Tag Archives: National

September is National Recovery Month: What the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) Wants You to Know


Hartford, CT (PRWEB) August 30, 2014

Celebrating its 25th year, Recovery Month is a national observance that educates Americans about the fact that millions of Americans lives have been transformed by recovery, from alcohol and drug addiction and mental health disorders. Every September recovery community organizations join with treatment providers, prevention programs and other community groups to recognize the ways recovery heals individuals, families, workplaces and neighborhoods. The rallying theme for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) 2014 Recovery Month is ‘Join the Voices of Recovery: Speak Up, Reach out’, which encourages people to be vocal about their recovery and what helps them on their way. There will also be a national Rally for Recovery event this year, slated for September 20 in Kentucky, that will draw thousands of addiction recovery advocates to demonstrate that ‘Recovery Voices Count’ as leaders for their communities.

One of the ways that the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) celebrates Recovery Month is by hosting its 15th annual “Recovery Walks,” in Hartford, CT on September 19. This celebration of recovery includes live music, speakers, Faces of Recovery exhibit, arts and crafts, children’s activities, exhibitors, and more.

CCAR is an organization that envisions a world where the power, hope and healing of recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction is thoroughly understood and embraced. CCAR is a centralized resource in CT for people who are recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Whether you are contemplating a life in recovery, are new to recovery or are in long term recovery, CCAR is here to help you to navigate the recovery community, by connecting you with others in recovery and providing access area support services. Living in recovery from alcohol and other drugs is a never ending journey, and wherever you are in that journey, CCAR is here to help you meet your recovery goals.

What does CCAR do – and why do these things matter?

CCAR’s Mission

The Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) organizes the recovery community (people in recovery, family members, friends and allies) to: 1) put a face on recovery and 2) provide recovery support services.

By promoting recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction through advocacy, education and service, CCAR strives to end discrimination surrounding addiction and recovery, open new doors and remove barriers to recovery, maintain and sustain recovery regardless of the pathway, all the while ensuring that all people in recovery, and people seeking recovery, are treated with dignity and respect.

CCAR’s Values – CCAR meets people where they are. They don’t push any one form of recovery on anyone, recognizing that there are many pathways to recovery.

Many times people are left to navigate the system on their own. By the time they get to CCAR, they are frustrated, crying, discouraged. Staff and volunteers talk with them, and meet them where they are. CCAR offers the hope of a new way of living.

For more information on CCAR and the recovery services and support, please visit the website http://www.ccar.us and Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/pages/Connecticut-Community-for-Addiction-Recovery-CCAR/214943900642.

Since 1998 the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) has organized the recovery community (people in recovery, family members, friends and allies) to put a face on recovery and to provide recovery support services to help sustain recovery. By promoting recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction through advocacy, education and service, CCAR strives to end discrimination surrounding addiction and recovery, open new doors and remove barriers to recovery, maintain and sustain recovery regardless of the pathway, all the while ensuring that all people in recovery, and people seeking recovery, are treated with dignity and respect. CCAR envisions a world where the power, hope and healing of recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction is thoroughly understood and embraced. For more information, visit http://www.ccar.us.







September is National Recovery Month: What the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) Wants You to Know


Hartford, CT (PRWEB) August 30, 2014

Celebrating its 25th year, Recovery Month is a national observance that educates Americans about the fact that millions of Americans lives have been transformed by recovery, from alcohol and drug addiction and mental health disorders. Every September recovery community organizations join with treatment providers, prevention programs and other community groups to recognize the ways recovery heals individuals, families, workplaces and neighborhoods. The rallying theme for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) 2014 Recovery Month is ‘Join the Voices of Recovery: Speak Up, Reach out’, which encourages people to be vocal about their recovery and what helps them on their way. There will also be a national Rally for Recovery event this year, slated for September 20 in Kentucky, that will draw thousands of addiction recovery advocates to demonstrate that ‘Recovery Voices Count’ as leaders for their communities.

