Tag Archives: Prescription

Florida Sees Drop in Prescription Drug Deaths

(PRWEB) July 02, 2014

As reported by Tech Times in the article, Deaths In Florida Due To Pain Killers, Other Drugs Drop Thanks To Tougher Measures, (7/2), recent statistics have found that prescription pain killer-related deaths in the state of Florida have dropped off after a dramatic increase, mostly due to the fact that state legislators have cracked down on illegal pill mills and clinics. Ever since the state put strict laws into place for requiring pain clinics to register with the state, the ability to obtain prescription pills for abuse has gotten harder. These statistics are also in part from police raids on clinics, clinic closures, and arrests of those who were pushing the pills. Law enforcement officials especially focused on doctors who were prescribing large amounts of oxycodone, one of the most powerful drugs ever.

Prescription pain killers, though prescribed by professional doctors, can be very dangerous when not taken correctly. Many other states have also began to take measures against these drugs, and since Florida has recently been successful, it is hoped that other states can be successful in their measures as well. Many people become addicted to prescription medications when they do not take the medicine correctly or when it is offered to them by a friend, both of which are ill-advised. Harbor Village, a luxury detox center in Southern Florida, has experienced staff members who can help anyone who is currently struggling with a prescription pain killer addiction.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/9550/20140702/deaths-in-florida-due-to-pain-killers-other-drugs-drop-thanks-to-tougher-measures.htm

Whether someone suffering from an alcohol dependency or any other drug, it is highly important to seek the professional counseling and assistance found at a qualified detox center such as Harbor Village. A 24/7 medically supervised facility, Harbor Village allows each client to receive private drug rehab in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Located in South Florida, clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations, including a suite with satellite television, 30,000 square feet of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, Internet and NetFlix access, nutritious, gourmet dining, private limo pickup and transportation to anywhere in Florida, and a results proven plan for recovery.

“Drug abuse can create many health issues and cause you to lose everything. We ask that anyone who suffers from this dependency to contact a detox center such as Harbor Village to start the recovery process,” said Robert Niznik, Harbor Village CEO.

For more information about this detox center in Florida, visit: http://www.harborvillageflorida.com or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261

Media Contact:

Robert Niznik

Harbor Village

Miami, FL

855-290-4261

robert(at)harborvillageflorida(dot)com







Florida Sees Drop in Prescription Drug Deaths

(PRWEB) July 02, 2014

As reported by Tech Times in the article, Deaths In Florida Due To Pain Killers, Other Drugs Drop Thanks To Tougher Measures, (7/2), recent statistics have found that prescription pain killer-related deaths in the state of Florida have dropped off after a dramatic increase, mostly due to the fact that state legislators have cracked down on illegal pill mills and clinics. Ever since the state put strict laws into place for requiring pain clinics to register with the state, the ability to obtain prescription pills for abuse has gotten harder. These statistics are also in part from police raids on clinics, clinic closures, and arrests of those who were pushing the pills. Law enforcement officials especially focused on doctors who were prescribing large amounts of oxycodone, one of the most powerful drugs ever.

Prescription pain killers, though prescribed by professional doctors, can be very dangerous when not taken correctly. Many other states have also began to take measures against these drugs, and since Florida has recently been successful, it is hoped that other states can be successful in their measures as well. Many people become addicted to prescription medications when they do not take the medicine correctly or when it is offered to them by a friend, both of which are ill-advised. Harbor Village, a luxury detox center in Southern Florida, has experienced staff members who can help anyone who is currently struggling with a prescription pain killer addiction.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/9550/20140702/deaths-in-florida-due-to-pain-killers-other-drugs-drop-thanks-to-tougher-measures.htm

Whether someone suffering from an alcohol dependency or any other drug, it is highly important to seek the professional counseling and assistance found at a qualified detox center such as Harbor Village. A 24/7 medically supervised facility, Harbor Village allows each client to receive private drug rehab in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Located in South Florida, clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations, including a suite with satellite television, 30,000 square feet of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, Internet and NetFlix access, nutritious, gourmet dining, private limo pickup and transportation to anywhere in Florida, and a results proven plan for recovery.

