Tag Archives: Health

AJMC Session Traces Evolution of ACO Growth, Mental Health Delivery Models


PLAINSBORO, N.J. (PRWEB) December 17, 2014

Accountable care organizations (ACOs), created by the Affordable Care Act to tie payment to the quality of care, go through distinct phases from their formation until they can deliver the “triple aim” of population health, patient satisfaction, and savings.

Applying the lessons of the triple aim to oncology care and bringing better delivery models to mental health care were also on the agenda at the recent WebEx session for the ACO and Emerging Healthcare Delivery Coalition, an initiative of The American Journal of Managed Care.

Better Models for Mental Health Delivery

Lori Raney, MD, of Collaborative Care Consulting, addressed how behavioral health is finding its way into quality measures. While depression screening may be the only measure included in the 33 ACO measures from CMS, other behavioral health metrics exist. It is slowly being realized that in healthcare, a segmented approach to mental health makes little sense medically, and patients whose needs go unaddressed end up driving up costs elsewhere in the form of visits to the emergency department and other high-cost interventions. Nevertheless, most ACOs are still providing behavioral health services in a separate setting, she said.

Models used to integrate behavioral health services into primary care fall along a continuum, Dr. Raney explained.


    Psychiatrists may act as consultants to a practice; they are paid for a few hours a week and do not see patients directly, but discuss cases with the primary care physician (PCP).
    Behavioral health services may co-locate within the same physical space as the PCP.
    Fully embedded services place the psychiatrist or other behavioral health specialist within the PCP practice, providing both consultations and in some cases, one-on-one appointments, depending on the nature of the arrangement.
    In reverse integration, basic treatment of chronic diseases, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, is provided to patients with serious mental health problems in the psychiatrist’s office.

Dr. Raney specifically discussed the value of collaborative care, an embedded service model that increases the likelihood that patients will receive the right care and be on the right medication. The TEAMCare approach, pioneered by the University of Washington, was found to save $ 600 to $ 1100 per patient, and has led to better outcomes in both depression scores and cardiometabolic results.

Evolution of ACO Growth

This session covered the distinct steps of ACO evolution. Dave Escalante, senior vice president for OneKey and Marketing, identified four distinct phases of integrated health system growth:

    Expansion of services, which involve acquisitions and direct employment of physicians.
    Health information technology (HIT) upgrades, which create the ability to track and measure progress.
    Standardization of care, which focus on cost-effectiveness through the use of metrics, as well as protocols and pathways.
    Quality outcomes and cost reduction, as ACOs form, the most sophisticated groups assume financial risk for episodes of care.

Escalante said the direct employment of physicians, in contrast with affiliate relationships, was a “critical variable” in the ability of the ACO to achieve triple aim. “The networks that employ physicians seem to be operating at a much more efficient rate, and are evolving through that maturity spectrum at a much quicker rate than those institutions that choose a traditional affiliate relationship,” he said.

Oncology Delivery

Ira Klein, MD, MBA, FACP, of Aetna, discussed how the insurer has developed an oncology delivery model that employs value-based principles within an ACO framework. The arrival of value-based principles has been essential, he said, to uncover the $ 800 million of waste in the system and redeploy it to deliver better care. By developing and testing hypotheses, he said, Aetna has been able to identify five steps for making this transition: modeling, development of clinical analytics, value creation planning, delivery, and ongoing collaboration.

“Getting the metrics right is really difficult,” in developing value-based programs in oncology, Dr. Klein said. It’s taken Aetna almost four years, although the insurer believes it now has the model correct. Once it’s all up and running, however, payers and practices get data that allow them to make changes in the short-term. “You get a better system. Patients like it better. Outcomes are better. Providers like it better,” he said. “Technology acts as the lubricant to make it easy.”