One of the ways that the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) celebrates Recovery Month is by hosting its 15th annual “Recovery Walks,” in Hartford, CT on September 19. This celebration of recovery includes live music, speakers, Faces of Recovery exhibit, arts and crafts, children’s activities, exhibitors, and more.

CCAR is an organization that envisions a world where the power, hope and healing of recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction is thoroughly understood and embraced. CCAR is a centralized resource in CT for people who are recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Whether you are contemplating a life in recovery, are new to recovery or are in long term recovery, CCAR is here to help you to navigate the recovery community, by connecting you with others in recovery and providing access area support services. Living in recovery from alcohol and other drugs is a never ending journey, and wherever you are in that journey, CCAR is here to help you meet your recovery goals.

What does CCAR do – and why do these things matter?

CCAR’s Mission

The Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) organizes the recovery community (people in recovery, family members, friends and allies) to: 1) put a face on recovery and 2) provide recovery support services.

By promoting recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction through advocacy, education and service, CCAR strives to end discrimination surrounding addiction and recovery, open new doors and remove barriers to recovery, maintain and sustain recovery regardless of the pathway, all the while ensuring that all people in recovery, and people seeking recovery, are treated with dignity and respect.

CCAR’s Values – CCAR meets people where they are. They don’t push any one form of recovery on anyone, recognizing that there are many pathways to recovery.

Many times people are left to navigate the system on their own. By the time they get to CCAR, they are frustrated, crying, discouraged. Staff and volunteers talk with them, and meet them where they are. CCAR offers the hope of a new way of living.

For more information on CCAR and the recovery services and support, please visit the website http://www.ccar.us and Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/pages/Connecticut-Community-for-Addiction-Recovery-CCAR/214943900642.

Since 1998 the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) has organized the recovery community (people in recovery, family members, friends and allies) to put a face on recovery and to provide recovery support services to help sustain recovery. By promoting recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction through advocacy, education and service, CCAR strives to end discrimination surrounding addiction and recovery, open new doors and remove barriers to recovery, maintain and sustain recovery regardless of the pathway, all the while ensuring that all people in recovery, and people seeking recovery, are treated with dignity and respect. CCAR envisions a world where the power, hope and healing of recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction is thoroughly understood and embraced. For more information, visit http://www.ccar.us.







September is National Recovery Month: What the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) Wants You to Know


Hartford, CT (PRWEB) August 30, 2014

Celebrating its 25th year, Recovery Month is a national observance that educates Americans about the fact that millions of Americans lives have been transformed by recovery, from alcohol and drug addiction and mental health disorders. Every September recovery community organizations join with treatment providers, prevention programs and other community groups to recognize the ways recovery heals individuals, families, workplaces and neighborhoods. The rallying theme for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) 2014 Recovery Month is ‘Join the Voices of Recovery: Speak Up, Reach out’, which encourages people to be vocal about their recovery and what helps them on their way. There will also be a national Rally for Recovery event this year, slated for September 20 in Kentucky, that will draw thousands of addiction recovery advocates to demonstrate that ‘Recovery Voices Count’ as leaders for their communities.

One of the ways that the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) celebrates Recovery Month is by hosting its 15th annual “Recovery Walks,” in Hartford, CT on September 19. This celebration of recovery includes live music, speakers, Faces of Recovery exhibit, arts and crafts, children’s activities, exhibitors, and more.

CCAR is an organization that envisions a world where the power, hope and healing of recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction is thoroughly understood and embraced. CCAR is a centralized resource in CT for people who are recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Whether you are contemplating a life in recovery, are new to recovery or are in long term recovery, CCAR is here to help you to navigate the recovery community, by connecting you with others in recovery and providing access area support services. Living in recovery from alcohol and other drugs is a never ending journey, and wherever you are in that journey, CCAR is here to help you meet your recovery goals.

What does CCAR do – and why do these things matter?

CCAR’s Mission

The Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) organizes the recovery community (people in recovery, family members, friends and allies) to: 1) put a face on recovery and 2) provide recovery support services.

