Tag Archives: Narconon

Narconon Survey Confirms Pervasive Prescription Drug Abuse by Young Americans

(PRWEB) June 06, 2013

According to the Partnership at Drugfree.org, there are more teens misusing and abusing prescription drugs than ever before. In April 2013, this non-profit organization published their annual Partnership Attitude Tracking Survey (PATS) that showed that one in four American teens has misused or abused a prescription drug. This figure increased 33% over the prior five years. To verify this information, the records of rehab admissions at the Narconon Arrowhead rehabilitation facility were combed to determine how many young admissions fit this pattern. An overwhelming 89% of young adults who were admitted to this rehab reported prescription drug abuse and addiction – usually years of this addictive habit.

These admissions were part of a larger tabulation of the drug abuse history of treatment admissions. Those selected out were between the ages of 18 and 22 years of age when they arrived. The lists of prescription drugs that had been abused at this tender age were astonishing. Drug abuse histories like these were all-too typical:

C was a 21-year-old male whose major addiction was to opiates. He had abused them daily for three years before arriving at Narconon Arrowhead. He’d tried cocaine but it caused him to have seizures. The list of opiates he had abused included methadone, Lortab, OxyContin, Darvocet, fentanyl, tramadol, Norco, Percocet, codeine, Subutex and Suboxone. In previous attempts to get sober, he had been given Xanax, Seroquel, Klonopin and Ativan in detox facilities. C had received tickets for 15 major driving violations and had been charged with three DUIs.

K was a 22-year-old female who had been abusing opiates for ten years when she arrived at Narconon Arrowhead. Her list included heroin, morphine, Dilaudid, Percocet, Demerol, Darvon, Darvocet, codeine, OxyContin, Subutex, Suboxone, opium, hydrocodone, tramadol, Norco and Lortab. A few days a month, she added Xanax, Klonopin or Valium. She had also abused methamphetamine, Ritalin and Adderall. At one point, she had a $ 900/day drug habit. She made money taking people to unscrupulous doctors so she could acquire pills that could be sold to other addicts.

“Many of these prescription drugs are so addictive that it does not take much abuse before a young person totally loses the power of choice,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “Once this trap slams shut, these young people may quickly spiral down into horrifying levels of drug use or even death. But we have found that even these cases can recover, when given enough time and a thorough enough approach to recovery.”

The PATS survey also showed that only 16 percent of parents discuss the dangers of prescription painkillers and even fewer discuss other types of prescription drugs. To help parents know how to start talking to their children about these drugs, Narconon International has created a guide called Ten Things Parents May Not Know about Prescription Drug Abuse. This free downloadable guide can be obtained at http://www.narconon.org/drug-abuse/10-things-prescription-drugs.html.

“It’s not easy to protect your children from abuse of drugs and alcohol,” added Carr. “At Narconon International, we are doing everything we can to help, including publishing a variety of guides to help parents eliminate the possibility of drug abuse or addiction among their children.”

In addition to the guide on prescription drug abuse, there are others advising parents on what they need to know about marijuana, recommending ways to protect children from drug abuse over the summer and helping families who are dealing with addiction to know what to do. These new Narconon® materials are available on http://www.narconon.org/drug-abuse/parent-center.html.

For more information on Narconon, call 1-800-775-8750 or visit http://www.narconon.org.







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Narconon Arrowhead Issues Warning As Painkiller Admissions Increase


Canadian, Oklahoma (PRWEB) February 13, 2014

According to the CDC (The Center for Disease Control and Prevention), deaths from prescription painkillers have reached epidemic levels in the past decade. The number of overdose deaths has become greater than deaths from heroin and cocaine combined. A big part of the problem is the nonmedical use of prescription painkillers—using drugs without a prescription, or using drugs just for the “high” they cause. Approximately 12 million Americans (age 12 or older) reported nonmedical use of prescription painkillers in the past year. Oklahoma ranks amongst the nation’s highest in number of prescription pain killer related deaths and pills sold [1].

