Tag Archives: help

Video Games Help Surgeons with Dexterity and More; Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Dr. Praveen Kadimcherla explains why Surgeons Should Play as Hard as They Work


West Orange, NJ (PRWEB) October 23, 2014

October 2014 – The next time you’re scheduled for minimally invasive surgery – such as the types used for many back and neck procedures – you may want to ask your surgeon how often he plays video games. Finding a surgeon who plays as hard as he or she works, at least when it comes to video games, has been proven to help dexterity and several other crucial skills surgeons employ in the operating room, according to Praveen Kadimcherla, MD, an orthopedic spine surgeon at Atlantic Spine Center.

Much research over the past decade has examined how video games – which can be eerily similar to surgical simulators used to train young doctors – enhance surgical prowess by improving hand-eye coordination, reaction time, problem-solving and other abilities surgeons rely on to perform at the highest levels, explains Dr. Kadimcherla, who is fellowship-trained in orthopedic and neurosurgery spine.

“Many patients would never guess that their surgeon might not only like video games, but can use them to do their jobs even better,” says Dr. Kadimcherla. “But it’s a novel idea that has its basis in scientific fact.”    

Plentiful evidence supports gaming among surgeons

Researchers have proven time and again that “gaming” might be part of a good day’s work for both new and established surgeons. Some of the most convincing evidence includes:


A 2011 study published in the journal Surgical Endoscopy of 33 laparoscopic surgeons – who use a tiny camera and instruments controlled by “joysticks” outside the body – showed that those who played video games involving hand-eye coordination at least three hours per week made about 37% fewer mistakes in the operating room. These surgeons also completed surgical tasks 27% quicker than doctors who didn’t play video games.

A study presented at the 2008 American Psychological Association (APA) meeting suggested that surgeons who played video games requiring dexterity and spatial skills – and then performed a drill testing these skills – were much faster at their first attempt than surgeons who didn’t play the games first. The speed advantage lasted across all 10 drill performances, with a whopping 303 laparoscopic surgeons analyzed.

A study from University of Wisconsin at Madison, also presented at the 2008 APA meeting, indicated that strategy-focused games such as World of Warcraft helped doctors sharpen their scientific thinking skills by working through problems similar to what they face in the operating room. Set in a fantasy world where players advance faster when working together, the game codes reward reasoning, predicting and using evaluative processes integral to scientific reasoning.

Of course, primitive video games such as Pong probably aren’t as useful to surgeons as World of Warcraft, and not all video games confer the same effects. Those most beneficial to surgeons seem to depend on a game’s content, how often it’s played, what grabs players’ attention onscreen and how players control the motions.

“Whether used as a training tool for traditional “open” surgery, laparoscopic, or robot-assisted surgery – which is also minimally invasive – the relevance of video games far exceeds what we thought it might back in the time of Pacman or Space Invaders,” Dr. Kadimcherla says.

Tips for “screening” your surgeon

If you’re planning minimally invasive surgery to treat conditions of the neck or back, such as those performed by Dr. Kadimcherla and his colleagues at Atlantic Spine, you may want to ask your surgeon if video games happen to be part of his regular routine. Many other factors are indicative of accomplished surgeons – and of course should be taken into account – but a video game pastime might suggest a surgeon’s interest and willingness to stay on top of their professional game, he says.

“A lot of us at Atlantic Spine Center play video games for fun and are gratified to know they’re making us better prepared for our patients,” Dr. Kadimcherla says. “The complex dexterity required to be good at both gaming and minimally invasive surgery are strikingly similar. It’s definitely a win-win situation for everyone involved.”

Atlantic Spine Center is a nationally recognized leader for endoscopic spine surgery with three locations in New Jersey in West Orange, Edison, North Bergen and Union. http://www.atlanticspinecenter.com

Praveen Kadimcherla, MD, is a board-certified orthopedic spine surgeon at Atlantic Spine Center.







Xulon Book Tells a Radical Testimony to Help Set Others Free


Mayodan, NC (PRWEB) October 17, 2014

In Ashes of a Broken Life, ($ 16.99, paperback, 9781498413626; $ 6.99, e-book, 9781498413633) author Thomas Badger pours out his heart and thoughts in the format of a testimonial, self-help book. As a former drug addict and dealer, the subject has been through some of the darkest places and situations that any one person could have experienced. He has chosen to elaborate on his deepest struggles so that others can relate to his past, and witness what God is doing with his future. Thomas instills a hope in readers that they, too, can be saved.

“I hope that people are able to see that even with all the bad things that I have done in my life, God was still able to use me for His glory,” states the author. “God has the power to take a ‘nobody’ and turn them into a somebody. Not just somebody, but a disciple of Christ. I know that God called me to write this book to help reach others!”

Thomas Badger is a father of two wonderful boys. He is a recovering drug addict. Despite struggling with addictions for most of his life, Thomas was able to get into a spiritual rehab. The author was able to become sober by submitting and being obedient to God. He adds, “I have made my story relatable to addicts by using my own life experiences in order to help. Our trials and tribulations are meant for us to be able to help others.”

Xulon Press, a part of Salem Communications Corporation, is the world’s largest Christian publisher, with more than 12,000 titles published to date. Salem Communications is the country’s leading Christian communications company with interests in radio, Internet and magazine publishing. Retailers may order Ashes of a Broken Life through Ingram Book Company and/or Spring Arbor Book Distributors. The book is available online through xulonpress.com/bookstore, amazon.com, and barnesandnoble.com.