By promoting recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction through advocacy, education and service, CCAR strives to end discrimination surrounding addiction and recovery, open new doors and remove barriers to recovery, maintain and sustain recovery regardless of the pathway, all the while ensuring that all people in recovery, and people seeking recovery, are treated with dignity and respect.

CCAR’s Values – CCAR meets people where they are. They don’t push any one form of recovery on anyone, recognizing that there are many pathways to recovery.

Many times people are left to navigate the system on their own. By the time they get to CCAR, they are frustrated, crying, discouraged. Staff and volunteers talk with them, and meet them where they are. CCAR offers the hope of a new way of living.

For more information on CCAR and the recovery services and support, please visit the website http://www.ccar.us and Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/pages/Connecticut-Community-for-Addiction-Recovery-CCAR/214943900642.

Since 1998 the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) has organized the recovery community (people in recovery, family members, friends and allies) to put a face on recovery and to provide recovery support services to help sustain recovery. By promoting recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction through advocacy, education and service, CCAR strives to end discrimination surrounding addiction and recovery, open new doors and remove barriers to recovery, maintain and sustain recovery regardless of the pathway, all the while ensuring that all people in recovery, and people seeking recovery, are treated with dignity and respect. CCAR envisions a world where the power, hope and healing of recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction is thoroughly understood and embraced. For more information, visit http://www.ccar.us.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Encourages Student Veterans to Utilize VAs GI Bill Comparison Tool


(PRWEB) August 29, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation, a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is encouraging veterans to take advantage of the VA’s improved GI Bill Comparison Tool when considering attending college.

The VA’s GI Bil Comparison Tool makes it easier for veterans and their family members to estimate their GI Bill benefits and learn more on approved colleges and universities, as well as other useful information to help them get the most out of their benefits.

The VA recently reported that in the six months since its initial launch, around 350,000 people have used this tool on their website to research schools and other pertinent GI Bill information. Among the many features of this tool is the GI Bill calculator that can provide a student veteran with the estimated tuition, housing allowance, as well as a stipend for books that they are entitled to through these benefits.

“The decision to go back to school is a big one, potentially life changing, especially for veterans with disabilities,” said DVNF CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “This is a very handy tool for veterans who are researching future college opportunities, and will help them make a more informed decision.”

VanFonda added that while DVNF’s Benefits and Resources Navigation (BaRN) program is a great way for veterans to find various resources, when it comes to education, the organization’s Navigators will refer veterans to this tool if they are interested in going to college.

DVNF also plans to launch a new guest blogging initiative at DVNF.org in the coming weeks, with veterans’ education as September’s primary theme.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Passaic County Treatment Agencies and The Recovery Community Announces the 4th Annual Recovery Walk to Celebrate National Recovery Month


Paterson, New Jersey (PRWEB) August 28, 2014

The prevalence of mental and substance use disorders is high – nearly 1 out of every 5 adults in the United States – about 43.7 million people – has a mental illness, such as depression, anxiety disorders, or schizophrenia, and approximately 22 million have been classified with substance dependence or abuse. This data is obtained as part of 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Given the widespread impact and societal cost of these behavioral health conditions, it’s important for communities to make prevention, treatment, and recovery support available and accessible for all who need them. To showcase these issues’ impact on the local community, hundreds of Passaic County residents will join forces on September 6th to celebrate National Recovery Month with an organized walk. Registration starts at 8:30 am from 77 Hamilton Street and proceeding to East Side Park in Paterson, NJ. The event is sponsored by the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Recovery Center at Eva’s Village, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD-NJ), the New Jersey Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Turning Point and Straight & Narrow.

The purpose of National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) (http://www.recoverymonth.gov) is a national observance that educates Americans on the fact that addiction treatment and mental health services can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. The observance’s main focus is to laud the gains made by those in recovery from these conditions, just as we would those who are managing other health conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Recovery Month spreads the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover.

Recovery Month highlights individuals who have reclaimed their lives and are living happy and healthy lives in long-term recovery and also honors the prevention, treatment, and recovery service providers who make recovery possible. Recovery Month promotes the message that recovery in all its forms is possible, and also encourages citizens to take action to help expand and improve the availability of effective prevention, treatment, and recovery services for those in need.