It is well known that opiate-based painkillers such as morphine, Vicodin, Percocet, Roxicodone and OxyContin are addictive, which is why they are schedule II & III narcotics and have very strict laws controlling their sale and usage [2]. Yet, it is interesting that in 1995 the FDA approved OxyContin [3], a highly addictive opiate-based drug, and shortly after from 1998 to 2010, the production of these drugs increased 10 times [4]. Also, during that same time period, according to the CDC, overall drug overdose rates have skyrocketed [1].

Statistical Evidence of Increased Painkiller Admissions

There is statistical evidence that there is now an increase in people seeking treatment for are seeing prescription opiate addictions [1].

Narconon Arrowhead of Oklahoma is seeing the trend changing over the last 10 years. They, are amongst the many treatment providers thatare experiencing a large number of clients entering their program, who have first starting down the path of addiction through prescription painkillers. When they can no longer get legal prescriptions, then they often either obtain the prescription drugs illegally or they turn to illegal opiate-based drugs, such as heroin to reduce the painful drug withdrawal symptoms that accompany opiate addiction. That is the dwindling spiral of drug abuse, which can lead to overdose and death if not properly treated.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends better access to substance abuse treatment, stating that effective, accessible substance abuse treatment programs could reduce overdose among people struggling with dependence and addiction and they encourage states to increase access to these important programs.

For more information on heroin addiction or on Narconon Arrowhead’s effective approach to opiate addiction, please visit their site at http://www.narcononarrowhead.org or call 800-468-6933.

1.    Center for Disease Control and Prevention – Prescription Painkiller Overdoses in the US: http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/PainkillerOverdoses/

2.    Drug Enforcement Agency – Drug Scheduling: http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ds.shtml

3.    Wikipedia – Oxycodone- History: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxycontin#OxyContin

4.    Wikipedia – Oxycodone- Statistics: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxycontin#OxyContin







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Narconon New Life Retreat Celebrates Its 8th Anniversary


Denham Springs, LA (PRWEB) July 03, 2014

Narconon New Life Retreat, having graduated over 600 students since its inception, now celebrates its 8th year anniversary. The growth during the years since the grand opening have witnessed the substance abuse facility expanding from a licensed 16 bed facility to one that services an average of 55 clients per week, both inpatient and outpatient.

With students from as far away as Hawaii and Alaska to as near as the community they call home, Denham Springs, Narconon Louisiana has provided a non-traditional and successful treatment program, with the majority of its graduates going on to live happy, healthy and drug free lives. This year’s anniversary is marked by the 640th graduate, TS from Michigan.

“I have done a lot of programs in my life and the Narconon program is the only one that got me back to the top,” says TS in his recent graduation speech. “It took some work, but it all paid off in the end. I even got my dream job of being a Chef which would not have been possible without this program. Everything that I learned gave me the tools to be truly happy in life.”

Narconon Louisiana was founded in 2006, shortly after Hurricane Katrina relocated hundreds of thousands of south Louisiana residents as well as leaving thousands of substance abusers with little option for recovery. “It quickly became apparent that the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina included a shortage of options for those suffering from alcohol and drug abuse. Living through and observing the need for help, planted the seeds which evolved into Narconon Louisiana,” says Dr. Rohit Adi, Founding Member and Medical Director of the facility. “I am truly thankful we have been able to provide real assistance to addicts so they live productive, happy lives. When I hear the stories of each Narconon client’s journey towards a sober, productive life, I know I am making a difference, one addict at a time.”

One addict at a time. An addict as recent as TS or as early as CM, a 2010 Narconon graduate who reminisces, “Drugs are so far from me now – I no longer have any part of that life. It’s been almost four years and I am still clean. I have my family and my kids and I am productive. I have my life back!”

About Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat

Narconon Louisiana, located in Denham Springs, is a non-profit alcohol and drug rehabilitation center licensed by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. The Narconon drug rehabilitation and education program was founded in 1966 by William Benitez and uses the drug-free rehabilitation and social education methodology based on research developed by American author and humanitarian, L. Ron Hubbard. They are dedicated to eliminating alcohol and addiction through drug prevention education and rehabilitation. If you know someone struggling with alcohol addiction or drug abuse and would like more information visit http://www.DrugAbuseSolution.com or call 877-340-3602. Any questions you have in the matter will be addressed in confidence.







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Former Narconon Arrowhead Patient Speaks for First Time on His Recovery from Heroin Addiction


(PRWEB) April 14, 2014

The nationwide heroin epidemic has affected millions of life. Reports from the National Institute on Drug Abuse report that one out of 15 people that use prescriptions will try the drug within 10 years. What’s worse is that we are losing lives every day to a problem that can be remedied with successful rehabilitation.

Meet Joseph. Joseph had taken heroin intravenously for over twenty years. He recently completed the Narconon Arrowhead program; and decided to publicly for the first time to discuss his addiction and recovery because so many people are struggling with heroin issues.

During the time when he used heroin, he had been to prison, funerals for “friends” (other addicts), ICU, and many of the other places frequented by drug addicts. No matter how many rehabilitation facilities he went to or how many treatment programs he participated in, Joseph was unable to resolve his heroin addiction. That is, until he was admitted for treatment at Narconon Arrowhead.

At Narconon, Joseph was able to take a look at his life and confront what was occurring in it. He could see where he had been and who he had become, and figure out who he really wanted to be and where he wanted to go in life. He gained new tools for his life, new abilities to communicate with others around him, and new skills to handle the problems in life and achieve his goals. After nearly three decades of taking from society and the world around him, Joseph was able to give back to others at Narconon by helping them accomplish what he had accomplished on his program. Now that he has graduated from the program and conquered his heroin addiction, Joseph feels that Narconon is undoubtedly the best rehabilitation program in the world – simply because it worked when none other could.

About Narconon Arrowhead

In treating heroin addiction, many rehabilitation facilities and programs recommend a substitute medication program. This type of program aims to bring the individual down off their heroin addiction without having to experience some of the more intensely painful withdrawal symptoms, including restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes, goose bumps, severe cravings and more. However, many of these substitute medications, like methadone, carry their own risks of tolerance, dependence and addiction, and can therefore act only to replace the individual’s heroin addiction with another addiction, rather than helping them successfully achieve full sobriety from drugs.

The true goal of a rehabilitation facility would be to help an individual achieve full sobriety from all drugs, and gain the knowledge they need to confidently pursue a healthy, productive future. This is the goal of Narconon Arrowhead treatment. And, based on staff and client surveys, recent outcome studies and patient reviews the facility does this with 70% reporting drug abstinence from several months to many years after successful completion of the program.

For more information on Narconon Arrowhead call 800-468-6933 or log into http://www.narcononarrowhead.org.

Sources:

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/heroin

http://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/infographics/abuse-prescription-pain-medications-risks-heroin-use







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Narconon Freedom Center Focuses on Prescription Warnings During National Safety Month


Albion, MI (PRWEB) May 30, 2014

The National Safety Council sponsors the month of June as National Safety Month. As part of the U.S Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the National Safety Council cites injuries as a leading cause of disability for Americans of all ages, as well as a leading cause of death for those aged 1 to 44. The agency also notes that many injuries can be prevented when safe practices are implemented.

Safety Issues

During National Safety Month, people are encouraged to become informed as to the important safety issues highlighted as those worthy of attention and raised awareness. Issues cited specifically included prescription drug abuse.