Media Contact: Thomas Badger, badgerthomas82(at)gmail(dot)com







Orange County Pregnant Teens Find Help with Fristers

Irvine, California (PRWEB) October 16, 2014

Recently, a very special kind of graduation took place at Mariners Church in Irvine, California. The class was small. Only six students, all females 19 or younger — all mothers who, at a very early point in their lives, became pregnant and without knowing how they would succeed, made the decision to keep their babies. They all shared similar fears about a future excised from family and friends with no means of support: no job, no car and no education. A future dependent upon California’s social services.

Enter FRISTERS (Friends and Sisters), an organization that offers a place of safety, community, help and hope to teenagers who have chosen to parent. Through a unique curriculum designed to suit their specific needs, young moms are given the opportunity to grow to become the best women and the best mothers they can be. FRISTERS also offers a special program for their children to help them prepare for kindergarten and life.

During the ceremony, videoed interviews were presented of each graduate explaining the paths that led them from dire circumstances to this moment in time. One story, belonging to graduate Ashley Myers, was a poignant reminder of how easily a young girl can be misdirected when a family’s love and support is missing from her life.

Ashley is the product of a broken home. Her biological father left her and her two older siblings when she was just an infant. Her mother remarried, adding a new ‘dad’ and over the years, five more children into the household. Statistics* show that one out of two marriages in the US ends in divorce, that 75% remarry and that 66% of those who remarry or live together break up when children are involved. These figures indicate that even under the best conditions, the blending of two families under one roof is not easy. In Ashley’s case, the verbal, physical and emotional abuse supplied by her step-father made home life intolerable. At 13, she left, choosing to sleep on her best friend’s couch rather than endure the changes at home. The next two years of her life were virtually unsupervised. By 14, she was heavily involved in alcohol and drugs, and at 15 she became pregnant.

This was the beginning of a very difficult and uncertain time for Ashley. The decision to keep her baby was viewed as unwise by many who would control her life. She received no outside assistance and very little support from her parents, who allowed her to move back home, but insisted she pay rent. Returning to school was not an option. Ashley found a full-time job and with encouragement from her maternal grandparents, she enrolled in night school to earn her high school degree. She also began to attend AA meetings. It was a lonely time, made lonelier by the general public’s reaction to her condition. Like so many teen moms, she was alternately looked down on or ignored.

Despite the hardships, Ashley remained steadfast to her maternal and educational commitments. At 16, she gave birth to her son, Landon, and with him arrived new hope and help in the form of her son’s paternal grandmother. A second son, Cole, followed when she was 18. At three, he was diagnosed with MCT-8, a rare genetic disorder that would impair his physical and mental growth throughout the rest of his life.

It was at this point that Ashley was introduced to FRISTERS by Cole’s grandmother, a volunteer with the organization. Upon attending her first meeting, Ashley felt immediate love and acceptance. In her words, she, “found a place I can call home and a family; a true family that love and accept me for who I am and who will never stop supporting, encouraging and inspiring me to keep on achieving.”

The 32-week LifeCoach program provided Ashley with educational and vocational resources, one-to-one coaching, role models and spiritual support for all the areas of her life. The program was not easy, but it armed her with new parenting skills and a growing self-confidence in her abilities as a woman and a mother. In addition, the FRISTERS staff helped Ashley find the medical assistance she needed for her son Cole’s disabilities.

Through her participation in FRISTERS, Ashley found the strength to repair family connections and seek relationships in her personal life that were no longer controlling or abusive. At 24, she gave birth to her third son, Emmett. She now has an apartment and a full-time job that allows her to work from home while overseeing the care of her children. After receiving her high school diploma, Ashley enrolled at Orange Coast College and is two classes away from matriculation to CSU Long Beach to continue her studies in criminal justice.

Ashley Myers’ success is mirrored by the other five graduates. After completing the LifeCoach program with FRISTERS, all of them had high school diplomas. Some had advance degrees and mid-to-high level jobs. Three were married and two were celebrating the fact that they had closed escrow on homes for their families. And like Ashley, many will remain with their FRISTERS family as volunteers, teachers, friends and sisters; reaching out to other teen moms in need of guidance and support; empowering them to become the best women and the best mothers they can possibly be.

In September, FRISTERS opened its sixth location in Orange County at The Crossing Church, 2115 Newport Boulevard in Costa Mesa. If you know of a teen mother in need, please urge her to contact president and founder Ali Woodard or any of her wonderful staff at 949-387-7889 or info@Fristers.org. For a complete list of FRISTERS locations and more information, visit http://www.Fristers.org.


     Stepfamily Foundation Inc.
     Jeannette Lofas, Ph.D., LCSW

     310 West 85th St., Suite 1B

     New York, NY 10024

     Phone: (212)877-3244

     StepFamily.org/stepfamily-statistics

ABOUT FRISTERS                                                                                                                                                    

Every year over 400,000 teens give birth in the United States. Many lose the support of family and friends. Most have no high school diploma, no job, no driver’s license or car, and statistics show that nearly 70% live at the poverty level.

For the children born into poverty with single young mothers, the future is grim: a higher risk of premature birth and low birth weight; higher rates of abuse and neglect; development and emotional disturbances, such as hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, anxiety and low self-esteem; and a higher rate of dropping out of school. For the little girls, it’s an endless, repeating cycle of the lives their mothers lived: high school dropout, pregnant teen and long term dependence on public assistance. For the boys who grow up without a father’s influence, it’s a dangerous future populated with gang warfare, criminal activity and incarceration.