“Drug abuse can create many health issues and cause you to lose everything. We ask that anyone who suffers from this dependency to contact a detox center such as Harbor Village to start the recovery process,” said Robert Niznik, Harbor Village CEO.

For more information about this detox center in Florida, visit: http://www.harborvillageflorida.com or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261

Media Contact:

Robert Niznik

Harbor Village

Miami, FL

855-290-4261

robert(at)harborvillageflorida(dot)com







Consumer Reports Warns Against the Risks of Prescription and Over-The-Counter Painkillers


YONKERS, NY (PRWEB) July 31, 2014

Some pain relief medications can be as addictive as heroin and are rife with deadly side effects. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from legal pain pills and for each death, more than 30 people are admitted to an emergency room because of opioid complications. Consumer Reports has taken a close look at the dangers of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers and is calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to do more to make these drugs safer.

The full report, “Deadly Pain Pills” is featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports magazine and is available at http://www.ConsumerReports.org.

Consumer Reports looked at the deadly misconceptions associated with prescription opioids – including OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, and generic versions – narcotics that can make life more bearable for patients recovering from surgery or suffering from chronic pain or cancer. In addition, it identified the risks associated with taking too much acetaminophen, Tylenol and generic, a medication often renowned for its safety, as well as the inconsistent and sometimes confusing maximum daily amounts of the drug allowed by the FDA.

The use of opioids has skyrocketed in recent years with prescriptions climbing 300 percent in the past decade. Vicodin and other drugs containing the narcotic hydrocodone are now the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S. Used properly, opioids can ease severe short-term pain from, say, surgery or a broken bone, and manage chronic pain from an illness such as cancer. However, Consumer Reports has found that there are safer approaches such as using other prescription medications to treat certain conditions such as nerve pain, migraines and more, reserving opioids for flare-ups, or to start with a short-acting opioid.

When taken carefully and in the right amounts, acetaminophen is safe for pain relief for most people, even when used long-term. However, almost 80,000 people per year are treated in emergency rooms because they have taken too much of it; and acetaminophen is now the most common cause of liver failure in the U.S.

Consumer Reports believes the advice on acetaminophen packaging to “take only as directed” is confusing and conflicting. While the FDA has lowered the maximum per-pill dose of prescription acetaminophen, the agency has not yet taken the same step for over-the-counter (OTC) products.

And OTC acetaminophen drug-makers have very different notions of what people can take – some labels advise taking no more than 1,000 milligrams daily while others set the limit almost four times as high. And, accidentally taking too much acetaminophen is all too easy – it is the most common drug in the U.S., and is found as an ingredient in more than 600 OTC and prescription medications including allergy aids, cough and cold remedies, fever reducers, pain relievers and sleep aids.

“All of this doesn’t mean that everyone should avoid opioids and acetaminophen altogether,” says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., chief medical adviser for Consumer Reports. “There are safer ways of taking these medications and alternative options. But it does mean that the FDA should fulfill its role to protect consumers by taking strong steps to reduce the dangers, starting by reconsidering its approval of Zohydro ER and establishing consistent standards for acetaminophen.”

Consumer Reports is asking the FDA to make the pain-reliever market less confusing and safer for consumers by taking these first steps: Reconsidering the approval of Zohydro ER, a long-acting version of hydrocodone that the agency approved in December 2013 against the recommendation of its own panel of expert advisers, and to make acetaminophen standards consistent.

Consumer Reports also advises consumers to know the risks, not only of opioids and acetaminophen but also of drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and generic), naproxen (Aleve and generic) and Celebrex (currently prescribed only under its brand name, but it should be available in the future as a generic). Like its non-prescription cousins, Celebrex can pose risks to your heart and stomach when taken regularly, as millions of Americans do.

“Pain drugs can be as bad as the pain itself,” Lipman says. “So you need to know when they are really needed and how to use them safely.”

The full report, featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports and at http://www.ConsumerReports.org also features advice for safe opioid use and drug and nondrug measures to treat back pain, headaches, joint pain and sore muscles.







