Tag Archives: Health

Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Vitamin A – Overdose Can Cause Severe Health Problems

Carrot consists of an essential vitamin that can help your eyes evolve correctly. Vitamin A is in charge of the excellent visual acuity. You may have found out this information with your elementary scientific disciplines subjects. Quite possibly your folks could have told you to eat your carrots as they are nourishing and healthy. You will find many more things about this orange and crispy vegetable that fulfills the eye needed supplementation on the subject of Vitamin A. You’re going to be amazed at simply how much healthier and stronger you will end up being in the event you incorporate this necessary vitamin in what you eat.

We all know, vitamin A, often referred to as retinol, is extremely useful on the subject of vision improvement. Your vision is adjusted to modifications in the lighting effects. This particular variation will reduce vision issues that unexpected illumination can cause. Retinol even offers assistance for preserving the eyes, mucous walls, and the skin hydrated all the time.

Vitamin A even offers antioxidant attributes. All these reduce the effects of toxins which may gather out of physical operations. Toxins could potentially cause illnesses and tissue or cellular deterioration. Vitamin A assists in keeping the body healthy through the elimination of these types of chemicals.

If you would like include Vitamin A in what you eat, you then should be aware of exactly what sources have substantial Vitamin A material. Aside from the old fashioned carrot, these are some food resources that you need to think about consuming. Beef liver features an enormous supply of vitamin A for your system. Additionally, it includes abundant protein material that one could likewise take advantage of. Egg yolks are low-cost resources of Vitamin A. Really being full of this vitamin, egg yolks are appropriate for your everyday minimum amount requirements. Fortified milk is an excellent resource for the numerous vitamins and minerals the body demands. Including additional minerals like calcium as well as other vitamin, prepared milk additionally has a wholesome quantity of Vitamin A.

Keep your vitamin A intake moderate.
Despite the fact that Vitamin A is, without a doubt, healthy for your system, it’s not necessary to consume too much quantities or eliminate it from a diet plan. The perfect every day level of vitamin A for adult men is 800 mcg when for adult women is 1000 mcg. A few unwanted side effects can occur if you don’t have Vitamin A. You might have night loss of sight, eye swelling, diarrhea, as well as other health issues. You need to at least consume the lowest every day requirement of the vitamin to avoid any kind of problems.

Just like missing vitamin A damages the body, try not to take it too much! Vitamin A overdose leads to irritability, a sick stomach, and mild blurry eyesight. Furthermore, some individuals were recorded to have hair thinning, growth retardation, plus the overdose’s most severe type, increased spleen and liver. A Vitamin is a vital compound for your body. It will help improve your vision and soften the skin. Additionally, it will detox your body taking out the toxins in your metabolism. Preserve things at the average and consume a nutritious diet with food items abundant in Vitamin A. Never exaggerate using the vitamin and you will live a wholesome life.

Click here to know more about vitamin a supplements and its related product vitamin b12 supplements as they are very vital health products

Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne Calls for Greater Women Participation in Water and Health Issues

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 19, 2014

Since the earliest prehistoric times, women have played a dominant role in caring for the sick and obtaining the necessary fresh water that sustains all terrestrial life. Citing these traditional roles of women, water activist Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, has issued a challenge to the world’s women to take the lead in education and participation to assure that proper medical care and abundant, safe and sustainable fresh water are available to everyone, everywhere.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a global research and technology center specializing in and fresh water, the atmosphere and the effects of dehydration. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s signature product for dry eyes. Kleyne’s globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Over the eons of human existence predating civilization and the written word, says Kleyne, gender roles were well defined and rarely circumvented. Men hunted and prayed to the gods and women cooked, maintained households, raised children, cared for the ill and elderly, gathered herbs and non-game food, and fetched water. In many parts of the world, these roles have not changed

In a recent radio broadcast, Kleyne expressed the belief that humankind would be well served if some of these traditional roles were brought back. As healers, nurturers and peacemakers, Kleyne sees an important and expanded role for women in global life and death issues such as water security, safety and sustainability and in health and healing. Kleyne’s own global work, including the Netherlands based Women for Water Partnership, reflects this conviction.

Kleyne has extensively researched the role of women in water and healing. In prehistoric times, says Kleyne, when someone became ill, the women, who usually had considerable knowledge of herbal and traditional medicine, cared for that person. Some of their healing herbs, such as aspirin (willow bark), opium, digitalis (foxglove) and quinine (a rot fungus on trees), are still in use today.

Shamans, who were frequently – but not always – men, contributed mystical incantations and a purported spiritual connection. Shamans, Kleyne explains, were usually individuals who had a mystical experience while sick or injured – and were nursed back to health by a woman healer.

After about 5,000 BCE, when agriculture and civilization took hold and the various jobs in society become increasingly specialized, says Kleyne, healing became a full-time – and mostly male – profession. The most famous early doctors, such as Hippocrates and Maimonedes, and most of the early medical text writers, were male. Men also designed and built the great aqueducts and other water distribution systems.

A notable exception was Saint Hildegard of Bingen (1098? – 1179), says Kleyne. Hildegard was a nun, abbess, poet, composer, philosopher, theologian, herbalist and healer. One of history’s great geniuses, Hildegard wrote dozens of books, including major texts on herbs and healing – based on knowledge she acquired from running the monastery’s infirmary and herb garden. One of the few women allowed to speak in church, Hildegard went on several evangelical tours.

The role of women as caretakers of children, the elderly and the sick; and as fetchers of water, persists today, according to Kleyne. The sad news is that in some poor rural areas of developing nations, “traditional women’s work” has become a weapon of repression. Women cannot go to school or participate in the community because cooking, caring for children and fetching water take up all their time.

Interestingly, Kleyne points out, in villages in Africa, Asia and Central America, where women have been freed from some of their traditional responsibilities, they have become active community leaders and successful entrepreneurs. Female entrepreneurs are now a major economic force in Kenya and other African nations. Their greatest contributions have been in water supply and community health.

Kleyne’s lifelong dedication and mission is to conduct research and educate the world that there is nothing more important to life on Earth than fresh water and that for the health and survival of the human species, we must find ways to come together and devise sustainable solutions to the global water and health crises. Kleyne’s personal objective is to assure that the world’s fresh water supply – including the water in the atmosphere – is sufficient, safe, secure and affordable everywhere and for everyone. She wants future generations of children to know that we cared.







Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.