Prescription Drug Abuse

Some prescription drugs, commonly referred to as “medications,” have psychoactive or mind-altering properties. For this reason, these drugs lend themselves to use and abuse by individuals taking them for non-medical reasons or in ways or amounts not intended by a prescribing doctor.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse in their Research Report on How Many People Abuse Prescription Drugs that was published in October of 2011, prescription drugs as well as OTC (over-the-counter) drugs are the most commonly abused substances by Americans aged 14 and older, after marijuana and alcohol. [Source: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/prescription-drugs/trends-in-prescription-drug-abuse/how-many-people-abuse-prescription-drugs

The organization goes onto say that the most commonly abused prescription drugs are the class of opioid pain relievers such as OxyContin or Vicodin, the stimulant prescription drugs used for treating ADHD such as Ritalin, Concerta or Adderall, and the CNS (Central Nervous System) depressants used for anxiety relief, such as Xanax or Valium.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse in their Topics in Brief Prescription Drug Abuse piece, published December 2011, says that the most commonly abused OTC (over-the counter) drugs are the cold and cough medicines which contain dextromethorphan, a cough suppressant which has the potential for abuse as a recreational drug due to its euphoric and hallucinogenic properties when used in high doses. [Source: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/topics-in-brief/prescription-drug-abuse

Narconon Freedom Center’s Warning

As a long-term residential drug rehab facility in Michigan dedicated to helping addicts reclaim their lives from addiction, the executives and staff of Narconon Freedom Center have extensive experience in the consequences of prescription drug abuse, and the dangers of easily becoming addicted to these narcotic painkillers.

In an effort to raise awareness and help to prevent the suffering and heartache caused by prescription drug abuse and addition, Narconon Freedom Center cautions people that it is a misconception that prescription drugs are safer than illicit drugs, emphasizing that they are potentially highly addictive, put the user at risk of adverse health effects, and when used in combination with alcohol or other drugs can result in overdose and death.

Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention

Narconon Freedom Center also sends its message of prevention actions which people can take in an effort to remain safe from the consequences of prescription drug abuse and addiction.

The center executives and staff caution against taking a prescription medication (drug) which has been prescribed to someone else, pointing out that most teens abusing prescription drugs get them free from a relative or friend.

They also caution against taking a prescription medication (drug) in any manner other than prescribed. Most prescription drugs are dispensed to be taken orally in tablets, and not crushed for snorting or injecting, which speeds-up and amplifies its effects, with consequent risks.

The center’s parting caution is to never take a prescription drug for any other purpose than that for which it was prescribed. It is known that any of the prescription drug-types mentioned herein are capable of producing a high, the main reason for potential abuse.

But the main warning is the fact that the real cost of prescription drug abuse and its artificial and temporary high, is all too frequently a life.

For further information on or help with prescription drug abuse, please contact Narconon Freedom Center toll-free at 1-877-362-9682 or visit their website at http://www.narcononfreedomcenter.org/.







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To an African Country in Difficulty, Narconon Brings the Light of Drug Prevention


(PRWEB) July 01, 2014

Liberia, on the West Coast of Africa, has been through serious struggles in the last few decades. After two civil wars, Liberia has suffered losses in infrastructure that left it vulnerable to international crime. Drug traffickers exploited Liberia’s weaknesses to acquire personnel and resources to move their Afghan heroin through to the US and South American cocaine into Europe. Seeing that his neighboring country had so few resources to help its population, Joseph Appiah of Narconon Ghana decided to bring in his drug prevention organization.

On this year’s United Nations Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, Mr. Appiah presented a public awareness drug-fighting event jointly with the Liberian Drug Enforcement Administration. Also speaking at the event were representatives from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the U.S. Embassy.

Each representative pledged his or her support in Liberia’s fight against drug abuse, a problem requiring coordinated effort to overcome. Since the end of the civil wars, many former soldiers have struggled with addiction to the same drugs they were given by their unit commanders to forcibly, chemically stimulate more aggression. A growing number of younger Liberians have also begin to use drugs, especially locally grown marijuana or synthetics. There are few opportunities for young people in Liberia. As elsewhere in the world, no productive work contributes to making young people susceptible to drug dealers or criminals.

Many members of the Liberian police force joined the anti-drug parade through the streets of Monrovia as well as at a Narconon drug education presentation at S.W. Tubman Senior High School. As the parade made its way through the Monrovia streets, a large banner invited spectators to join them at the high school. “Come one, come all and join the fight against drugs, substance abuse and illicit trafficking,” the banner read.