Consumer Reports Warns Against the Risks of Prescription and Over-The-Counter Painkillers


YONKERS, NY (PRWEB) July 31, 2014

Some pain relief medications can be as addictive as heroin and are rife with deadly side effects. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from legal pain pills and for each death, more than 30 people are admitted to an emergency room because of opioid complications. Consumer Reports has taken a close look at the dangers of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers and is calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to do more to make these drugs safer.

The full report, “Deadly Pain Pills” is featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports magazine and is available at http://www.ConsumerReports.org.

Consumer Reports looked at the deadly misconceptions associated with prescription opioids – including OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, and generic versions – narcotics that can make life more bearable for patients recovering from surgery or suffering from chronic pain or cancer. In addition, it identified the risks associated with taking too much acetaminophen, Tylenol and generic, a medication often renowned for its safety, as well as the inconsistent and sometimes confusing maximum daily amounts of the drug allowed by the FDA.

The use of opioids has skyrocketed in recent years with prescriptions climbing 300 percent in the past decade. Vicodin and other drugs containing the narcotic hydrocodone are now the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S. Used properly, opioids can ease severe short-term pain from, say, surgery or a broken bone, and manage chronic pain from an illness such as cancer. However, Consumer Reports has found that there are safer approaches such as using other prescription medications to treat certain conditions such as nerve pain, migraines and more, reserving opioids for flare-ups, or to start with a short-acting opioid.

When taken carefully and in the right amounts, acetaminophen is safe for pain relief for most people, even when used long-term. However, almost 80,000 people per year are treated in emergency rooms because they have taken too much of it; and acetaminophen is now the most common cause of liver failure in the U.S.

Consumer Reports believes the advice on acetaminophen packaging to “take only as directed” is confusing and conflicting. While the FDA has lowered the maximum per-pill dose of prescription acetaminophen, the agency has not yet taken the same step for over-the-counter (OTC) products.

And OTC acetaminophen drug-makers have very different notions of what people can take – some labels advise taking no more than 1,000 milligrams daily while others set the limit almost four times as high. And, accidentally taking too much acetaminophen is all too easy – it is the most common drug in the U.S., and is found as an ingredient in more than 600 OTC and prescription medications including allergy aids, cough and cold remedies, fever reducers, pain relievers and sleep aids.

“All of this doesn’t mean that everyone should avoid opioids and acetaminophen altogether,” says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., chief medical adviser for Consumer Reports. “There are safer ways of taking these medications and alternative options. But it does mean that the FDA should fulfill its role to protect consumers by taking strong steps to reduce the dangers, starting by reconsidering its approval of Zohydro ER and establishing consistent standards for acetaminophen.”

Consumer Reports is asking the FDA to make the pain-reliever market less confusing and safer for consumers by taking these first steps: Reconsidering the approval of Zohydro ER, a long-acting version of hydrocodone that the agency approved in December 2013 against the recommendation of its own panel of expert advisers, and to make acetaminophen standards consistent.

Consumer Reports also advises consumers to know the risks, not only of opioids and acetaminophen but also of drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and generic), naproxen (Aleve and generic) and Celebrex (currently prescribed only under its brand name, but it should be available in the future as a generic). Like its non-prescription cousins, Celebrex can pose risks to your heart and stomach when taken regularly, as millions of Americans do.

“Pain drugs can be as bad as the pain itself,” Lipman says. “So you need to know when they are really needed and how to use them safely.”

The full report, featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports and at http://www.ConsumerReports.org also features advice for safe opioid use and drug and nondrug measures to treat back pain, headaches, joint pain and sore muscles.







Consumer Reports Warns Against the Risks of Prescription and Over-The-Counter Painkillers


YONKERS, NY (PRWEB) July 31, 2014

Some pain relief medications can be as addictive as heroin and are rife with deadly side effects. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from legal pain pills and for each death, more than 30 people are admitted to an emergency room because of opioid complications. Consumer Reports has taken a close look at the dangers of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers and is calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to do more to make these drugs safer.

The full report, “Deadly Pain Pills” is featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports magazine and is available at http://www.ConsumerReports.org.