About the ACO Coalition

As ACOs and other emerging delivery and payment models evolve and move away from traditional fee-for-service system models toward cost-effective and value-based care, the need to understand how these models will evolve is critical to building long-term strategic solutions. The mission of the ACO Coalition is to bring together a diverse group of key stakeholders, including ACO providers and leaders, payers, IDNs, specialty pharmacy, and pharmaceutical manufacturers to work collaboratively to build value and improve the quality and overall outcomes of patient care. Coalition members share ideas and best practices through live meetings, Web-based interactive sessions, and conference calls. Distinguishing features are the Coalition’s access to leading experts and its small workshops that allow creative problem-solving. To learn more, click here.

CONTACT:    

Nicole Beagin (609) 716-7777 x 131

nbeagin(at)ajmc(dot)com

http://www.ajmc.com







25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
Simple But Very Effective Manipulations If You Get: Toothache, Headache, Hiccup, Heartburn, Fatigue, Alcohol Intoxication, Rapid Heart, High Blood Pressure, Constipation, Syncope, Back Pain, Cough, Pregnancy Vomiting, Cold, Runny Nose, Insomnia, Etc.
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

Drinking Eight Glasses a Day Still the Standard for Health Reports Fresh Water Advocate

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) December 17, 2014

Is the standard recommendation to drink “eight glasses of water a day” an outdated myth, as many health journalists now claim? To water advocate and radio host Sharon Kleyne, eight glasses is not a myth. In an era of climate change, air pollution and widespread drought, says Kleyne, drinking a minimum of eight glasses of fresh water each day is more important than ever. Kleyne discussed the daily drinking water controversy on her Sharon Kleyne Hour™ Power of Water® radio broadcast of December 15, 2014 (Live show or podcast: http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2207/the-sharon-kleyne-hour).    

The syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour™ Power of Water® radio show, hosted by fresh water advocate Sharon Kleyne, is heard weekly on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes. The show is sponsored by Bio Logic Aqua® Research, a global research and technology center founded by Kleyne and specializing in fresh water, the atmosphere and dehydration. Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry and dehydrated eyes.

“Myth” advocates are correct in their claim that no two people have identical daily water requirements, Kleyne acknowledges.* On the other hand, every human spends its first nine months in water and life is a constant struggle to combat dehydration (water loss). The human body is about 70 percent water (varying from 40 percent to 85 percent), and requires an influx of fresh water every day to replace the large amounts of waste water the body expels every daily.

*Young, K., “How much water should you drink a day?” Telegrapyh.com, November 28, 2014

http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/beauty/news-features/TMG11258086/How-much-water-should-you-drink-a-day.html

Any health recommendation that downplays the importance of adequate daily fresh water intake, in Kleyne’s view, puts the public at risk.

Eight glasses a day at eight ounces per glass, or 64 ounces, says Kleyne, is the minimum for most adults. Some doctors recommend drinking half one’s body weight in ounces per day. By this standard, a 180 pound person should consume 90 ounces.

Kleyne would apply the “half your body weight rule” only to people weighing under 128 pounds, including children (half of 128 in ounces is 64). For everyone else, she recommends a minimum of eight glasses – preferably 10 – and even more if you have a fever, just finished strenuous exercise, live in a dry or polluted area, work outdoors, take dehydrating medication (that gives you dry mouth), or experience dehydration symptoms such as dry mouth, skin or eyes, fatigue or thirst.

Thirst is a good indicator that body needs water, Kleyne agrees. However, she adds, as we age the thirst reflex diminishes, so the absence of thirst does not necessarily mean the body does not need water.

Another controversy, Kleyne explains, is whether coffee, tea, juice, soft drinks, or water rich foods such as apples, watermelons and celery, count towards the eight glasses. According to the US government, says Kleyne, they do. According to the British government, they do not. However, the British acknowledge fruit and unsweetened juice as secondary water sources.†

† “Fresh water advocate Sharon Kleyne concerned with new study results that less than 1% of UK drinks enough water,” PR Web, November 14, 2014

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12327383.htm

To absorb and utilize water, Kleyne explains, the body must first turn it into pure water. By drinking unadulterated fresh water in the first place, water is absorbed more easily. Caffeinated, heavily sugared and alcoholic drinks should be avoided because they are dehydrating. Fruit and unsweetened juices are excellent secondary water sources. Water with twist of lemon, or caffeine and sugar free tea, would be counted.

