Tag Archives: Heroin

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Heroin Addiction, Suboxone and Methadone Dependency, Methamphetamine, Crystal Meth, Speed Addiction Being Cured with a New Healing Protocol at The Holistic Sanctuary


Los Angeles CA (PRWEB) March 20, 2014

Addiction to drugs is not new, mankind has always found substances to enslave themselves. Trying to break away from the grasp of these addictive drugs involves tolerating sometimes immense mental and physical agony. Oftentimes the addict cannot tolerate the associated withdrawal symptoms and just gives up. Even after a successful weaning off the drug, the addict succumbs to cravings and reverts back to their old addictions. The majority of “treatment” programs simply replace one addiction with another, but this time it is with a prescription drug.

http://www.theholisticsanctuary.com/ located in Baja, California, is breaking new ground in the battle against drug addiction. Their proprietary healing treatment, called the “Pouyan Method”, stands alone as having the ability to cure even the most severe addictions. It addresses the underlying cause of drug abuse, and focuses on the mind, body and soul. Those addicted to Heroin, Crack, Meth, and other drugs, report experiencing zero withdrawal symptoms as their brain resets itself in less than 10 days.

The “Pouyan Method”, which means: “The Seekers Method”, was developed by the founder of The Holistic Sanctuary,Johnny The Healer. Johnny has seen phenomenal results through the use of plant based medicines, such as Ibogaine and Ayahuasca, in combination with custom complementary medicine and other proven therapies, such as: Chelation, Hyperbaric Oxygen Chambers, Super Foods, Ionic Sea Salt Baths, Reiki/Chi gong/Pranic Healing, Amino Acid and Vitamin IV Drips, Sauna and Massage Therapy, Daily Motivational Therapy, and fresh organic meals cooked by a personal chef.

Johnny The Healer (See Special Video Here) uses plants, herbs and roots from Africa and Peru that have been used for incurable medical conditions for thousands of years. The success of these all-natural substances have caused those addicted to drugs to seek out these treatments wherever they can be found, for they not only cure the addiction, but cure the root of the problem that caused their drug abuse.

The success of the “Pouyan Method” has caused scientists from around the world to seek a better understanding of what The Holistic Sanctuary is all about. The “before-and-after” brain scans of patients treated with this all-natural method illustrates damaged cells being repaired, restoring the brain back to its pre-addicted state. The proof is in the scans.

During a recent press conference, Johnny The Healer had this to say: “We are aware of the risks involved when working with addicts as well as the dangers of taking people off pharmaceutical drugs. Our highest concern is the patient’s safety. With hundreds of patients and thousands of successful treatments, we have had no issues. This is because of our pretreatment protocol, our exams, blood work, EKG’s and our highly trained teams of medical doctors and nurses who are by the patient’s side the duration of their stay. We use only natural and organic, GMO free, nontoxic foods and holistic medicine. We never use toxic medications from pharmaceutical companies that cause serious side effects. Instead, the patients leave our facility feeling reborn, healthy and pure with a clear sense of well being, addiction free without the cravings associated with traditional so- called rehabs.”

He goes on to say: “The common sense here is let food be thy medicine, not toxic Suboxone Methadone and Xanax. All drug rehabs and so-called expert addiction doctors use only toxic drugs. If you see their arsenal they offer, its talk therapy and more drugs, toxic drugs that cause more harm. When you walk into a drug rehab center for heroin addiction, the first thing they do is give you addictive drugs. They get you off illegal drugs and quickly put you on legal drugs, but both drugs are toxic. If you walk into The Holistic Sanctuary, you will be taken off heroin in 3 hours, permanently, with no pain and no withdrawals. Then the following 7 -10 days is spent resting the brain.”

Johnny The Healer explains that it makes little sense to think that all that has to be done is give people these plants and herbs and expect a miracle. The addict’s brain requires the building-blocks to help repair and restore itself, such as amino acids, neurotransmitters and peptides which work in concert with the other available holistic modalities. The Holistic Sanctuary boasts over 35 hours of “one-on-one” healing treatments per week, the highest on the planet!