FRISTERS is dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty and abuse among teen moms. Since its inception, the organization has helped hundreds of young women graduate high school, enroll in college and vocational training schools, get drivers’ licenses, find employment, get off of welfare and become loving, caring, responsible parents and role models to their children.

FRISTERS has six locations in Orange County that offer LifeCoach, a weekly program for teen moms, pregnant or parenting, within the ages of 13-24, and Kidsters Childcare and School Readiness Program for their children, ages 0-7. These programs and services are provided to the community free of charge, regardless of religion, race, or ethnicity and there is no religious requirement for the programs. For more information, please visit http://www.fristers.org.

# # #

All trademarks in this release are the property of their respective owners.







Orange County Pregnant Teens Find Help with Fristers

Irvine, California (PRWEB) October 16, 2014

Recently, a very special kind of graduation took place at Mariners Church in Irvine, California. The class was small. Only six students, all females 19 or younger — all mothers who, at a very early point in their lives, became pregnant and without knowing how they would succeed, made the decision to keep their babies. They all shared similar fears about a future excised from family and friends with no means of support: no job, no car and no education. A future dependent upon California’s social services.

Enter FRISTERS (Friends and Sisters), an organization that offers a place of safety, community, help and hope to teenagers who have chosen to parent. Through a unique curriculum designed to suit their specific needs, young moms are given the opportunity to grow to become the best women and the best mothers they can be. FRISTERS also offers a special program for their children to help them prepare for kindergarten and life.

During the ceremony, videoed interviews were presented of each graduate explaining the paths that led them from dire circumstances to this moment in time. One story, belonging to graduate Ashley Myers, was a poignant reminder of how easily a young girl can be misdirected when a family’s love and support is missing from her life.

Ashley is the product of a broken home. Her biological father left her and her two older siblings when she was just an infant. Her mother remarried, adding a new ‘dad’ and over the years, five more children into the household. Statistics* show that one out of two marriages in the US ends in divorce, that 75% remarry and that 66% of those who remarry or live together break up when children are involved. These figures indicate that even under the best conditions, the blending of two families under one roof is not easy. In Ashley’s case, the verbal, physical and emotional abuse supplied by her step-father made home life intolerable. At 13, she left, choosing to sleep on her best friend’s couch rather than endure the changes at home. The next two years of her life were virtually unsupervised. By 14, she was heavily involved in alcohol and drugs, and at 15 she became pregnant.

This was the beginning of a very difficult and uncertain time for Ashley. The decision to keep her baby was viewed as unwise by many who would control her life. She received no outside assistance and very little support from her parents, who allowed her to move back home, but insisted she pay rent. Returning to school was not an option. Ashley found a full-time job and with encouragement from her maternal grandparents, she enrolled in night school to earn her high school degree. She also began to attend AA meetings. It was a lonely time, made lonelier by the general public’s reaction to her condition. Like so many teen moms, she was alternately looked down on or ignored.

Despite the hardships, Ashley remained steadfast to her maternal and educational commitments. At 16, she gave birth to her son, Landon, and with him arrived new hope and help in the form of her son’s paternal grandmother. A second son, Cole, followed when she was 18. At three, he was diagnosed with MCT-8, a rare genetic disorder that would impair his physical and mental growth throughout the rest of his life.

It was at this point that Ashley was introduced to FRISTERS by Cole’s grandmother, a volunteer with the organization. Upon attending her first meeting, Ashley felt immediate love and acceptance. In her words, she, “found a place I can call home and a family; a true family that love and accept me for who I am and who will never stop supporting, encouraging and inspiring me to keep on achieving.”

The 32-week LifeCoach program provided Ashley with educational and vocational resources, one-to-one coaching, role models and spiritual support for all the areas of her life. The program was not easy, but it armed her with new parenting skills and a growing self-confidence in her abilities as a woman and a mother. In addition, the FRISTERS staff helped Ashley find the medical assistance she needed for her son Cole’s disabilities.

Through her participation in FRISTERS, Ashley found the strength to repair family connections and seek relationships in her personal life that were no longer controlling or abusive. At 24, she gave birth to her third son, Emmett. She now has an apartment and a full-time job that allows her to work from home while overseeing the care of her children. After receiving her high school diploma, Ashley enrolled at Orange Coast College and is two classes away from matriculation to CSU Long Beach to continue her studies in criminal justice.

Ashley Myers’ success is mirrored by the other five graduates. After completing the LifeCoach program with FRISTERS, all of them had high school diplomas. Some had advance degrees and mid-to-high level jobs. Three were married and two were celebrating the fact that they had closed escrow on homes for their families. And like Ashley, many will remain with their FRISTERS family as volunteers, teachers, friends and sisters; reaching out to other teen moms in need of guidance and support; empowering them to become the best women and the best mothers they can possibly be.

In September, FRISTERS opened its sixth location in Orange County at The Crossing Church, 2115 Newport Boulevard in Costa Mesa. If you know of a teen mother in need, please urge her to contact president and founder Ali Woodard or any of her wonderful staff at 949-387-7889 or info@Fristers.org. For a complete list of FRISTERS locations and more information, visit http://www.Fristers.org.


     Stepfamily Foundation Inc.
     Jeannette Lofas, Ph.D., LCSW

     310 West 85th St., Suite 1B

     New York, NY 10024

     Phone: (212)877-3244

     StepFamily.org/stepfamily-statistics

ABOUT FRISTERS                                                                                                                                                    

Every year over 400,000 teens give birth in the United States. Many lose the support of family and friends. Most have no high school diploma, no job, no driver’s license or car, and statistics show that nearly 70% live at the poverty level.