Cold water, according to Kleyne, is more likely to make one go to the bathroom than warm water. Kleyne’s solution: In hot weather, cold water may be beneficial because it cools as well as hydrates. The rest of the year, warm water is preferred.‡

‡“Our bodies need eight glasses a day even in winter reports fresh water advocate,” PR Web, November 21, 2014

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12345150.htm

Kleyne suggests drinking one’s water in whole glass rather than sipping, with two full glasses upon rising.

All humans, Kleyne concludes, are as least slightly dehydrated or will soon be, and would benefit from additional water. Because water is essential to every organ, structure and cell in the body, including the immune system, the single most important step towards good health is to pay attention to hydration and consume a minimum of eight glasses a day.







25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
Simple But Very Effective Manipulations If You Get: Toothache, Headache, Hiccup, Heartburn, Fatigue, Alcohol Intoxication, Rapid Heart, High Blood Pressure, Constipation, Syncope, Back Pain, Cough, Pregnancy Vomiting, Cold, Runny Nose, Insomnia, Etc.
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
Simple But Very Effective Manipulations If You Get: Toothache, Headache, Hiccup, Heartburn, Fatigue, Alcohol Intoxication, Rapid Heart, High Blood Pressure, Constipation, Syncope, Back Pain, Cough, Pregnancy Vomiting, Cold, Runny Nose, Insomnia, Etc.
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

Drinking Eight Glasses a Day Still the Standard for Health Reports Fresh Water Advocate

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) December 17, 2014

Is the standard recommendation to drink “eight glasses of water a day” an outdated myth, as many health journalists now claim? To water advocate and radio host Sharon Kleyne, eight glasses is not a myth. In an era of climate change, air pollution and widespread drought, says Kleyne, drinking a minimum of eight glasses of fresh water each day is more important than ever. Kleyne discussed the daily drinking water controversy on her Sharon Kleyne Hour™ Power of Water® radio broadcast of December 15, 2014 (Live show or podcast: http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2207/the-sharon-kleyne-hour).    

The syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour™ Power of Water® radio show, hosted by fresh water advocate Sharon Kleyne, is heard weekly on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes. The show is sponsored by Bio Logic Aqua® Research, a global research and technology center founded by Kleyne and specializing in fresh water, the atmosphere and dehydration. Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry and dehydrated eyes.

“Myth” advocates are correct in their claim that no two people have identical daily water requirements, Kleyne acknowledges.* On the other hand, every human spends its first nine months in water and life is a constant struggle to combat dehydration (water loss). The human body is about 70 percent water (varying from 40 percent to 85 percent), and requires an influx of fresh water every day to replace the large amounts of waste water the body expels every daily.

*Young, K., “How much water should you drink a day?” Telegrapyh.com, November 28, 2014

http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/beauty/news-features/TMG11258086/How-much-water-should-you-drink-a-day.html

Any health recommendation that downplays the importance of adequate daily fresh water intake, in Kleyne’s view, puts the public at risk.

Eight glasses a day at eight ounces per glass, or 64 ounces, says Kleyne, is the minimum for most adults. Some doctors recommend drinking half one’s body weight in ounces per day. By this standard, a 180 pound person should consume 90 ounces.

Kleyne would apply the “half your body weight rule” only to people weighing under 128 pounds, including children (half of 128 in ounces is 64). For everyone else, she recommends a minimum of eight glasses – preferably 10 – and even more if you have a fever, just finished strenuous exercise, live in a dry or polluted area, work outdoors, take dehydrating medication (that gives you dry mouth), or experience dehydration symptoms such as dry mouth, skin or eyes, fatigue or thirst.