Anyone seeking to explore the “Pouyan Method” and The Holistic Sanctuary for themselves or for a loved one is encouraged to visit: http://www.theholisticsanctuary.com or call (323) 606-9904.

The Holistic Sanctuary

Attn: Media Relations

Baja, California

323.606.9904







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Maryland Heroin Deaths See Major Increase


USA (PRWEB) July 03, 2014

As reported by The Washington Post in the article Heroin Deaths Spike in Maryland (6/27), the Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has recently discovered that heroin-related deaths in the state have gone up by 88% within the last three years. Many local residents reported that they were expecting the result to be a large number but did not expect such a large spike. Maryland’s neighboring state, Virginia, reported that its heroin deaths have doubled within the same time frame. As a result of these findings, both states have began training civilians to use the overdose-reversal drug Naloxone. Maryland Mayor Martin O’Malley has began to set goals on lowering the number of drug-related deaths in the state by 20%. Additionally, the state is beginning to launch public health campaigns and is pushing for more prescription regulations.

Heroin is a powerful drug that can affect anybody. Many people become addicted to heroin by improperly taking prescription opiates or by obtaining the street form of the drug. Heroin is so addictive that a person who uses it can get hooked even after one try. After using heroin for a certain amount of time, your body can develop a tolerance, ultimately leading you to use more and more. Heroin has caused and continue to causes many deaths. If you or a loved one is currently struggling with a heroin or opiate addiction, the best course of action to take is to get help immediately. Harbor Village, an upscale drug addiction facility in Southern Florida, is experienced in treating clients with heroin and opiate addictions.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/heroin-deaths-spike-in-maryland/2014/06/27/5a0dd2ce-fe18-11e3-8176-f2c941cf35f1_story.html

Located in South Florida, Harbor Village, a heroin addiction detox center, has programs in place to help those suffering from a dependency to alcohol overcome their abuse. The 24/7 medically supervised detox facility allows each client to recover in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including a beautifully furnished suite complete with satellite television, over an acre of scenic outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, healthy gourmet dining and a caring, attentive staff that guides each client every step of the way.

“We have helped many clients overcome their dependencies on alcohol. Each case is different and we provide each client with the individualized care they deserve,” said Robert Niznik, Harbor Village CEO.

For more information about this luxury rehab center, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline 1-855-290-4261.







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Latest A Forever Recovery Blog Post Focuses on the Flood of Heroin Entering in the US


Battle Creek, MI (PRWEB) July 03, 2014

In its new blog post, A Forever Recovery, an open-ended drug and alcohol treatment program that gets clients off to a great start and gives them a solid foundation in recovery they can believe in, is focusing on the flood of heroin entering the US.

The new blog post highlights that, while prescription opiate drug abuse continues to run rampant across the country, many people are switching to heroin because of its relatively lower cost and increased availability. Some eye-opening statistics include:


3.8 million people admit to having tried heroin.
Over 600,000 people need heroin addiction treatment.
Over 14% of people entering rehab call heroin their “drug of choice”
Nearly 33% of high school seniors say that heroin is easy to obtain.
Over 80% of heroin users are younger than 26 years old.

“These numbers are shocking, and we need to do everything we can to stem the tide and stop the heroin flood that is ravaging our cities and communities,” commented A Forever Recovery’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “And while we need to make treatment available to those who need it, we can’t simply focus all of our resources on reacting to the epidemic. We need to invest in tools that educate individuals on the dangers of addiction to all substances – including but not limited to heroin – so they can make the right choices, and help others do the same. Together, we can turn back this flood!”

The full text of A Forever Recovery’s latest blog post entitled “Heroin Addiction: Flooding the United States in Waves” is available at http://aforeverrecovery.com/blog/addiction/heroin-flooding-united-states-waves/

About A Forever Recovery

A Forever Recovery program is an open-ended drug and alcohol treatment program that gets clients off to a great start and gives them a solid foundation in recovery they can believe in. Not every treatment methodology works for every client. Some people are very receptive to 12-step principles, whereas others are more comfortable with faith-based treatment. Cognitive approaches have excellent success, whereas others thrive within a more holistic approach. A Forever Recovery allows clients to choose from a wide range of recovery methodologies, coupled with Moral Recognition Therapy (MRT), to achieve success rates unmatched in the addiction treatment industry. The bottom line is that there is no single therapeutic approach to recovery that works for everyone… until now.

