate pill mill, doctor shopping and other state laws to reduce prescription painkiller abuse.
Encourage professional state licensing boards to take action against inappropriate prescribing.
Increase access to substance abuse treatment.

CDC is also releasing “Policy Impact: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses,” one in a series of issue briefs highlighting key public health issues and important, science-based policy actions that can be taken to address them. Through this new publication, CDC supports state-based efforts to reduce prescription drug abuse while ensuring patients have access to safe, effective pain treatment.

For more information about prescription drug overdoses in the United States, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Poisoning.

CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money to have a more secure nation. Whether these threats are chronic or acute, manmade or natural, human error or deliberate attack, global or domestic, CDC is the U.S. health protection agency.

Vital Signs is a CDC report that appears on the first Tuesday of the month as part of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, or MMWR. The report provides the latest data and information on key health indicators, such as cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco use, motor vehicle passenger safety, prescription drug overdose, HIV/AIDS, alcohol use, health care-associated infections, cardiovascular health, teen pregnancy, asthma, and food safety.

###







gI_105424_PASSAGES_02

Passages Malibu Comments on the Growing Threat to Womens Health From Prescription Medication


Malibu, CA (PRWEB) July 22, 2013

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) revealed in a recent public report that the number of deaths for painkiller overdoses among women is four times higher than those from heroin and cocaine combined. Between 1999 and 2010, 48,000 women died from prescription painkiller overdoses.

CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden revealed that painkiller overdoses have increased 400% in the last ten years, “rates that we have never seen before.”

Women are 50% more likely to be prescribed medication for treating pain than men. Statistics show that the highest rate of overdose appears to be among women in their 40s and 50s. The highest rate for opiate abuse comes from women in their 20s and 30s.

The CDC report revealed that because women statistically have a lower body mass than men, “the gap between a therapeutic dose and an overdose is narrower.”

Overdoses occur when an individual develops a tolerance for a particular drug and more & more of the substance is required to create the same feeling that the drug originally produced. Prescription painkillers like Vicodin, OxyContin, and Dilaudid are often so strong that in addition to decreasing the perception of pain, they often produce feelings of euphoria and can sedate users; sometimes slowing respiration until they simply stop breathing.

“This new report brings up serious concerns about the dependence that so many women have on opiate painkillers,” said Pax Prentiss, CEO of Passages Addiction Treatment Centers. “It’s a troubling trend. Fortunately, the advanced treatment options we offer have remained effective at helping both men and women treat and heal their addictions.”

At Passages Malibu – Addiction Ends Here™

About Passages Malibu & Passages Ventura:

Father and son team Chris and Pax Prentiss founded Passages Malibu in 2001. Its second location, Passages Ventura, first opened its doors in 2009. The two drug, alcohol, and prescription medication abuse treatment centers offer an alternative to the 12 step/AA model of addiction treatment by utilizing a holistic program that focuses on the underlying issues of substance dependency, rather than attributing addiction to an incurable disease.

Both Passages Malibu and Passages Ventura accept insurance and each have earned the coveted Joint Commission (JCAHO) accreditation, which has only been given to 6% of the nation’s behavioral health treatment programs.

Passages Malibu was named the #1 treatment center in the world by Healthcare Global, one of the “Most Luxurious Places to Dry Out” by Forbes magazine, and the Huffington Post recently acknowledged Passages as a center that “caters to a high-end crowd, with many CEOs, entrepreneurs and high-powered professionals among its clients.”

The co-founders are also authors of an acclaimed series of addiction treatment books, including their groundbreaking, flagship title, The Alcoholism & Addiction Cure.

For general inquiries about treatment, contact: 866-233-1753.

For media inquiries, contact:

press(at)passagesmalibu(dot)com