Thirst is a good indicator that body needs water, Kleyne agrees. However, she adds, as we age the thirst reflex diminishes, so the absence of thirst does not necessarily mean the body does not need water.

Another controversy, Kleyne explains, is whether coffee, tea, juice, soft drinks, or water rich foods such as apples, watermelons and celery, count towards the eight glasses. According to the US government, says Kleyne, they do. According to the British government, they do not. However, the British acknowledge fruit and unsweetened juice as secondary water sources.†

† “Fresh water advocate Sharon Kleyne concerned with new study results that less than 1% of UK drinks enough water,” PR Web, November 14, 2014

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12327383.htm

To absorb and utilize water, Kleyne explains, the body must first turn it into pure water. By drinking unadulterated fresh water in the first place, water is absorbed more easily. Caffeinated, heavily sugared and alcoholic drinks should be avoided because they are dehydrating. Fruit and unsweetened juices are excellent secondary water sources. Water with twist of lemon, or caffeine and sugar free tea, would be counted.

Cold water, according to Kleyne, is more likely to make one go to the bathroom than warm water. Kleyne’s solution: In hot weather, cold water may be beneficial because it cools as well as hydrates. The rest of the year, warm water is preferred.‡

‡“Our bodies need eight glasses a day even in winter reports fresh water advocate,” PR Web, November 21, 2014

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12345150.htm

Kleyne suggests drinking one’s water in whole glass rather than sipping, with two full glasses upon rising.

All humans, Kleyne concludes, are as least slightly dehydrated or will soon be, and would benefit from additional water. Because water is essential to every organ, structure and cell in the body, including the immune system, the single most important step towards good health is to pay attention to hydration and consume a minimum of eight glasses a day.







AJMC Session Traces Evolution of ACO Growth, Mental Health Delivery Models


PLAINSBORO, N.J. (PRWEB) December 17, 2014

Accountable care organizations (ACOs), created by the Affordable Care Act to tie payment to the quality of care, go through distinct phases from their formation until they can deliver the “triple aim” of population health, patient satisfaction, and savings.

Applying the lessons of the triple aim to oncology care and bringing better delivery models to mental health care were also on the agenda at the recent WebEx session for the ACO and Emerging Healthcare Delivery Coalition, an initiative of The American Journal of Managed Care.

Better Models for Mental Health Delivery

Lori Raney, MD, of Collaborative Care Consulting, addressed how behavioral health is finding its way into quality measures. While depression screening may be the only measure included in the 33 ACO measures from CMS, other behavioral health metrics exist. It is slowly being realized that in healthcare, a segmented approach to mental health makes little sense medically, and patients whose needs go unaddressed end up driving up costs elsewhere in the form of visits to the emergency department and other high-cost interventions. Nevertheless, most ACOs are still providing behavioral health services in a separate setting, she said.

Models used to integrate behavioral health services into primary care fall along a continuum, Dr. Raney explained.


    Psychiatrists may act as consultants to a practice; they are paid for a few hours a week and do not see patients directly, but discuss cases with the primary care physician (PCP).
    Behavioral health services may co-locate within the same physical space as the PCP.
    Fully embedded services place the psychiatrist or other behavioral health specialist within the PCP practice, providing both consultations and in some cases, one-on-one appointments, depending on the nature of the arrangement.
    In reverse integration, basic treatment of chronic diseases, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, is provided to patients with serious mental health problems in the psychiatrist’s office.

Dr. Raney specifically discussed the value of collaborative care, an embedded service model that increases the likelihood that patients will receive the right care and be on the right medication. The TEAMCare approach, pioneered by the University of Washington, was found to save $ 600 to $ 1100 per patient, and has led to better outcomes in both depression scores and cardiometabolic results.