Learn more at http://aforeverrecovery.com/.







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New Found Life of Delray Beach Comments on Increased Heroin Use in the Wake of Philip Seymour Hoffmans Death


Delray Beach, Florida (PRWEB) February 28, 2014

On February 2, 2014, Oscar-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died at the age of 46 of an apparent heroin overdose (1). Since the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman, New Found Life of Delray Beach has received an upsurge of phone calls, and web traffic regarding heroin addiction.

The leading treatment and recovery center today released a statement commenting on the increased use of heroin throughout the United States:

“While speaking with other treatment professionals and industry leaders, in wake of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s tragic death, a steady increase of families seeking heroin related information and treatment for their loved ones has been noted. Unfortunately, it took the death of a beloved Oscar-winning actor to expose the very real heroin epidemic that has spread across the United States,” stated owner Michael Watt

“Once known as a drug only used by street people and so-called ‘lowlifes’, the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman is shining a light on this dangerous drug and how it has affected all levels of society,” Watt continued. “It’s like Alcoholism was back in the old days – First Lady Betty Ford raised awareness of alcohol addiction when she announced her long-running battle with alcoholism in the 1970s. Her revelation gave other alcoholics the courage to admit their own pain and suffering brought on by alcoholism. After Betty Ford, a socialite by all definitions expressed her own pains and struggles with alcoholism, people were coming out about their own battles with alcohol. Soon people with alcoholism were no longer ostracized.”

Philip Seymour Hoffman’s recent death has had a similar affect by validating heroin users as ordinary people with addiction struggles. Like all addiction, heroin doesn’t care what a person does for a living, their ethnic background or how much money they make.

In addition to Hoffman’s death, there has been heavy media coverage focused on the heroin epidemic this year due to the deaths of 22 people in Pennsylvania which were attributed to a deadly mix of heroin and Fentanyl (2), as well as attention from public figures such as the Governor of Vermont (3).

New Found Life of Delray Beach hopes that the media coverage surrounding heroin use will encourage addicts from all walks of life to come forward and seek professional treatment. Additionally New Found Life of Delray Beach hopes that this issue will help to make the general public aware that heroin addicts come from all walks of life and should be afforded the same respect and support as any other addition.

New Found Life of Delray Beach provides a comprehensive treatment and recovery center, offering both inpatient and outpatient treatment programs, group therapy, and individual therapy. To learn more, please visit http://www.nflfl.com.

Sources:

(1) “Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death points to broader opioid drug epidemic,” published February 7, 2014 in The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/philip-seymour-hoffman-heroin-death-points-to-broader-opioid-drug-epidemic/2014/02/07/42dbbc5a-8e61-11e3-b46a-5a3d0d2130da_story.html

(2) “Bad heroin blamed for 22 deaths in western Pennsylvania,” published Jan. 28, 2014 in the Los Angeles Times. http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-heroin-22-deaths-pittsburgh-20140128,0,1372747.story#axzz2rpE5CTiX

(3) “In Annual Speech, Vermont Governor Shifts Focus to Drug Abuse,” published Jan. 8, 2014 in the New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/09/us/in-annual-speech-vermont-governor-shifts-focus-to-drug-abuse.html?_r=0Top







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Latest Blog Post from Per Wickstrom Focuses On Killer Heroin Thats On the Rise


(PRWEB) March 06, 2014

The latest blog post from Per Wickstrom at PerWickstrom.com is focusing on a frightening drug that is making its way across the US and, particularly, the east coast in states like Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Rhode Island: “killer heroin.”

As the chilling label implies, killer heroin is a potentially lethal combination of heroin and fentanyl, which is a prescription painkiller significantly more potent than morphine. And while the loaded drug is not new – having first hit the scene around 2006 – in recent weeks it has once again been thrust into the public eye due to a spate of overdoses and deaths.