For the children born into poverty with single young mothers, the future is grim: a higher risk of premature birth and low birth weight; higher rates of abuse and neglect; development and emotional disturbances, such as hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, anxiety and low self-esteem; and a higher rate of dropping out of school. For the little girls, it’s an endless, repeating cycle of the lives their mothers lived: high school dropout, pregnant teen and long term dependence on public assistance. For the boys who grow up without a father’s influence, it’s a dangerous future populated with gang warfare, criminal activity and incarceration.

FRISTERS is dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty and abuse among teen moms. Since its inception, the organization has helped hundreds of young women graduate high school, enroll in college and vocational training schools, get drivers’ licenses, find employment, get off of welfare and become loving, caring, responsible parents and role models to their children.

FRISTERS has six locations in Orange County that offer LifeCoach, a weekly program for teen moms, pregnant or parenting, within the ages of 13-24, and Kidsters Childcare and School Readiness Program for their children, ages 0-7. These programs and services are provided to the community free of charge, regardless of religion, race, or ethnicity and there is no religious requirement for the programs. For more information, please visit http://www.fristers.org.

# # #

All trademarks in this release are the property of their respective owners.







Orange County Pregnant Teens Find Help with Fristers

Irvine, California (PRWEB) October 16, 2014

Recently, a very special kind of graduation took place at Mariners Church in Irvine, California. The class was small. Only six students, all females 19 or younger — all mothers who, at a very early point in their lives, became pregnant and without knowing how they would succeed, made the decision to keep their babies. They all shared similar fears about a future excised from family and friends with no means of support: no job, no car and no education. A future dependent upon California’s social services.

Enter FRISTERS (Friends and Sisters), an organization that offers a place of safety, community, help and hope to teenagers who have chosen to parent. Through a unique curriculum designed to suit their specific needs, young moms are given the opportunity to grow to become the best women and the best mothers they can be. FRISTERS also offers a special program for their children to help them prepare for kindergarten and life.

During the ceremony, videoed interviews were presented of each graduate explaining the paths that led them from dire circumstances to this moment in time. One story, belonging to graduate Ashley Myers, was a poignant reminder of how easily a young girl can be misdirected when a family’s love and support is missing from her life.

Ashley is the product of a broken home. Her biological father left her and her two older siblings when she was just an infant. Her mother remarried, adding a new ‘dad’ and over the years, five more children into the household. Statistics* show that one out of two marriages in the US ends in divorce, that 75% remarry and that 66% of those who remarry or live together break up when children are involved. These figures indicate that even under the best conditions, the blending of two families under one roof is not easy. In Ashley’s case, the verbal, physical and emotional abuse supplied by her step-father made home life intolerable. At 13, she left, choosing to sleep on her best friend’s couch rather than endure the changes at home. The next two years of her life were virtually unsupervised. By 14, she was heavily involved in alcohol and drugs, and at 15 she became pregnant.

This was the beginning of a very difficult and uncertain time for Ashley. The decision to keep her baby was viewed as unwise by many who would control her life. She received no outside assistance and very little support from her parents, who allowed her to move back home, but insisted she pay rent. Returning to school was not an option. Ashley found a full-time job and with encouragement from her maternal grandparents, she enrolled in night school to earn her high school degree. She also began to attend AA meetings. It was a lonely time, made lonelier by the general public’s reaction to her condition. Like so many teen moms, she was alternately looked down on or ignored.

Despite the hardships, Ashley remained steadfast to her maternal and educational commitments. At 16, she gave birth to her son, Landon, and with him arrived new hope and help in the form of her son’s paternal grandmother. A second son, Cole, followed when she was 18. At three, he was diagnosed with MCT-8, a rare genetic disorder that would impair his physical and mental growth throughout the rest of his life.

It was at this point that Ashley was introduced to FRISTERS by Cole’s grandmother, a volunteer with the organization. Upon attending her first meeting, Ashley felt immediate love and acceptance. In her words, she, “found a place I can call home and a family; a true family that love and accept me for who I am and who will never stop supporting, encouraging and inspiring me to keep on achieving.”

The 32-week LifeCoach program provided Ashley with educational and vocational resources, one-to-one coaching, role models and spiritual support for all the areas of her life. The program was not easy, but it armed her with new parenting skills and a growing self-confidence in her abilities as a woman and a mother. In addition, the FRISTERS staff helped Ashley find the medical assistance she needed for her son Cole’s disabilities.

Through her participation in FRISTERS, Ashley found the strength to repair family connections and seek relationships in her personal life that were no longer controlling or abusive. At 24, she gave birth to her third son, Emmett. She now has an apartment and a full-time job that allows her to work from home while overseeing the care of her children. After receiving her high school diploma, Ashley enrolled at Orange Coast College and is two classes away from matriculation to CSU Long Beach to continue her studies in criminal justice.

Ashley Myers’ success is mirrored by the other five graduates. After completing the LifeCoach program with FRISTERS, all of them had high school diplomas. Some had advance degrees and mid-to-high level jobs. Three were married and two were celebrating the fact that they had closed escrow on homes for their families. And like Ashley, many will remain with their FRISTERS family as volunteers, teachers, friends and sisters; reaching out to other teen moms in need of guidance and support; empowering them to become the best women and the best mothers they can possibly be.

In September, FRISTERS opened its sixth location in Orange County at The Crossing Church, 2115 Newport Boulevard in Costa Mesa. If you know of a teen mother in need, please urge her to contact president and founder Ali Woodard or any of her wonderful staff at 949-387-7889 or info@Fristers.org. For a complete list of FRISTERS locations and more information, visit http://www.Fristers.org.