Evolution of ACO Growth

This session covered the distinct steps of ACO evolution. Dave Escalante, senior vice president for OneKey and Marketing, identified four distinct phases of integrated health system growth:

    Expansion of services, which involve acquisitions and direct employment of physicians.
    Health information technology (HIT) upgrades, which create the ability to track and measure progress.
    Standardization of care, which focus on cost-effectiveness through the use of metrics, as well as protocols and pathways.
    Quality outcomes and cost reduction, as ACOs form, the most sophisticated groups assume financial risk for episodes of care.

Escalante said the direct employment of physicians, in contrast with affiliate relationships, was a “critical variable” in the ability of the ACO to achieve triple aim. “The networks that employ physicians seem to be operating at a much more efficient rate, and are evolving through that maturity spectrum at a much quicker rate than those institutions that choose a traditional affiliate relationship,” he said.

Oncology Delivery

Ira Klein, MD, MBA, FACP, of Aetna, discussed how the insurer has developed an oncology delivery model that employs value-based principles within an ACO framework. The arrival of value-based principles has been essential, he said, to uncover the $ 800 million of waste in the system and redeploy it to deliver better care. By developing and testing hypotheses, he said, Aetna has been able to identify five steps for making this transition: modeling, development of clinical analytics, value creation planning, delivery, and ongoing collaboration.

“Getting the metrics right is really difficult,” in developing value-based programs in oncology, Dr. Klein said. It’s taken Aetna almost four years, although the insurer believes it now has the model correct. Once it’s all up and running, however, payers and practices get data that allow them to make changes in the short-term. “You get a better system. Patients like it better. Outcomes are better. Providers like it better,” he said. “Technology acts as the lubricant to make it easy.”

About the ACO Coalition

As ACOs and other emerging delivery and payment models evolve and move away from traditional fee-for-service system models toward cost-effective and value-based care, the need to understand how these models will evolve is critical to building long-term strategic solutions. The mission of the ACO Coalition is to bring together a diverse group of key stakeholders, including ACO providers and leaders, payers, IDNs, specialty pharmacy, and pharmaceutical manufacturers to work collaboratively to build value and improve the quality and overall outcomes of patient care. Coalition members share ideas and best practices through live meetings, Web-based interactive sessions, and conference calls. Distinguishing features are the Coalition’s access to leading experts and its small workshops that allow creative problem-solving. To learn more, click here.

CONTACT:    

Nicole Beagin (609) 716-7777 x 131

nbeagin(at)ajmc(dot)com

http://www.ajmc.com







25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
Simple But Very Effective Manipulations If You Get: Toothache, Headache, Hiccup, Heartburn, Fatigue, Alcohol Intoxication, Rapid Heart, High Blood Pressure, Constipation, Syncope, Back Pain, Cough, Pregnancy Vomiting, Cold, Runny Nose, Insomnia, Etc.
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

AJMC Session Traces Evolution of ACO Growth, Mental Health Delivery Models


PLAINSBORO, N.J. (PRWEB) December 17, 2014

Accountable care organizations (ACOs), created by the Affordable Care Act to tie payment to the quality of care, go through distinct phases from their formation until they can deliver the “triple aim” of population health, patient satisfaction, and savings.

Applying the lessons of the triple aim to oncology care and bringing better delivery models to mental health care were also on the agenda at the recent WebEx session for the ACO and Emerging Healthcare Delivery Coalition, an initiative of The American Journal of Managed Care.

Better Models for Mental Health Delivery

Lori Raney, MD, of Collaborative Care Consulting, addressed how behavioral health is finding its way into quality measures. While depression screening may be the only measure included in the 33 ACO measures from CMS, other behavioral health metrics exist. It is slowly being realized that in healthcare, a segmented approach to mental health makes little sense medically, and patients whose needs go unaddressed end up driving up costs elsewhere in the form of visits to the emergency department and other high-cost interventions. Nevertheless, most ACOs are still providing behavioral health services in a separate setting, she said.