“Like his Narconon drug education colleagues in South Africa, Nigeria, and Uganda, Joseph Appiah is spreading the Narconon positive message that being drug-free is a healthier, safer and more ethical way to live,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “We are very proud of Joe’s determination to make a difference in Western Africa and highly commend him for his successes garnering the attention of so many people to back up drug education as a primary tool to reduce drug abuse in Liberia.”

For the last decade, Mr. Appiah has been delivering Narconon drug prevention lessons to schoolchildren throughout Ghana. “But I always had the intention to expand our help to Liberian youth,” Appiah said. “It was not hard at all to recruit willing Liberians to train up in Narconon techniques to spread understandable, drug-free messages.” Mr. Appiah used this United Nations event to let people know about the founding of this new drug prevention group, Narconon Liberia, and to introduce its staff.

“We wish our colleague Mr. Appiah every success in the establishment and expansion of his new organization and look forward to hearing future news of more educational and public awareness events,” added Mr. Carr.

Internationally, there are more than 100 Narconon centers offering either residential drug rehabilitation or drug prevention services to students, adults, businesses, and government agencies. Founded in 1966 and based on the work and research of American philosopher, L. Ron Hubbard, the Narconon program has helped tens of thousands of people to recover from addiction and reached millions of individuals with drug education. For more information, call 1-800-775-8750 or visit http://www.narconon.org.







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Narconon Arrowhead Releases New Information on Two-Step Drug-free Detoxification Process


Canadian, Oklahoma (PRWEB) March 17, 2014

Narconon Arrowhead utilizes an innovative two-phase, holistic, drug-free method of detoxification to cleanse the body of drug residuals and reduce withdrawal symptoms. They have been using their drug-free method for almost five decades and it has helped them avoid the side effects, withdrawal symptoms and the potential for abuse of the many substitute drugs that can be utilized for drug detoxification purposes. The facility is now releasing new and additional information on the process and why it is successful.

Heroin is referred to as an opiate meaning it is derived from the opium poppy and it is also an opioid which includes opiates and semi-synthetic opioids such as Vicodin (hydrocodone) or OxyContin (oxycodone). Although these semi-synthetic drugs are legal prescription painkillers, they very similar to heroin and have similar effects such as a decreased perception of pain, feelings of euphoria, potential for addiction and cause severe drug withdrawal symptoms.(1) According to the latest data by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), nearly four out of five people who recently started using heroin used prescription painkillers first. (2)

Drug withdrawal refers to the symptoms that one can experience after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease in the intake of medications or recreational drugs to which one has formed a dependence.(3) Opioid withdrawal has often been compared to having very severe flu symptoms. Opioid withdrawal symptoms include restlessness, muscle and joint aches, nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea, anxiety, sweating and chills. These symptoms are so excruciating that it makes quitting the drugs very difficult to confront.

Also, after the acute symptoms have subsided, remaining symptoms such as anxiety, depression, insomnia, cravings, low self-esteem and others can persist.(4)

Part of the trap of opioid addiction is that, although these drugs cause these severe drug withdrawal symptoms, taking more of them also alleviates those withdrawal symptoms. The addiction persists as the addict continues to use the drugs, even though their drug use may be causing detrimental consequences, to avoid the pain and suffering caused by the drug withdrawal symptoms.

Why Drug Detox is Used

Drug detoxification is used to reduce or relieve drug withdrawal symptoms while helping the addicted individual adjust to living without drug use. Detoxification may be achieved in a drug-free manner or medications can be used as a form of treatment. The biochemistry definition of detoxification is the metabolic process by which toxins are changed into less toxic or more readily excretable substances.