“Killer heroin looks different from plain heroin, and is yellowish instead of white,” commented Per Wickstrom. “It also goes by a few different names, such as `Bud Ice’, `Theraflu’ and `Income Tax’. The bottom line is that there’s no such thing as safe heroin, and killer heroin in particular can be extremely devastating. Anyone who is struggling with an addition, or knows someone who is, should seek professional medical help immediately – before it may be too late.”

The full text of Per Wickstrom’s latest blog entitled “Killer Heroin on the Rise is available at http://www.perwickstrom.com/news/killer-heroin-on-the-rise.

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Per Wickstrom

Per Wickstrom is the President and Founder of Best Drug Rehabilitation, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center focused on helping individuals through holistic and natural methods. Per believes that it’s never too late to turn your life around and do something positive with your life – he is living proof that hard work, perseverance, and a positive attitude can overcome any negative situation.

Learn more at http://www.PerWickstrom.com.







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Former Narconon Arrowhead Patient Speaks for First Time on His Recovery from Heroin Addiction


(PRWEB) April 14, 2014

The nationwide heroin epidemic has affected millions of life. Reports from the National Institute on Drug Abuse report that one out of 15 people that use prescriptions will try the drug within 10 years. What’s worse is that we are losing lives every day to a problem that can be remedied with successful rehabilitation.

Meet Joseph. Joseph had taken heroin intravenously for over twenty years. He recently completed the Narconon Arrowhead program; and decided to publicly for the first time to discuss his addiction and recovery because so many people are struggling with heroin issues.

During the time when he used heroin, he had been to prison, funerals for “friends” (other addicts), ICU, and many of the other places frequented by drug addicts. No matter how many rehabilitation facilities he went to or how many treatment programs he participated in, Joseph was unable to resolve his heroin addiction. That is, until he was admitted for treatment at Narconon Arrowhead.

At Narconon, Joseph was able to take a look at his life and confront what was occurring in it. He could see where he had been and who he had become, and figure out who he really wanted to be and where he wanted to go in life. He gained new tools for his life, new abilities to communicate with others around him, and new skills to handle the problems in life and achieve his goals. After nearly three decades of taking from society and the world around him, Joseph was able to give back to others at Narconon by helping them accomplish what he had accomplished on his program. Now that he has graduated from the program and conquered his heroin addiction, Joseph feels that Narconon is undoubtedly the best rehabilitation program in the world – simply because it worked when none other could.

About Narconon Arrowhead

In treating heroin addiction, many rehabilitation facilities and programs recommend a substitute medication program. This type of program aims to bring the individual down off their heroin addiction without having to experience some of the more intensely painful withdrawal symptoms, including restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes, goose bumps, severe cravings and more. However, many of these substitute medications, like methadone, carry their own risks of tolerance, dependence and addiction, and can therefore act only to replace the individual’s heroin addiction with another addiction, rather than helping them successfully achieve full sobriety from drugs.

The true goal of a rehabilitation facility would be to help an individual achieve full sobriety from all drugs, and gain the knowledge they need to confidently pursue a healthy, productive future. This is the goal of Narconon Arrowhead treatment. And, based on staff and client surveys, recent outcome studies and patient reviews the facility does this with 70% reporting drug abstinence from several months to many years after successful completion of the program.

For more information on Narconon Arrowhead call 800-468-6933 or log into http://www.narcononarrowhead.org.

Sources:

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/heroin

http://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/infographics/abuse-prescription-pain-medications-risks-heroin-use







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Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Looks at the History of Heroin


(PRWEB) March 12, 2014

Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers addiction recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, is focusing on the history of heroin in its latest blog post.

The history of heroin as we know it today dates back to 1895, when a German chemist attempted to change morphine chemically in order to reduce its side effects and addictive qualities. The resulting drug he produced on behalf of his employer Bayer was called “heroin,” and advertised as a painkiller 10 times as potent as morphine, yet with no addictive qualities whatsoever.

Word quickly spread around the world, and the Saint James Society in the US launched a campaign to supply free samples of this new wonder drug to morphine addicts. Even the Sears Roebuck company joined the cause, by offering heroin and needles in its well-known catalog.