     Stepfamily Foundation Inc.
     Jeannette Lofas, Ph.D., LCSW

     310 West 85th St., Suite 1B

     New York, NY 10024

     Phone: (212)877-3244

     StepFamily.org/stepfamily-statistics

ABOUT FRISTERS                                                                                                                                                    

Every year over 400,000 teens give birth in the United States. Many lose the support of family and friends. Most have no high school diploma, no job, no driver’s license or car, and statistics show that nearly 70% live at the poverty level.

For the children born into poverty with single young mothers, the future is grim: a higher risk of premature birth and low birth weight; higher rates of abuse and neglect; development and emotional disturbances, such as hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, anxiety and low self-esteem; and a higher rate of dropping out of school. For the little girls, it’s an endless, repeating cycle of the lives their mothers lived: high school dropout, pregnant teen and long term dependence on public assistance. For the boys who grow up without a father’s influence, it’s a dangerous future populated with gang warfare, criminal activity and incarceration.

FRISTERS is dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty and abuse among teen moms. Since its inception, the organization has helped hundreds of young women graduate high school, enroll in college and vocational training schools, get drivers’ licenses, find employment, get off of welfare and become loving, caring, responsible parents and role models to their children.

FRISTERS has six locations in Orange County that offer LifeCoach, a weekly program for teen moms, pregnant or parenting, within the ages of 13-24, and Kidsters Childcare and School Readiness Program for their children, ages 0-7. These programs and services are provided to the community free of charge, regardless of religion, race, or ethnicity and there is no religious requirement for the programs. For more information, please visit http://www.fristers.org.

# # #

All trademarks in this release are the property of their respective owners.







Orange County Pregnant Teens Find Help with Fristers

Irvine, California (PRWEB) October 16, 2014

Recently, a very special kind of graduation took place at Mariners Church in Irvine, California. The class was small. Only six students, all females 19 or younger — all mothers who, at a very early point in their lives, became pregnant and without knowing how they would succeed, made the decision to keep their babies. They all shared similar fears about a future excised from family and friends with no means of support: no job, no car and no education. A future dependent upon California’s social services.

Enter FRISTERS (Friends and Sisters), an organization that offers a place of safety, community, help and hope to teenagers who have chosen to parent. Through a unique curriculum designed to suit their specific needs, young moms are given the opportunity to grow to become the best women and the best mothers they can be. FRISTERS also offers a special program for their children to help them prepare for kindergarten and life.

During the ceremony, videoed interviews were presented of each graduate explaining the paths that led them from dire circumstances to this moment in time. One story, belonging to graduate Ashley Myers, was a poignant reminder of how easily a young girl can be misdirected when a family’s love and support is missing from her life.

Ashley is the product of a broken home. Her biological father left her and her two older siblings when she was just an infant. Her mother remarried, adding a new ‘dad’ and over the years, five more children into the household. Statistics* show that one out of two marriages in the US ends in divorce, that 75% remarry and that 66% of those who remarry or live together break up when children are involved. These figures indicate that even under the best conditions, the blending of two families under one roof is not easy. In Ashley’s case, the verbal, physical and emotional abuse supplied by her step-father made home life intolerable. At 13, she left, choosing to sleep on her best friend’s couch rather than endure the changes at home. The next two years of her life were virtually unsupervised. By 14, she was heavily involved in alcohol and drugs, and at 15 she became pregnant.

This was the beginning of a very difficult and uncertain time for Ashley. The decision to keep her baby was viewed as unwise by many who would control her life. She received no outside assistance and very little support from her parents, who allowed her to move back home, but insisted she pay rent. Returning to school was not an option. Ashley found a full-time job and with encouragement from her maternal grandparents, she enrolled in night school to earn her high school degree. She also began to attend AA meetings. It was a lonely time, made lonelier by the general public’s reaction to her condition. Like so many teen moms, she was alternately looked down on or ignored.

Despite the hardships, Ashley remained steadfast to her maternal and educational commitments. At 16, she gave birth to her son, Landon, and with him arrived new hope and help in the form of her son’s paternal grandmother. A second son, Cole, followed when she was 18. At three, he was diagnosed with MCT-8, a rare genetic disorder that would impair his physical and mental growth throughout the rest of his life.

It was at this point that Ashley was introduced to FRISTERS by Cole’s grandmother, a volunteer with the organization. Upon attending her first meeting, Ashley felt immediate love and acceptance. In her words, she, “found a place I can call home and a family; a true family that love and accept me for who I am and who will never stop supporting, encouraging and inspiring me to keep on achieving.”

The 32-week LifeCoach program provided Ashley with educational and vocational resources, one-to-one coaching, role models and spiritual support for all the areas of her life. The program was not easy, but it armed her with new parenting skills and a growing self-confidence in her abilities as a woman and a mother. In addition, the FRISTERS staff helped Ashley find the medical assistance she needed for her son Cole’s disabilities.

Through her participation in FRISTERS, Ashley found the strength to repair family connections and seek relationships in her personal life that were no longer controlling or abusive. At 24, she gave birth to her third son, Emmett. She now has an apartment and a full-time job that allows her to work from home while overseeing the care of her children. After receiving her high school diploma, Ashley enrolled at Orange Coast College and is two classes away from matriculation to CSU Long Beach to continue her studies in criminal justice.