Consumer Reports looked at the deadly misconceptions associated with prescription opioids – including OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, and generic versions – narcotics that can make life more bearable for patients recovering from surgery or suffering from chronic pain or cancer. In addition, it identified the risks associated with taking too much acetaminophen, Tylenol and generic, a medication often renowned for its safety, as well as the inconsistent and sometimes confusing maximum daily amounts of the drug allowed by the FDA.

The use of opioids has skyrocketed in recent years with prescriptions climbing 300 percent in the past decade. Vicodin and other drugs containing the narcotic hydrocodone are now the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S. Used properly, opioids can ease severe short-term pain from, say, surgery or a broken bone, and manage chronic pain from an illness such as cancer. However, Consumer Reports has found that there are safer approaches such as using other prescription medications to treat certain conditions such as nerve pain, migraines and more, reserving opioids for flare-ups, or to start with a short-acting opioid.

When taken carefully and in the right amounts, acetaminophen is safe for pain relief for most people, even when used long-term. However, almost 80,000 people per year are treated in emergency rooms because they have taken too much of it; and acetaminophen is now the most common cause of liver failure in the U.S.

Consumer Reports believes the advice on acetaminophen packaging to “take only as directed” is confusing and conflicting. While the FDA has lowered the maximum per-pill dose of prescription acetaminophen, the agency has not yet taken the same step for over-the-counter (OTC) products.

And OTC acetaminophen drug-makers have very different notions of what people can take – some labels advise taking no more than 1,000 milligrams daily while others set the limit almost four times as high. And, accidentally taking too much acetaminophen is all too easy – it is the most common drug in the U.S., and is found as an ingredient in more than 600 OTC and prescription medications including allergy aids, cough and cold remedies, fever reducers, pain relievers and sleep aids.

“All of this doesn’t mean that everyone should avoid opioids and acetaminophen altogether,” says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., chief medical adviser for Consumer Reports. “There are safer ways of taking these medications and alternative options. But it does mean that the FDA should fulfill its role to protect consumers by taking strong steps to reduce the dangers, starting by reconsidering its approval of Zohydro ER and establishing consistent standards for acetaminophen.”

Consumer Reports is asking the FDA to make the pain-reliever market less confusing and safer for consumers by taking these first steps: Reconsidering the approval of Zohydro ER, a long-acting version of hydrocodone that the agency approved in December 2013 against the recommendation of its own panel of expert advisers, and to make acetaminophen standards consistent.

Consumer Reports also advises consumers to know the risks, not only of opioids and acetaminophen but also of drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and generic), naproxen (Aleve and generic) and Celebrex (currently prescribed only under its brand name, but it should be available in the future as a generic). Like its non-prescription cousins, Celebrex can pose risks to your heart and stomach when taken regularly, as millions of Americans do.

“Pain drugs can be as bad as the pain itself,” Lipman says. “So you need to know when they are really needed and how to use them safely.”

The full report, featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports and at http://www.ConsumerReports.org also features advice for safe opioid use and drug and nondrug measures to treat back pain, headaches, joint pain and sore muscles.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Florida Sees Drop in Prescription Drug Deaths

(PRWEB) July 02, 2014

As reported by Tech Times in the article, Deaths In Florida Due To Pain Killers, Other Drugs Drop Thanks To Tougher Measures, (7/2), recent statistics have found that prescription pain killer-related deaths in the state of Florida have dropped off after a dramatic increase, mostly due to the fact that state legislators have cracked down on illegal pill mills and clinics. Ever since the state put strict laws into place for requiring pain clinics to register with the state, the ability to obtain prescription pills for abuse has gotten harder. These statistics are also in part from police raids on clinics, clinic closures, and arrests of those who were pushing the pills. Law enforcement officials especially focused on doctors who were prescribing large amounts of oxycodone, one of the most powerful drugs ever.

