Tag Archives: National

Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Disabled Veterans National Foundation Expresses Approval of New Department of Veterans’ Affairs Initiative to Support Veterans in Rural Areas


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 22, 2014

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (http://www.dvnf.org), a nonprofit veterans service organization that provides critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom, is expressing its approval of the VA’s new Highly Rural Transportation Grants program.

This new initiative will allow veterans in remote areas to get free transportation to their VA medical appointments. Through 11 grants of up to $ 50,000 to various organizations to contract transportation services, thousands of veterans will benefit from rides to and from their appointments, despite their geographic location.

According to the VA’s release, 25 states contain counties in highly rural areas. Among these states include: Texas, Oregon, Alaska, Montana, Nevada, Maine, Idaho, and North Dakota.

“The VA offers many services that are valuable, but transportation to VA appointments is one area that many veterans grapple with frequently,” said DVNF’s CEO, Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.). “Veterans in remote areas are at an even greater disadvantage, which is why this program will be so important. Hopefully it will be expanded in the future.”

This program gives State Veterans Service Agencies and other veteran service organizations the opportunity to offer this transportation through their own innovative means that will expand services to veterans. The VA offered six grants in August, and another five in September for this initiative.

About DVNF:

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:


    Providing personalized counseling to assist veterans in navigating the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service.
    Offering direct financial support to veterans and other veteran organizations to address the issues that align with the DVNF mission.
    Providing supplemental assistance through the Health & Comfort program and Empowerment Webinars.
    Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community.

For more, go to http://www.dvnf.org.







Ohio AAP Promotes National Teen Driver Safety Week


Columbus, OH (PRWEB) October 20, 2014

National Teen Driver Safety Week is October 19-25, 2014 and the Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Ohio AAP, http://www.ohioaap.org) is joining the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in encouraging parents of teen drivers to talk to their teens and always set the rules before they hit the road.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. In 2012, there were 2,055 teen drivers involved in fatal crashes, and 859 (42%) of those teen drivers were killed in crashes. While we can’t prevent all of these fatalities, surveys show that teens whose parents impose driving restrictions typically engage in less risky driving and are involved in fewer crashes.

“We want parents to recognize that even though their teens might be gaining some independence as they reach driving age, it is important now more than ever that they stay involved and closely monitor their young drivers,” said Dr. Mike Gittelman, MD FAAP, emergency medicine physician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and chair of the Ohio AAP Injury Prevention Committee. “Teens are still kids. They still need rules and restrictions, and believe it or not, teens do listen to their parents.”

Parents have a responsibility to talk to their teen drivers about the rules outlined in Ohio’s graduated driver licensing (GDL) law and to enforce them. But sadly, according to the NHTSA, only about 25 percent of parents have serious talks with their kids about safe driving.

The Ohio AAP program, PACT for Safe Driving, is centered around a parent-teen driving contract, which is designed to help parents start these critically important conversations and work with their teens to set clear driving privileges as they gain experience. The contract includes Ohio AAP recommendations for several key areas, including: distracted driving, night-time driving, alcohol use, seat belt use and number of passengers in the car. These recommendations are based on research-based safety literature and, in many cases, are more thorough than the current GDL laws.

For more information about teen driving, including Ohio data and statistics, risk factors and Ohio’s Graduated Driver’s License Laws, and to download a parent-teen driving contract that can help parents set appropriate rules and consequences, visit: http://ohioaap.org/teendriving/.    

The Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Ohio AAP) promotes the health, safety and well-being of children and adolescents so they may reach their full potential. The Ohio AAP works to accomplish this by addressing the needs of children, their families, and their communities, and by supporting Chapter members through advocacy, education, research, service, and improving the systems through which they deliver pediatric care.

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Ohio AAP Promotes National Teen Driver Safety Week


Columbus, OH (PRWEB) October 20, 2014

National Teen Driver Safety Week is October 19-25, 2014 and the Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Ohio AAP, http://www.ohioaap.org) is joining the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in encouraging parents of teen drivers to talk to their teens and always set the rules before they hit the road.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. In 2012, there were 2,055 teen drivers involved in fatal crashes, and 859 (42%) of those teen drivers were killed in crashes. While we can’t prevent all of these fatalities, surveys show that teens whose parents impose driving restrictions typically engage in less risky driving and are involved in fewer crashes.

“We want parents to recognize that even though their teens might be gaining some independence as they reach driving age, it is important now more than ever that they stay involved and closely monitor their young drivers,” said Dr. Mike Gittelman, MD FAAP, emergency medicine physician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and chair of the Ohio AAP Injury Prevention Committee. “Teens are still kids. They still need rules and restrictions, and believe it or not, teens do listen to their parents.”

Parents have a responsibility to talk to their teen drivers about the rules outlined in Ohio’s graduated driver licensing (GDL) law and to enforce them. But sadly, according to the NHTSA, only about 25 percent of parents have serious talks with their kids about safe driving.

The Ohio AAP program, PACT for Safe Driving, is centered around a parent-teen driving contract, which is designed to help parents start these critically important conversations and work with their teens to set clear driving privileges as they gain experience. The contract includes Ohio AAP recommendations for several key areas, including: distracted driving, night-time driving, alcohol use, seat belt use and number of passengers in the car. These recommendations are based on research-based safety literature and, in many cases, are more thorough than the current GDL laws.

For more information about teen driving, including Ohio data and statistics, risk factors and Ohio’s Graduated Driver’s License Laws, and to download a parent-teen driving contract that can help parents set appropriate rules and consequences, visit: http://ohioaap.org/teendriving/.    

The Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Ohio AAP) promotes the health, safety and well-being of children and adolescents so they may reach their full potential. The Ohio AAP works to accomplish this by addressing the needs of children, their families, and their communities, and by supporting Chapter members through advocacy, education, research, service, and improving the systems through which they deliver pediatric care.

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