Predictably, the optimism surrounding heroin soon turned into concern, and by 1902 physician groups lobbied to have it withdrawn. Congress followed suit by banning it in 1905; however, by that time, heroin addiction had risen to alarming levels.

While outlawing heroin temporarily put a dent in its use, it wasn’t long before criminal gangs filled the void and dramatically escalated heroin manufacturing, distribution and export. By 1925, an estimated 1.7% of the US population was addicted to heroin, and was first referred to as an epidemic around 1950. Heroin abuse was also one of the core issues that led to the creation of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in 1973.

Today, heroin, morphine and opium addiction has skyrocketed, largely as a result of growing prescription drug abuse (e.g. Percocet, Vicodin, OxyContin, Opana, and many others). According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), nearly 11% of Americans between 18 and 25 abused opiates or prescription painkillers in 2012.

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog entitled “What is the History of Heroin?” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/addiction/what-is-the-history-of-heroin/.

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe (at) rehabadmin (dot) com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/.







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CDC Study Shows Heroin User Demographics Changing Novus Medical Detox Says Shifting Tide Signals Drugs Widespread Infiltration


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) June 30, 2014

Heroin is an historically low-grade drug that by most accounts had retreated from American society, referred to by an AP article published earlier this year as “a blurry memory of a dangerous drug that dwelled in some dark recess of American culture.” (1) But recent studies have shown that heroin use is on the rise, and it is no longer relegated to lower-income or urban environments —according to the Centers for Disease Control, as much as 90% of heroin users are now white suburban residents. (2) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, says that heroin abuse is a constant threat pervading American society —one that can only be counteracted by the combined action of medical professionals, government action, and detox and rehabilitation programs in lieu of incarceration.

Despite most data gathered relating to heroin abuse forwarding the belief that the drug was primarily an inner-city issue, current user demographics have shown that heroin is now an alternative solution for white suburbanites due to its affordability compared to that of prescription pills. One street bag or heroin can cost as little as $ 10, much less than the $ 80 needed for one OxyContin pill. But accompanying heroin’s low cost is the risk that it is likely “cut with various chemicals and administered by unsanitary means, leading to the spread of HIV, hepatitis and other infectious diseases.” (2)

Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon attributes heroin’s resurgence within suburban environments to several factors, but mainly to the crackdown on prescription painkillers which has led to an abundant supply of heroin, which offers a faster, more potent high than prescription drugs. In addition, heroin has lost the lowbrow image it once had, per Runyon.

“Heroin is no longer seen as a ‘dirty drug’ only used by those deep into their addictions, but rather as an inexpensive alternative to prescription opiate drugs which are now harder than ever to obtain,” said Runyon. “But its widespread reach is a warning signal that action needs to be taken immediately —heroin abuse is a public health threat that can be eradicated with preemptive drug legislation and public education.”

Recent reports show that anti-heroin efforts have culminated in hundreds of arrests. In northern New Jersey, more than 300 people were arrested in an eight-week effort aimed at combating the surge of heroin abuse; many of the accused were from suburban communities in the area, and came from a variety of backgrounds, including “a soldier wounded fighting in Afghanistan, a dental hygienist, a public works employee and a Philadelphia Phillies baseball prospect.” (3)

However, Runyon maintains that rather than encouraging the current landscape of punishing drug-addicted individuals with incarceration, they should instead be treated as people who need help that can only be achieved through comprehensive detox and rehabilitation.

For users looking to overcome their addiction, the withdrawal process is often intimidating, as the symptoms can range from uncomfortable to excruciating —symptoms of withdrawal can include abdominal cramping, diarrhea, dilated pupils, goose bumps, nausea and vomiting. (4)

Because the heroin withdrawal process is so difficult, its abusers often avoid detox and rehab at all costs —many abusers continue their drug use even when they desire to live a sober life, per Runyon. Historically, the detox process has been a one-size-fits-all system where some were able to tough it out, but many were not —a fact which led Novus to open its doors with the purpose of fixing the detox process to ensure that anyone could overcome drug addiction comfortably. The detox center handles the toughest of drug and alcohol cases, including many which are rejected from other facilities as “too high a risk.”