Agencies that provide treatment services and recovery supportive services in Passaic County want to raise awareness of the importance of one’s overall health and well-being, the critical need for professional treatment for those with substance use and mental disorders, and how recovery positively impacts our society as a whole.

For more information about the Passaic County Recovery Walk, call the Recovery Center at Eva’s Village at 973.754.6784.







Passaic County Treatment Agencies and The Recovery Community Announces the 4th Annual Recovery Walk to Celebrate National Recovery Month


Paterson, New Jersey (PRWEB) August 28, 2014

The prevalence of mental and substance use disorders is high – nearly 1 out of every 5 adults in the United States – about 43.7 million people – has a mental illness, such as depression, anxiety disorders, or schizophrenia, and approximately 22 million have been classified with substance dependence or abuse. This data is obtained as part of 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Given the widespread impact and societal cost of these behavioral health conditions, it’s important for communities to make prevention, treatment, and recovery support available and accessible for all who need them. To showcase these issues’ impact on the local community, hundreds of Passaic County residents will join forces on September 6th to celebrate National Recovery Month with an organized walk. Registration starts at 8:30 am from 77 Hamilton Street and proceeding to East Side Park in Paterson, NJ. The event is sponsored by the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Recovery Center at Eva’s Village, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD-NJ), the New Jersey Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Turning Point and Straight & Narrow.

The purpose of National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) (http://www.recoverymonth.gov) is a national observance that educates Americans on the fact that addiction treatment and mental health services can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. The observance’s main focus is to laud the gains made by those in recovery from these conditions, just as we would those who are managing other health conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Recovery Month spreads the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover.

Recovery Month highlights individuals who have reclaimed their lives and are living happy and healthy lives in long-term recovery and also honors the prevention, treatment, and recovery service providers who make recovery possible. Recovery Month promotes the message that recovery in all its forms is possible, and also encourages citizens to take action to help expand and improve the availability of effective prevention, treatment, and recovery services for those in need.

Agencies that provide treatment services and recovery supportive services in Passaic County want to raise awareness of the importance of one’s overall health and well-being, the critical need for professional treatment for those with substance use and mental disorders, and how recovery positively impacts our society as a whole.

For more information about the Passaic County Recovery Walk, call the Recovery Center at Eva’s Village at 973.754.6784.







Passaic County Treatment Agencies and The Recovery Community Announces the 4th Annual Recovery Walk to Celebrate National Recovery Month


Paterson, New Jersey (PRWEB) August 28, 2014

The prevalence of mental and substance use disorders is high – nearly 1 out of every 5 adults in the United States – about 43.7 million people – has a mental illness, such as depression, anxiety disorders, or schizophrenia, and approximately 22 million have been classified with substance dependence or abuse. This data is obtained as part of 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Given the widespread impact and societal cost of these behavioral health conditions, it’s important for communities to make prevention, treatment, and recovery support available and accessible for all who need them. To showcase these issues’ impact on the local community, hundreds of Passaic County residents will join forces on September 6th to celebrate National Recovery Month with an organized walk. Registration starts at 8:30 am from 77 Hamilton Street and proceeding to East Side Park in Paterson, NJ. The event is sponsored by the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Recovery Center at Eva’s Village, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD-NJ), the New Jersey Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Turning Point and Straight & Narrow.

The purpose of National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) (http://www.recoverymonth.gov) is a national observance that educates Americans on the fact that addiction treatment and mental health services can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. The observance’s main focus is to laud the gains made by those in recovery from these conditions, just as we would those who are managing other health conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Recovery Month spreads the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover.

Recovery Month highlights individuals who have reclaimed their lives and are living happy and healthy lives in long-term recovery and also honors the prevention, treatment, and recovery service providers who make recovery possible. Recovery Month promotes the message that recovery in all its forms is possible, and also encourages citizens to take action to help expand and improve the availability of effective prevention, treatment, and recovery services for those in need.