Ashley Myers’ success is mirrored by the other five graduates. After completing the LifeCoach program with FRISTERS, all of them had high school diplomas. Some had advance degrees and mid-to-high level jobs. Three were married and two were celebrating the fact that they had closed escrow on homes for their families. And like Ashley, many will remain with their FRISTERS family as volunteers, teachers, friends and sisters; reaching out to other teen moms in need of guidance and support; empowering them to become the best women and the best mothers they can possibly be.

In September, FRISTERS opened its sixth location in Orange County at The Crossing Church, 2115 Newport Boulevard in Costa Mesa. If you know of a teen mother in need, please urge her to contact president and founder Ali Woodard or any of her wonderful staff at 949-387-7889 or info@Fristers.org. For a complete list of FRISTERS locations and more information, visit http://www.Fristers.org.


     Stepfamily Foundation Inc.
     Jeannette Lofas, Ph.D., LCSW

     310 West 85th St., Suite 1B

     New York, NY 10024

     Phone: (212)877-3244

     StepFamily.org/stepfamily-statistics

ABOUT FRISTERS                                                                                                                                                    

Every year over 400,000 teens give birth in the United States. Many lose the support of family and friends. Most have no high school diploma, no job, no driver’s license or car, and statistics show that nearly 70% live at the poverty level.

For the children born into poverty with single young mothers, the future is grim: a higher risk of premature birth and low birth weight; higher rates of abuse and neglect; development and emotional disturbances, such as hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, anxiety and low self-esteem; and a higher rate of dropping out of school. For the little girls, it’s an endless, repeating cycle of the lives their mothers lived: high school dropout, pregnant teen and long term dependence on public assistance. For the boys who grow up without a father’s influence, it’s a dangerous future populated with gang warfare, criminal activity and incarceration.

FRISTERS is dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty and abuse among teen moms. Since its inception, the organization has helped hundreds of young women graduate high school, enroll in college and vocational training schools, get drivers’ licenses, find employment, get off of welfare and become loving, caring, responsible parents and role models to their children.

FRISTERS has six locations in Orange County that offer LifeCoach, a weekly program for teen moms, pregnant or parenting, within the ages of 13-24, and Kidsters Childcare and School Readiness Program for their children, ages 0-7. These programs and services are provided to the community free of charge, regardless of religion, race, or ethnicity and there is no religious requirement for the programs. For more information, please visit http://www.fristers.org.

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All trademarks in this release are the property of their respective owners.







Orange County Pregnant Teens Find Help with Fristers

Irvine, California (PRWEB) October 16, 2014

Recently, a very special kind of graduation took place at Mariners Church in Irvine, California. The class was small. Only six students, all females 19 or younger — all mothers who, at a very early point in their lives, became pregnant and without knowing how they would succeed, made the decision to keep their babies. They all shared similar fears about a future excised from family and friends with no means of support: no job, no car and no education. A future dependent upon California’s social services.

Enter FRISTERS (Friends and Sisters), an organization that offers a place of safety, community, help and hope to teenagers who have chosen to parent. Through a unique curriculum designed to suit their specific needs, young moms are given the opportunity to grow to become the best women and the best mothers they can be. FRISTERS also offers a special program for their children to help them prepare for kindergarten and life.

During the ceremony, videoed interviews were presented of each graduate explaining the paths that led them from dire circumstances to this moment in time. One story, belonging to graduate Ashley Myers, was a poignant reminder of how easily a young girl can be misdirected when a family’s love and support is missing from her life.

Ashley is the product of a broken home. Her biological father left her and her two older siblings when she was just an infant. Her mother remarried, adding a new ‘dad’ and over the years, five more children into the household. Statistics* show that one out of two marriages in the US ends in divorce, that 75% remarry and that 66% of those who remarry or live together break up when children are involved. These figures indicate that even under the best conditions, the blending of two families under one roof is not easy. In Ashley’s case, the verbal, physical and emotional abuse supplied by her step-father made home life intolerable. At 13, she left, choosing to sleep on her best friend’s couch rather than endure the changes at home. The next two years of her life were virtually unsupervised. By 14, she was heavily involved in alcohol and drugs, and at 15 she became pregnant.

This was the beginning of a very difficult and uncertain time for Ashley. The decision to keep her baby was viewed as unwise by many who would control her life. She received no outside assistance and very little support from her parents, who allowed her to move back home, but insisted she pay rent. Returning to school was not an option. Ashley found a full-time job and with encouragement from her maternal grandparents, she enrolled in night school to earn her high school degree. She also began to attend AA meetings. It was a lonely time, made lonelier by the general public’s reaction to her condition. Like so many teen moms, she was alternately looked down on or ignored.

Despite the hardships, Ashley remained steadfast to her maternal and educational commitments. At 16, she gave birth to her son, Landon, and with him arrived new hope and help in the form of her son’s paternal grandmother. A second son, Cole, followed when she was 18. At three, he was diagnosed with MCT-8, a rare genetic disorder that would impair his physical and mental growth throughout the rest of his life.

It was at this point that Ashley was introduced to FRISTERS by Cole’s grandmother, a volunteer with the organization. Upon attending her first meeting, Ashley felt immediate love and acceptance. In her words, she, “found a place I can call home and a family; a true family that love and accept me for who I am and who will never stop supporting, encouraging and inspiring me to keep on achieving.”

The 32-week LifeCoach program provided Ashley with educational and vocational resources, one-to-one coaching, role models and spiritual support for all the areas of her life. The program was not easy, but it armed her with new parenting skills and a growing self-confidence in her abilities as a woman and a mother. In addition, the FRISTERS staff helped Ashley find the medical assistance she needed for her son Cole’s disabilities.