Novus advises those who are dependent on any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those employing integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment —putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.    Barr, Meghan. “New Wave of Heroin Claims Hoffman and Others.” N.p., 4 Feb. 2014. Web. 19 June 2014. bigstory.ap.org/article/new-wave-heroin-claims-hoffman-and-others.

2.    Jones, David. “Heroin User Demographics Are Changing.” Guardian Liberty Voice, 31 May 2014. Web. 19 June 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/05/heroin-user-demographics-are-changing/.

3.    Cohen, Noah. “Hundreds Arrested in North Jersey Anti-heroin Effort, Bergen Prosecutor Says.” NJ.com. N.p., 3 June 2014. Web. 19 June 2014. nj.com/bergen/index.ssf/2014/06/more_than_325_arrested_in_north_jersey_anti-heroin_effort_bergen_prosecutor_says.html.

4.    “Opiate Withdrawal.” U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 19 June 2014. nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000949.htm.







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Latest Blog Post from Per Wickstrom Focuses On Killer Heroin Thats On the Rise


(PRWEB) March 06, 2014

The latest blog post from Per Wickstrom at PerWickstrom.com is focusing on a frightening drug that is making its way across the US and, particularly, the east coast in states like Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Rhode Island: “killer heroin.”

As the chilling label implies, killer heroin is a potentially lethal combination of heroin and fentanyl, which is a prescription painkiller significantly more potent than morphine. And while the loaded drug is not new – having first hit the scene around 2006 – in recent weeks it has once again been thrust into the public eye due to a spate of overdoses and deaths.

“Killer heroin looks different from plain heroin, and is yellowish instead of white,” commented Per Wickstrom. “It also goes by a few different names, such as `Bud Ice’, `Theraflu’ and `Income Tax’. The bottom line is that there’s no such thing as safe heroin, and killer heroin in particular can be extremely devastating. Anyone who is struggling with an addition, or knows someone who is, should seek professional medical help immediately – before it may be too late.”

The full text of Per Wickstrom’s latest blog entitled “Killer Heroin on the Rise is available at http://www.perwickstrom.com/news/killer-heroin-on-the-rise.

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Per Wickstrom

Per Wickstrom is the President and Founder of Best Drug Rehabilitation, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center focused on helping individuals through holistic and natural methods. Per believes that it’s never too late to turn your life around and do something positive with your life – he is living proof that hard work, perseverance, and a positive attitude can overcome any negative situation.

Learn more at http://www.PerWickstrom.com.







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Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Looks at the History of Heroin


(PRWEB) March 12, 2014

Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers addiction recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, is focusing on the history of heroin in its latest blog post.

The history of heroin as we know it today dates back to 1895, when a German chemist attempted to change morphine chemically in order to reduce its side effects and addictive qualities. The resulting drug he produced on behalf of his employer Bayer was called “heroin,” and advertised as a painkiller 10 times as potent as morphine, yet with no addictive qualities whatsoever.

Word quickly spread around the world, and the Saint James Society in the US launched a campaign to supply free samples of this new wonder drug to morphine addicts. Even the Sears Roebuck company joined the cause, by offering heroin and needles in its well-known catalog.

Predictably, the optimism surrounding heroin soon turned into concern, and by 1902 physician groups lobbied to have it withdrawn. Congress followed suit by banning it in 1905; however, by that time, heroin addiction had risen to alarming levels.

While outlawing heroin temporarily put a dent in its use, it wasn’t long before criminal gangs filled the void and dramatically escalated heroin manufacturing, distribution and export. By 1925, an estimated 1.7% of the US population was addicted to heroin, and was first referred to as an epidemic around 1950. Heroin abuse was also one of the core issues that led to the creation of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in 1973.

Today, heroin, morphine and opium addiction has skyrocketed, largely as a result of growing prescription drug abuse (e.g. Percocet, Vicodin, OxyContin, Opana, and many others). According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), nearly 11% of Americans between 18 and 25 abused opiates or prescription painkillers in 2012.

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog entitled “What is the History of Heroin?” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/addiction/what-is-the-history-of-heroin/.

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe (at) rehabadmin (dot) com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/.