The latter definition is the approach taken by Narconon Arrowhead and is further explained in their book, The Truth About Becoming Addicted: The theory is that drug residuals or toxins remain in the body and sustain the addiction until they can be changed through a specialized detoxification method into less toxic substances and excreted from the body. When drugs first enter the body of a drug user, they are recognized by the body as poisons and metabolized by the organs to be eliminated. Yet, residual amounts can remain behind in fat cells and other body organs and store in the body for some time after use. These drug residuals have the potential to act as a physical level reminder that can trigger strong thoughts to use drugs in a substance abuser long after they have stopped using drugs. This is commonly referred to as a craving. These cravings can be triggered at times when a person undergoes periods of physical or emotional stress.

Narconon Arrowhead’s Approach to Physical Detox

Narconon Arrowhead approaches full physical detoxification from drugs and alcohol in a very specific two phase approach. The first phase is to get the person to stop using and dry them out so there are no physical and/or mental side effects present from coming off drugs or alcohol. Once this dry out process is completed and the individual has been seen by a medical professional and deemed physically able to proceed, they move into the next phase of Narconon Arrowhead’s detoxification process, known as the New Life Detoxification program. In this phase of detoxification, a combination of light aerobic exercise, a low heat dry sauna, and a specific nutritional regime that is designed to decrease physical and mental cravings from drugs or alcohol is used.

One addict we will call Joe for anonymity said, “After I dried out and started the sauna detoxification program, I really noticed a big difference. I finally could sleep again, my body aches went away, I wasn’t so anxious, I started eating better and pretty soon I was feeling more and more normal. My energy also started to come back and my body and skin looked and felt like it used to when I was younger. And, this was all done by getting all the toxins and drugs out of my body rather than by putting more in. It was truly amazing!”

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends better access to substance abuse treatment, stating that effective, accessible substance abuse treatment programs could reduce overdose among people struggling with dependence and addiction and they encourage states to increase access to these important programs.

For more information on Narconon Arrowhead’s effective detoxification method for opiate addiction, please visit their site at http://www.narcononarrowhead.org or call 800-468-6933.

1.    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opiate

2.    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/2k13/DataReview/DR006/nonmedical-pain-reliever-use-2013.htm

3.    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_withdrawal

4.    http://www.opiateaddictionresource.com/addiction/opioid_withdrawal







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Narconon Louisiana Applauds Governor Jindals’s Decision to Tackle the Rise of Black Tar Heroin in Louisiana by Signing a New Bill Into Law


Denham Springs, LA (PRWEB) June 18, 2014

On Friday, May 30, 2014, Governor Bobby Jindal signed into law a bill which increased the penalties for repeat offenders guilty of heroin distribution from 50 years to 99 years. This a complete reversal of the sentencing reform that Louisiana Legislature passed a few years ago which had actually lowered the penalty for heroin distribution from a life sentence to 50 years. This newer, aggressive stance is largely due to the spike in heroin use across Louisiana, with over 144 heroin overdose deaths in 2013.

East Baton Rouge Parish coroner Dr. Beau Clark has advocated for harsher sentences for convicted heroin dealers, and stated, “Typically, heroin users don’t use and users don’t deal, meaning addicts need treatment more than they need jail time.”

Claire Madden, Narconon Louisiana graduate and past heroin user who is sober for over 5 years, concurs saying, “I know first-hand that treatment works. This has been the primary motivation I have used as I am completing my degree on the path to becoming a licensed counselor so I may provide others the help I received through treatment.”

Narconon Louisiana has begun a month long campaign to bring awareness to the problem of drug addiction and specifically to combat the rise in heroin overdose in our home state. By providing information highlighting the physiological effects of heroin the reader will become more aware of how to detect heroin abuse around them.

You can find more information about Heroin addiction by visiting the heroin information page on Narconon New Life Retreats home page.

Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat, located in Denham Springs is a non-profit alcohol and drug rehabilitation center dedicated to eliminating alcohol and drug addiction through drug prevention education and rehabilitation.