Through her participation in FRISTERS, Ashley found the strength to repair family connections and seek relationships in her personal life that were no longer controlling or abusive. At 24, she gave birth to her third son, Emmett. She now has an apartment and a full-time job that allows her to work from home while overseeing the care of her children. After receiving her high school diploma, Ashley enrolled at Orange Coast College and is two classes away from matriculation to CSU Long Beach to continue her studies in criminal justice.

Ashley Myers’ success is mirrored by the other five graduates. After completing the LifeCoach program with FRISTERS, all of them had high school diplomas. Some had advance degrees and mid-to-high level jobs. Three were married and two were celebrating the fact that they had closed escrow on homes for their families. And like Ashley, many will remain with their FRISTERS family as volunteers, teachers, friends and sisters; reaching out to other teen moms in need of guidance and support; empowering them to become the best women and the best mothers they can possibly be.

In September, FRISTERS opened its sixth location in Orange County at The Crossing Church, 2115 Newport Boulevard in Costa Mesa. If you know of a teen mother in need, please urge her to contact president and founder Ali Woodard or any of her wonderful staff at 949-387-7889 or info@Fristers.org. For a complete list of FRISTERS locations and more information, visit http://www.Fristers.org.


     Stepfamily Foundation Inc.
     Jeannette Lofas, Ph.D., LCSW

     310 West 85th St., Suite 1B

     New York, NY 10024

     Phone: (212)877-3244

     StepFamily.org/stepfamily-statistics

ABOUT FRISTERS                                                                                                                                                    

Every year over 400,000 teens give birth in the United States. Many lose the support of family and friends. Most have no high school diploma, no job, no driver’s license or car, and statistics show that nearly 70% live at the poverty level.

For the children born into poverty with single young mothers, the future is grim: a higher risk of premature birth and low birth weight; higher rates of abuse and neglect; development and emotional disturbances, such as hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, anxiety and low self-esteem; and a higher rate of dropping out of school. For the little girls, it’s an endless, repeating cycle of the lives their mothers lived: high school dropout, pregnant teen and long term dependence on public assistance. For the boys who grow up without a father’s influence, it’s a dangerous future populated with gang warfare, criminal activity and incarceration.

FRISTERS is dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty and abuse among teen moms. Since its inception, the organization has helped hundreds of young women graduate high school, enroll in college and vocational training schools, get drivers’ licenses, find employment, get off of welfare and become loving, caring, responsible parents and role models to their children.

FRISTERS has six locations in Orange County that offer LifeCoach, a weekly program for teen moms, pregnant or parenting, within the ages of 13-24, and Kidsters Childcare and School Readiness Program for their children, ages 0-7. These programs and services are provided to the community free of charge, regardless of religion, race, or ethnicity and there is no religious requirement for the programs. For more information, please visit http://www.fristers.org.

# # #

All trademarks in this release are the property of their respective owners.







Recovering From Stroke Can Be Improved With Dr Allen’s Device, While Recent Article Said That Stroke Survivors Not Getting Enough Help, Highlights Fine Treatment


London, GB (PRWEB) October 13, 2014

Dr. Allen’s Device provides a unique opportunity to enhance the blood flow in the brain naturally. A recent research from the Heart and Stroke Foundation said just 16% of patients who have had a stroke are discharged to inpatient rehabilitation. Furthermore, some patients who enter rehabilitation programs don’t need it, while some who do need it and get it don’t receive the right amount of services, Fine Treatment reveals.

The article ‘Canadian stroke patients not getting help they need to fully recover: Study,’ dated October 3, 2014, in the Sun News, states that recovery from a stroke can take years, and the study noted the majority of people who had a stroke said they needed some kind of help to recover, while 80% said they experienced restrictions to their daily activities.

According to the article ‘Important findings released at the Canadian Stroke Congress,’ dated October 3, 2014, too many stroke patients need to return to a healthy, active life. “The study suggests there are a large number of Canadian stroke patients who are not getting the help they need at hospital discharge to get back to an active life,” says Dr. Michael Hill, director of the stroke unit at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and one of the study authors.

‘Dr. Allen’s Device provides a unique natural treatment that every patient can easily use at home,’ notes Dr. Allen. ‘Improved with this device blood circulation brings the energy to the brain and treats the loss of brain functions impaired by stroke.’

Dr. Cooper in the article ‘The emotional impact of a stroke,’ published in October 06, 2014, in the British Psychological Society said that at six weeks post-stroke, patients showed impairments in emotion regulation that were related to reduced social participation compared to a control group. At 18-months post-stroke there was still an association between the ability to regulate emotion and social participation, which was apparent even when other factors such as low mood and mobility problems had been accounted for.

Thermobalancing therapy is able to improve elderly brains’ performance and emotion,” says Dr. Simon Allen. “Dr. Allen’s Device for Head and Brain relieves the symptoms after stroke gradually, improving mood and mobility.”

For details, please visit Fine Treatment at http://finetreatment.com/brain-and-head-treatment/.

About Dr. Simon Allen and Fine Treatment:

Dr. Simon Allen, MD, PhD, Academician, member of the ATA, is a highly experienced medical professional. His specialty is in internal medicine. He has treated a wide range of chronic diseases, including patients after a heart attack, stroke, with kidneys problems, including kidney stones disease, prostate and spine conditions, as well as metabolic disorders.

Fine Treatment ensures international availability of Dr. Allen’s Devices for the treatment of chronic prostatitis and BPH, coronary heart disease, for dissolving kidney stones, for a powerful relief of upper and lower back pain and sciatica, as well as for natural brain function support.