Prescription pain killers, though prescribed by professional doctors, can be very dangerous when not taken correctly. Many other states have also began to take measures against these drugs, and since Florida has recently been successful, it is hoped that other states can be successful in their measures as well. Many people become addicted to prescription medications when they do not take the medicine correctly or when it is offered to them by a friend, both of which are ill-advised. Harbor Village, a luxury detox center in Southern Florida, has experienced staff members who can help anyone who is currently struggling with a prescription pain killer addiction.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/9550/20140702/deaths-in-florida-due-to-pain-killers-other-drugs-drop-thanks-to-tougher-measures.htm

Whether someone suffering from an alcohol dependency or any other drug, it is highly important to seek the professional counseling and assistance found at a qualified detox center such as Harbor Village. A 24/7 medically supervised facility, Harbor Village allows each client to receive private drug rehab in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Located in South Florida, clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations, including a suite with satellite television, 30,000 square feet of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, Internet and NetFlix access, nutritious, gourmet dining, private limo pickup and transportation to anywhere in Florida, and a results proven plan for recovery.

“Drug abuse can create many health issues and cause you to lose everything. We ask that anyone who suffers from this dependency to contact a detox center such as Harbor Village to start the recovery process,” said Robert Niznik, Harbor Village CEO.

For more information about this detox center in Florida, visit: http://www.harborvillageflorida.com or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261

Media Contact:

Robert Niznik

Harbor Village

Miami, FL

855-290-4261

robert(at)harborvillageflorida(dot)com







Purchase Xanax Without a Prescription

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There are symptoms associated with anxiety disorders and panic attacks such as: shortness of breath, excessive perspiration, dizziness, muscle tension, and trouble sleeping to mention just a few. See your healthcare professional as soon as possible if you have any of the mentioned symptoms. Unlike the minor condition we mentioned these symptoms will not get better and the condition will only worsen with time. Anxiety disorders and panic attacks can be treated successfully if you consult your healthcare professional as soon as you feel the symptoms.

When you are examined by your doctor he/she will recommend one of three, or all three treatments: medication, therapy and lifestyle change. It is difficult to change something you have been doing the better part of your life but in this case a lifestyle change may be necessary. The lifestyle change may just be one that is healthier and would include a proper diet and exercise and a change in social and personal activities. If you have a social anxiety, the therapist will work to help you overcome your fears. When medication is recommended, the medication should be Xanax.

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New Prescription Opiate Zohydro Has Strong Potential for Abuse Warns Aid in Recovery


(PRWEB) August 28, 2014

Aid in Recovery, a full service drug and alcohol treatment center, released a statement today regarding the potential for abuse of a dangerous new painkiller, Zohydro, which is marketed to chronic pain sufferers. The drug, an extended-release painkiller that contains hydrocodone, is available in doses up to 50 milligrams, which is much higher than many similar hydrocodone prescription pills.

According to the manufacturer, Zogenix, the drug was created to avoid liver damage, which is a risk with drugs that contain both hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Zohydro contains no acetaminophen, and so negates that risk.

The drug is meant to release small dosages of hydrocodone to the body over time. However, Zohydro contains no abuse-deterring properties, so addicts can easily crush up the drug and snort it to receive the entire dosage of hydrocodone immediately. The potential for abuse is alarming, and since there are so many other choices for pain medication, many of which already contain abuse-deterrents, Zohydro is a particularly dangerous and unnecessary medication. Even Zogenix’s page on Zohydro warns of addiction and abuse risks, “even at recommended doses.”

Aid in Recovery calls for heavy FDA scrutiny of Zohydro, and believes that the best solution is likely the removal of the drug from the market. Instead, medication manufacturers should focus on the creation of pain creams and other non-addictive pain solutions with limited potential for abuse.

“Zohydro is just another drug that can further prescription and opiate abuse in this country, which in recent years is such a rapidly growing epidemic,” said Michael Lukens, Psychologist at Aid in Recovery. “We need more common sense products that don’t worsen this trend, not more drugs that feed addiction and introduce new users to opiates.”

Aid in Recovery will continue to monitor the news surrounding Zohydro, and hopes to see a resolution that keeps new drugs out of the hands of prescription drug and opiate abusers. For more information on treatment and addiction programs available at Aid in Recovery, visit them at http://www.aidinrecovery.com/

About Us

Aid in Recovery is a premier drug and alcohol treatment center. Our approach is defined by recognizing each clients need for a personalized drug and alcohol treatment program. We aren’t a hospital-like institution and there’s a good reason for that. We believe that treating each client as an individual is crucial to delivering the best possible patient care. At a busy clinic-like program, it simply isn’t possible for a therapist to truly get to know each client and understand their specific needs. To best meet the needs of each patient we treat, we offer a diverse curriculum with a focus on both mind and body designed to meet the individual. We treat every patient as an individual and we work with one patient at a time and guide them to a new life in recovery. To learn more about the specifics of our program, please visit our program details page.