Agencies that provide treatment services and recovery supportive services in Passaic County want to raise awareness of the importance of one’s overall health and well-being, the critical need for professional treatment for those with substance use and mental disorders, and how recovery positively impacts our society as a whole.

For more information about the Passaic County Recovery Walk, call the Recovery Center at Eva’s Village at 973.754.6784.







not MY kid Launches National Back-to-School Campaign Encouraging Parents to Drug Test Their Kids

Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) August 14, 2014

With each new school year, kids will be required to pass a number of tests. None is more important than the test they’ll face when pressured to use drugs by their peers. Often a simple “no” isn’t enough to deflect peer pressure and allow a child to save face with their friends.

That’s why the national non-profit organization notMYkid (http://www.notMYkid.org/backtoschool) is launching the “Back to School” substance abuse prevention campaign and encouraging parents to drug test their children. As part of the campaign, notMYkid is giving away more than 4000 free home drug test kits, in more than a dozen U.S. cities, thanks to a donation from First Check, the leader in home diagnostic testing.

“Talking to your kids is only the first step,” said Debbie Moak, founder of notMYkid and a mother who faced her own teen son’s addiction. “We need parents to take actions — get on the same page, set consistent boundaries, drug test their kids, participate in their lives and most importantly, serve as positive role models. Through years of experience, notMYkid has found utilizing a drug test in the home helps kids avoid peer pressure situations by empowering them to say ‘No, I can’t, my parents drug test me.’”

“First Check Diagnostics has been a proud national sponsor of notMYkid for more than 10 years, thanks to the organization’s proven track record of successfully educating parents. Too often, parents have the “not my kid” mentality, thinking their kids will never try drugs. The truth is, most parents don’t know their kids have begun using drugs until the kids are two years into the addictive behavior. First Check supports notMYkid as they help parents discourage their kids from using illegal drugs,” said Pamela Ricci, Associate Marketing Manager of First Check.

Downloadable Video Clips:

Clip #1: notMYkid co-founder Debbie Moak discusses the value of home drug testing as a prevention tool and a way for kids to deflect peer pressure to use drugs. (1:20) http://vimeo.com/101411753.

Video Clip #2: notMYkid’s co-founder emphasizes the importance of awareness, education, and prevention in the battle against teen substance abuse. (:52) http://vimeo.com/101411752.

Video Clip #3: notMYkid co-founder Debbie Moak encourages parents to make this school year a success and to make prevention a priority. (:43) http://vimeo.com/101411750.

When parents choose to drug test their kids it accomplishes several important goals:

1)    Opens a dialogue between parents and kids to discuss the risks of drug use

2)    Helps kids avoid peer pressure situations by empowering them to say “No, I can’t, my parents drug test me”

3)    Alerts the parent if a child has recently used drugs so they can decide how to respond

Most parents are unaware that the average age for first-time drug experimentation is 13. When a child starts using drugs, it is typically two years before parents realize there is a problem.

notMYkid is coordinating local events and distribution efforts with local public safety agencies, schools and other organizations in more than a dozen communities across the U.S.. For a list of Cities, partners and local events visit http://notMYkid.org/backtoschool.

About notMYkid

Founded in 2000 by a Valley family to share their family’s experience with teen addiction, notMYkid is a Scottsdale-based non-profit dedicated to inspiring positive life choices by educating individuals and communities about the consequences of destructive youth behaviors such as substance abuse, body image, unhealthy relationships, bullying, depression, and internet safety. In an effort to promote prevention messages, notMYkid increases awareness of the challenges kids face, provides information and offers resources to support the success of students, families, and educators. For more information visit http://notMYkid.org.







not MY kid Launches National Back-to-School Campaign Encouraging Parents to Drug Test Their Kids

Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) August 14, 2014

With each new school year, kids will be required to pass a number of tests. None is more important than the test they’ll face when pressured to use drugs by their peers. Often a simple “no” isn’t enough to deflect peer pressure and allow a child to save face with their friends.

That’s why the national non-profit organization notMYkid (http://www.notMYkid.org/backtoschool) is launching the “Back to School” substance abuse prevention campaign and encouraging parents to drug test their children. As part of the campaign, notMYkid is giving away more than 4000 free home drug test kits, in more than a dozen U.S. cities, thanks to a donation from First Check, the leader in home diagnostic testing.