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Narconon Network Celebrates UNODC Day Against Drugs with Continuing Drug Education Results


(PRWEB) June 25, 2014

Around the world this June 26th, Narconon centers will participate in events and observances marking the annual International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking established by the United Nations. As in years past, Narconon staff and volunteers will take to the streets, go to youth clubs, and participate in community awareness events. In countries as diverse as Ghana, Uganda, Colombia, Nepal, Mexico, Denmark, Pakistan and across the US, lessons and drug education materials will be delivered to public – young and old alike – as well as to law enforcement personnel, local officials and legislators, sometimes at international events.

This year, Narconon Ghana highlights the types of drug prevention and humanitarian aid projects that Narconon staff and volunteers contribute to their societies. Director Joe Appiah will be speaking by invitation to numerous Liberian and nearby African country officials including UNODC staff at their June 26th event. Narconon, he will announce, will shortly begin to train Liberian organizations in the Narconon First Step Program, a humane and healthy way of to help alcoholics and other drug addicts to get through withdrawal less painfully and more rapidly in order to start on a new sober path. Elsewhere, these Narconon techniques have been adopted by more than 150 Christian Twelve Step programs in Mexico as useful adjuncts to their regimens. Mr. Appiah has spent well over a decade delivering drug education talks across Central Western Africa. Across Africa, 74,000 young people received lectures in the last two years alone.

“We are proud to work side by side with goodhearted persons like Joe Appiah as well as thousands of others worldwide who have dedicated themselves to saving lives from drugs,” said Clark Carr, President of Narconon International in Los Angeles. “We have helped train drug educators on every continent except Antarctica, sharing what we have learned so that they can in turn educate young people to make saner choices, never to pick up a needle, a pill, or a joint. This special day gives us an opportunity to add our voices to so many others encouraging people to live drug-free lives.”

As they do every year, Narconon drug prevention specialists will reach hundreds of thousands of young people as part of their consistent, extensive drug prevention offering. In the past two years, more than three-quarters of a million people, most of them schoolchildren, have attended these classes.

While the emphasis of the Narconon organization originally focussed on drug rehabilitation, it quickly became obvious that without effective drug education, there might soon be an overwhelming number of addicted people to deal with. The founder of the Narconon program, William Benitez, set the pattern for Narconon drug education with lectures he gave in Arizona and other parts of the Southwest as early as the late 1960s.

Consistently, Narconon drug education staffs have surveyed youth after drug ed lectures to get their feedback, to learn from this and improve the effectiveness of these classes. In 1995, followup surveys from Los Angeles classes to youth showed a strong result with at-risk kids – those who identified themselves as being likely to use drugs in the future. Eight-six percent of those youth said they were less likely to use drugs after these classes. That survey can be found on the website of ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center.)

Then, in 2008, a formal evaluation of the Narconon high school drug education curriculum was published in a peer reviewed journal. In this study, 1,000 Oklahoma and Hawaii youth attended the complete Narconon drug education curriculum and were surveyed before, immediately after and six months after the curriculum. Significant reductions were reported in the use of gateway drugs, tobacco use falling most significantly, followed by lowered marijuana use. Decreases in alcohol and amphetamine use were also significant.

Over in Europe, in Italy alone, more than 83,000 people heard the Narconon anti-drug message in the last two years. Italian drug educators just recently tabulated the post-lecture student surveys, paralleling the Los Angeles 1995 tabulation. Following the presentations, more than 3,300 Italian youth were asked to rate their responses to, among other questions, these two comments:

    1. The lesson has allowed me to learn things I did not know, and

    2. The topic of the lesson was important with useful information about drugs and alcohol.

As the two pie charts show, on the first point, nearly half the Italian youth responded that they learned things about the dangers of drugs that they hadn’t previously known. A little less than half felt “moderate” increase in understanding. Only 3% of the students didn’t feel they learned much.

On the second point, more than three-quarters of the Italian students said that the lessons contained correct and important information about drugs. Only one percent of students felt the information was not particularly correct and important.