View our drug and alcohol treatment services or give us a call at 1-855-223-6171.







Consumer Reports Warns Against the Risks of Prescription and Over-The-Counter Painkillers


YONKERS, NY (PRWEB) July 31, 2014

Some pain relief medications can be as addictive as heroin and are rife with deadly side effects. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from legal pain pills and for each death, more than 30 people are admitted to an emergency room because of opioid complications. Consumer Reports has taken a close look at the dangers of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers and is calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to do more to make these drugs safer.

The full report, “Deadly Pain Pills” is featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports magazine and is available at http://www.ConsumerReports.org.

Consumer Reports looked at the deadly misconceptions associated with prescription opioids – including OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, and generic versions – narcotics that can make life more bearable for patients recovering from surgery or suffering from chronic pain or cancer. In addition, it identified the risks associated with taking too much acetaminophen, Tylenol and generic, a medication often renowned for its safety, as well as the inconsistent and sometimes confusing maximum daily amounts of the drug allowed by the FDA.

The use of opioids has skyrocketed in recent years with prescriptions climbing 300 percent in the past decade. Vicodin and other drugs containing the narcotic hydrocodone are now the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S. Used properly, opioids can ease severe short-term pain from, say, surgery or a broken bone, and manage chronic pain from an illness such as cancer. However, Consumer Reports has found that there are safer approaches such as using other prescription medications to treat certain conditions such as nerve pain, migraines and more, reserving opioids for flare-ups, or to start with a short-acting opioid.

When taken carefully and in the right amounts, acetaminophen is safe for pain relief for most people, even when used long-term. However, almost 80,000 people per year are treated in emergency rooms because they have taken too much of it; and acetaminophen is now the most common cause of liver failure in the U.S.

Consumer Reports believes the advice on acetaminophen packaging to “take only as directed” is confusing and conflicting. While the FDA has lowered the maximum per-pill dose of prescription acetaminophen, the agency has not yet taken the same step for over-the-counter (OTC) products.

And OTC acetaminophen drug-makers have very different notions of what people can take – some labels advise taking no more than 1,000 milligrams daily while others set the limit almost four times as high. And, accidentally taking too much acetaminophen is all too easy – it is the most common drug in the U.S., and is found as an ingredient in more than 600 OTC and prescription medications including allergy aids, cough and cold remedies, fever reducers, pain relievers and sleep aids.

“All of this doesn’t mean that everyone should avoid opioids and acetaminophen altogether,” says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., chief medical adviser for Consumer Reports. “There are safer ways of taking these medications and alternative options. But it does mean that the FDA should fulfill its role to protect consumers by taking strong steps to reduce the dangers, starting by reconsidering its approval of Zohydro ER and establishing consistent standards for acetaminophen.”

Consumer Reports is asking the FDA to make the pain-reliever market less confusing and safer for consumers by taking these first steps: Reconsidering the approval of Zohydro ER, a long-acting version of hydrocodone that the agency approved in December 2013 against the recommendation of its own panel of expert advisers, and to make acetaminophen standards consistent.

Consumer Reports also advises consumers to know the risks, not only of opioids and acetaminophen but also of drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and generic), naproxen (Aleve and generic) and Celebrex (currently prescribed only under its brand name, but it should be available in the future as a generic). Like its non-prescription cousins, Celebrex can pose risks to your heart and stomach when taken regularly, as millions of Americans do.

“Pain drugs can be as bad as the pain itself,” Lipman says. “So you need to know when they are really needed and how to use them safely.”

The full report, featured in the September 2014 issue of Consumer Reports and at http://www.ConsumerReports.org also features advice for safe opioid use and drug and nondrug measures to treat back pain, headaches, joint pain and sore muscles.