Recovering From Stroke Can Be Improved With Dr Allen’s Device, While Recent Article Said That Stroke Survivors Not Getting Enough Help, Highlights Fine Treatment


London, GB (PRWEB) October 13, 2014

Dr. Allen’s Device provides a unique opportunity to enhance the blood flow in the brain naturally. A recent research from the Heart and Stroke Foundation said just 16% of patients who have had a stroke are discharged to inpatient rehabilitation. Furthermore, some patients who enter rehabilitation programs don’t need it, while some who do need it and get it don’t receive the right amount of services, Fine Treatment reveals.

The article ‘Canadian stroke patients not getting help they need to fully recover: Study,’ dated October 3, 2014, in the Sun News, states that recovery from a stroke can take years, and the study noted the majority of people who had a stroke said they needed some kind of help to recover, while 80% said they experienced restrictions to their daily activities.

According to the article ‘Important findings released at the Canadian Stroke Congress,’ dated October 3, 2014, too many stroke patients need to return to a healthy, active life. “The study suggests there are a large number of Canadian stroke patients who are not getting the help they need at hospital discharge to get back to an active life,” says Dr. Michael Hill, director of the stroke unit at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and one of the study authors.

‘Dr. Allen’s Device provides a unique natural treatment that every patient can easily use at home,’ notes Dr. Allen. ‘Improved with this device blood circulation brings the energy to the brain and treats the loss of brain functions impaired by stroke.’

Dr. Cooper in the article ‘The emotional impact of a stroke,’ published in October 06, 2014, in the British Psychological Society said that at six weeks post-stroke, patients showed impairments in emotion regulation that were related to reduced social participation compared to a control group. At 18-months post-stroke there was still an association between the ability to regulate emotion and social participation, which was apparent even when other factors such as low mood and mobility problems had been accounted for.

Thermobalancing therapy is able to improve elderly brains’ performance and emotion,” says Dr. Simon Allen. “Dr. Allen’s Device for Head and Brain relieves the symptoms after stroke gradually, improving mood and mobility.”

For details, please visit Fine Treatment at http://finetreatment.com/brain-and-head-treatment/.

About Dr. Simon Allen and Fine Treatment:

Dr. Simon Allen, MD, PhD, Academician, member of the ATA, is a highly experienced medical professional. His specialty is in internal medicine. He has treated a wide range of chronic diseases, including patients after a heart attack, stroke, with kidneys problems, including kidney stones disease, prostate and spine conditions, as well as metabolic disorders.

Fine Treatment ensures international availability of Dr. Allen’s Devices for the treatment of chronic prostatitis and BPH, coronary heart disease, for dissolving kidney stones, for a powerful relief of upper and lower back pain and sciatica, as well as for natural brain function support.







Recovering From Stroke Can Be Improved With Dr Allen’s Device, While Recent Article Said That Stroke Survivors Not Getting Enough Help, Highlights Fine Treatment


London, GB (PRWEB) October 13, 2014

Dr. Allen’s Device provides a unique opportunity to enhance the blood flow in the brain naturally. A recent research from the Heart and Stroke Foundation said just 16% of patients who have had a stroke are discharged to inpatient rehabilitation. Furthermore, some patients who enter rehabilitation programs don’t need it, while some who do need it and get it don’t receive the right amount of services, Fine Treatment reveals.

The article ‘Canadian stroke patients not getting help they need to fully recover: Study,’ dated October 3, 2014, in the Sun News, states that recovery from a stroke can take years, and the study noted the majority of people who had a stroke said they needed some kind of help to recover, while 80% said they experienced restrictions to their daily activities.

According to the article ‘Important findings released at the Canadian Stroke Congress,’ dated October 3, 2014, too many stroke patients need to return to a healthy, active life. “The study suggests there are a large number of Canadian stroke patients who are not getting the help they need at hospital discharge to get back to an active life,” says Dr. Michael Hill, director of the stroke unit at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and one of the study authors.

‘Dr. Allen’s Device provides a unique natural treatment that every patient can easily use at home,’ notes Dr. Allen. ‘Improved with this device blood circulation brings the energy to the brain and treats the loss of brain functions impaired by stroke.’

Dr. Cooper in the article ‘The emotional impact of a stroke,’ published in October 06, 2014, in the British Psychological Society said that at six weeks post-stroke, patients showed impairments in emotion regulation that were related to reduced social participation compared to a control group. At 18-months post-stroke there was still an association between the ability to regulate emotion and social participation, which was apparent even when other factors such as low mood and mobility problems had been accounted for.

Thermobalancing therapy is able to improve elderly brains’ performance and emotion,” says Dr. Simon Allen. “Dr. Allen’s Device for Head and Brain relieves the symptoms after stroke gradually, improving mood and mobility.”

For details, please visit Fine Treatment at http://finetreatment.com/brain-and-head-treatment/.

About Dr. Simon Allen and Fine Treatment:

Dr. Simon Allen, MD, PhD, Academician, member of the ATA, is a highly experienced medical professional. His specialty is in internal medicine. He has treated a wide range of chronic diseases, including patients after a heart attack, stroke, with kidneys problems, including kidney stones disease, prostate and spine conditions, as well as metabolic disorders.

Fine Treatment ensures international availability of Dr. Allen’s Devices for the treatment of chronic prostatitis and BPH, coronary heart disease, for dissolving kidney stones, for a powerful relief of upper and lower back pain and sciatica, as well as for natural brain function support.