“Talking to your kids is only the first step,” said Debbie Moak, founder of notMYkid and a mother who faced her own teen son’s addiction. “We need parents to take actions — get on the same page, set consistent boundaries, drug test their kids, participate in their lives and most importantly, serve as positive role models. Through years of experience, notMYkid has found utilizing a drug test in the home helps kids avoid peer pressure situations by empowering them to say ‘No, I can’t, my parents drug test me.’”

“First Check Diagnostics has been a proud national sponsor of notMYkid for more than 10 years, thanks to the organization’s proven track record of successfully educating parents. Too often, parents have the “not my kid” mentality, thinking their kids will never try drugs. The truth is, most parents don’t know their kids have begun using drugs until the kids are two years into the addictive behavior. First Check supports notMYkid as they help parents discourage their kids from using illegal drugs,” said Pamela Ricci, Associate Marketing Manager of First Check.

Downloadable Video Clips:

Clip #1: notMYkid co-founder Debbie Moak discusses the value of home drug testing as a prevention tool and a way for kids to deflect peer pressure to use drugs. (1:20) http://vimeo.com/101411753.

Video Clip #2: notMYkid’s co-founder emphasizes the importance of awareness, education, and prevention in the battle against teen substance abuse. (:52) http://vimeo.com/101411752.

Video Clip #3: notMYkid co-founder Debbie Moak encourages parents to make this school year a success and to make prevention a priority. (:43) http://vimeo.com/101411750.

When parents choose to drug test their kids it accomplishes several important goals:

1)    Opens a dialogue between parents and kids to discuss the risks of drug use

2)    Helps kids avoid peer pressure situations by empowering them to say “No, I can’t, my parents drug test me”

3)    Alerts the parent if a child has recently used drugs so they can decide how to respond

Most parents are unaware that the average age for first-time drug experimentation is 13. When a child starts using drugs, it is typically two years before parents realize there is a problem.

notMYkid is coordinating local events and distribution efforts with local public safety agencies, schools and other organizations in more than a dozen communities across the U.S.. For a list of Cities, partners and local events visit http://notMYkid.org/backtoschool.

About notMYkid

Founded in 2000 by a Valley family to share their family’s experience with teen addiction, notMYkid is a Scottsdale-based non-profit dedicated to inspiring positive life choices by educating individuals and communities about the consequences of destructive youth behaviors such as substance abuse, body image, unhealthy relationships, bullying, depression, and internet safety. In an effort to promote prevention messages, notMYkid increases awareness of the challenges kids face, provides information and offers resources to support the success of students, families, and educators. For more information visit http://notMYkid.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Attending National Veterans Wheelchair Games


Washington, DC (PRWEB) August 14, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, announces it will attend the National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Philadelphia, PA.

The National Veterans Wheelchair Games is the largest annual wheelchair sports competition of its kind in the world.Each year more than 500 novice and experienced athletes meet for a week of archery, swimming, weightlifting, basketball, quad rugby, track, field, and more. Throughout the week, veterans realize their abilities and potential while enjoying the spirit of healthy activity and fellowship. The Department of Veterans Affairs and Paralyzed Veterans of America have co-presented the Games since 1985.

Among those competing in the games is Dr. Rory Cooper, the Director of the Human Engineering Research Laboratories (HERL), and disabled U.S. Army veteran. DVNF is currently raising $ 50,000 for Dr. Cooper’s team so they can purchase new equipment needed for their research and development on behalf of veterans with disabilities.

“The National Veterans Wheelchair Games are a great opportunity for disabled veterans to compete and overcome challenges through tremendous camaraderie,” said DVNF CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “We are thrilled to be a part of this event, and look forward to expressing our thanks to these veterans.”

DVNF will be on site during the week to offer support to the competitors at the games, offering various Health and Comfort items. DVNF brought 200 care kits to the event, which will be useful to the competitors. The games will last for the rest of the week.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.