“Narconon drug educators have been working hard for the last two years,” said Carr. “In North American they reached over 250,00 young people. In northern Europe almost 200,000. In Latin America 45,000 and in Australia and Asia over 122,000. On this international day against drugs, we salute our Narconon staff as well as all those others worldwide who are fighting this battle. Whether they work in rehab, law enforcement or education and, of course, including those parents who talk to their kids at home, this is simply about saving the future generation.”

For more information on the Narconon drug education or rehab programs or to obtain drug prevention materials from Narconon visit http://www.narconon.org.







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Narconon Freedom Center Focuses on Prescription Warnings During National Safety Month


Albion, MI (PRWEB) May 30, 2014

The National Safety Council sponsors the month of June as National Safety Month. As part of the U.S Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the National Safety Council cites injuries as a leading cause of disability for Americans of all ages, as well as a leading cause of death for those aged 1 to 44. The agency also notes that many injuries can be prevented when safe practices are implemented.

Safety Issues

During National Safety Month, people are encouraged to become informed as to the important safety issues highlighted as those worthy of attention and raised awareness. Issues cited specifically included prescription drug abuse.

Prescription Drug Abuse

Some prescription drugs, commonly referred to as “medications,” have psychoactive or mind-altering properties. For this reason, these drugs lend themselves to use and abuse by individuals taking them for non-medical reasons or in ways or amounts not intended by a prescribing doctor.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse in their Research Report on How Many People Abuse Prescription Drugs that was published in October of 2011, prescription drugs as well as OTC (over-the-counter) drugs are the most commonly abused substances by Americans aged 14 and older, after marijuana and alcohol. [Source: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/prescription-drugs/trends-in-prescription-drug-abuse/how-many-people-abuse-prescription-drugs

The organization goes onto say that the most commonly abused prescription drugs are the class of opioid pain relievers such as OxyContin or Vicodin, the stimulant prescription drugs used for treating ADHD such as Ritalin, Concerta or Adderall, and the CNS (Central Nervous System) depressants used for anxiety relief, such as Xanax or Valium.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse in their Topics in Brief Prescription Drug Abuse piece, published December 2011, says that the most commonly abused OTC (over-the counter) drugs are the cold and cough medicines which contain dextromethorphan, a cough suppressant which has the potential for abuse as a recreational drug due to its euphoric and hallucinogenic properties when used in high doses. [Source: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/topics-in-brief/prescription-drug-abuse

Narconon Freedom Center’s Warning

As a long-term residential drug rehab facility in Michigan dedicated to helping addicts reclaim their lives from addiction, the executives and staff of Narconon Freedom Center have extensive experience in the consequences of prescription drug abuse, and the dangers of easily becoming addicted to these narcotic painkillers.

In an effort to raise awareness and help to prevent the suffering and heartache caused by prescription drug abuse and addition, Narconon Freedom Center cautions people that it is a misconception that prescription drugs are safer than illicit drugs, emphasizing that they are potentially highly addictive, put the user at risk of adverse health effects, and when used in combination with alcohol or other drugs can result in overdose and death.

Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention

Narconon Freedom Center also sends its message of prevention actions which people can take in an effort to remain safe from the consequences of prescription drug abuse and addiction.

The center executives and staff caution against taking a prescription medication (drug) which has been prescribed to someone else, pointing out that most teens abusing prescription drugs get them free from a relative or friend.

They also caution against taking a prescription medication (drug) in any manner other than prescribed. Most prescription drugs are dispensed to be taken orally in tablets, and not crushed for snorting or injecting, which speeds-up and amplifies its effects, with consequent risks.

The center’s parting caution is to never take a prescription drug for any other purpose than that for which it was prescribed. It is known that any of the prescription drug-types mentioned herein are capable of producing a high, the main reason for potential abuse.

But the main warning is the fact that the real cost of prescription drug abuse and its artificial and temporary high, is all too frequently a life.

For further information on or help with prescription drug abuse, please contact Narconon Freedom Center toll-free at 1-877-362-9682 or visit their website at http://www.narcononfreedomcenter.org/.