Models used to integrate behavioral health services into primary care fall along a continuum, Dr. Raney explained.


    Psychiatrists may act as consultants to a practice; they are paid for a few hours a week and do not see patients directly, but discuss cases with the primary care physician (PCP).
    Behavioral health services may co-locate within the same physical space as the PCP.
    Fully embedded services place the psychiatrist or other behavioral health specialist within the PCP practice, providing both consultations and in some cases, one-on-one appointments, depending on the nature of the arrangement.
    In reverse integration, basic treatment of chronic diseases, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, is provided to patients with serious mental health problems in the psychiatrist’s office.

Dr. Raney specifically discussed the value of collaborative care, an embedded service model that increases the likelihood that patients will receive the right care and be on the right medication. The TEAMCare approach, pioneered by the University of Washington, was found to save $ 600 to $ 1100 per patient, and has led to better outcomes in both depression scores and cardiometabolic results.

Evolution of ACO Growth

This session covered the distinct steps of ACO evolution. Dave Escalante, senior vice president for OneKey and Marketing, identified four distinct phases of integrated health system growth:

    Expansion of services, which involve acquisitions and direct employment of physicians.
    Health information technology (HIT) upgrades, which create the ability to track and measure progress.
    Standardization of care, which focus on cost-effectiveness through the use of metrics, as well as protocols and pathways.
    Quality outcomes and cost reduction, as ACOs form, the most sophisticated groups assume financial risk for episodes of care.

Escalante said the direct employment of physicians, in contrast with affiliate relationships, was a “critical variable” in the ability of the ACO to achieve triple aim. “The networks that employ physicians seem to be operating at a much more efficient rate, and are evolving through that maturity spectrum at a much quicker rate than those institutions that choose a traditional affiliate relationship,” he said.

Oncology Delivery

Ira Klein, MD, MBA, FACP, of Aetna, discussed how the insurer has developed an oncology delivery model that employs value-based principles within an ACO framework. The arrival of value-based principles has been essential, he said, to uncover the $ 800 million of waste in the system and redeploy it to deliver better care. By developing and testing hypotheses, he said, Aetna has been able to identify five steps for making this transition: modeling, development of clinical analytics, value creation planning, delivery, and ongoing collaboration.

“Getting the metrics right is really difficult,” in developing value-based programs in oncology, Dr. Klein said. It’s taken Aetna almost four years, although the insurer believes it now has the model correct. Once it’s all up and running, however, payers and practices get data that allow them to make changes in the short-term. “You get a better system. Patients like it better. Outcomes are better. Providers like it better,” he said. “Technology acts as the lubricant to make it easy.”

About the ACO Coalition

As ACOs and other emerging delivery and payment models evolve and move away from traditional fee-for-service system models toward cost-effective and value-based care, the need to understand how these models will evolve is critical to building long-term strategic solutions. The mission of the ACO Coalition is to bring together a diverse group of key stakeholders, including ACO providers and leaders, payers, IDNs, specialty pharmacy, and pharmaceutical manufacturers to work collaboratively to build value and improve the quality and overall outcomes of patient care. Coalition members share ideas and best practices through live meetings, Web-based interactive sessions, and conference calls. Distinguishing features are the Coalition’s access to leading experts and its small workshops that allow creative problem-solving. To learn more, click here.

CONTACT:    

Nicole Beagin (609) 716-7777 x 131

nbeagin(at)ajmc(dot)com

http://www.ajmc.com







25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health

25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health
Simple But Very Effective Manipulations If You Get: Toothache, Headache, Hiccup, Heartburn, Fatigue, Alcohol Intoxication, Rapid Heart, High Blood Pressure, Constipation, Syncope, Back Pain, Cough, Pregnancy Vomiting, Cold, Runny Nose, Insomnia, Etc.
25 Magical Manipulations For Your Health