Tag Archives: Health

Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







Alcohol and Your Health

Alcohol has a wide range of negative effects on an individual’s health. If used to excess over a significant period of time, it can cause serious damage and health complications.

The body can become physically dependent on alcohol and those addicted to alcohol may need to undergo alcohol detox so that they can stop drinking safely and in the long-term.

One of the misconceptions about alcohol is that it’s a stimulant; it is in fact a depressant. This is why it can cause people to slur their words, make poor judgements, lose their memory and perhaps become violent.

Alcohol cal also cause stomach problems and is a major irritant. Drinking a lot can cause vomiting, nausea and diarrhoea. It’s very dehydrating and this is the main factor that contributes to the unpleasant feelings associated with a hangover.

Short-term risks

In the short-term, the risks associated with drinking too much include anxiety and depression, sexual dysfunctions, problems with judgement and reasoning leading to risky behaviour, losing consciousness, choking on vomit, slowed breathing and heart rate and poisoning.

Drinking heavily regularly is also associated with weight gain, which has numerous health risks of its own associated with it. Just an extra three or four units per day could lead to gaining a stone in two or three months.

Long-term risks

In the long-term alcohol abuse can cause a range of serious health problems. These include liver disease, damage to an unborn child, pancreatitis, high blood pressure, strokes, brain damage and many more conditions besides.

Safe drinking

To prevent developing long- and short-term health problems such as these, it’s strongly advisable to stay within the maximum alcohol unit limits outlines by the Government. This is a maximum or three or four units of alcohol per day for men and two or three for women.

This means not binge drinking – if you stay within a weekly limit but drink all the units on one night, you’re still risking your health.

If you’re concerned about your drinking, monitor how many units you’re drinking and try to cut down so that you’re within limits. If you find that you can’t cut down, consult your GP or an alcohol professional. They will assess your drinking and be able to advise you whether you need professional help and alcohol detox.

A medical professional will be able to tell you what effect alcohol is having on your body and your health. They’ll be able to give you information and guidance on the next steps for cutting down drinking.

Wellington Lodge is an established not-for-profit specialist alcohol detox and rehab provider. We offer triage, screening and rehabilitation at our comfortable in-patient facility at Wellington Lodge in North London. We also offer out-patient facilities at specialist clinics in Harley Street, London or at Queens Square in Bath, Somerset.

Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.