Tag Archives: Health

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Natural Health Doctor Releases New Chelation Therapy Book


Tampa, Florida (PRWEB) March 24, 2015

Those looking to learn more about how they can naturally detoxify their body can find the answers to that and more in a new book titled “Chelation and Other Detox Methods to Save Your Life,” by Dr. Edward Kondrot, a world renowned natural health doctor. The book is scheduled for release on March 30, 2015 and will be available online and in stores. The book features interviews Dr. Kondrot conducted with 16 leading natural health experts in the country, offering a wide variety of information on detoxifying the body naturally.

“With the way we live our lives today there are many ways we are surrounded by toxins,” explains Dr. Edward Kondrot, founder of the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center. He is also the immediate past president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association, and the clinic director of Integrative Medicine of the American Medical College of Homeopathy. “These toxins can become such a part of our body and lives that they begin to wreak havoc on our health. The good news is there are numerous effective ways to help detoxify the body of them.”

Unfortunately, everyone in the country has been exposed to a wide variety of toxins. They enter our water supply, food, air, and more. They are largely put into the environment by the way we live our lives, including using pesticides, chemical fertilizers, sewage, cadmium, mercury, and other routes. Those toxins and heavy metals can build up in the body, leading to numerous health problems, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

The new book, “Chelation and Other Detox Methods to Save Your Life,” provides information on how toxins can be removed from the body in order to restore health, including improving one’s memory and vision. Topics covered in the book include detoxifying naturally, Chelation Therapy, mercury, how our planet is poisoned, holistic dental care, oxidative therapies, and helping the metabolism. The book covers the most effective natural treatments available to us in those areas.

“The information provided in this book is ground breaking, based on the most current research, and not to be missed,” adds Dr. Kondrot. “Whether you need the treatments or you work in a medical practice that provides them, you will come away learning something new and helpful.”

Leading natural health experts interviewed in the “Chelation and Other Detox Methods to Save Your Life” book include Terry Chappell, Bruce Dooley, Dennis Courtney, Dorothy Merritt, Robban Sica, Pieter DeWet, John Trowbridge, Marina Johnson, Robert Rowen, Garry Gordon, Lee Cowden, Martin Dayton, Jeff Kotulski, David Nebbling, W. Carl McMillan, and David Minkoff. There will also be a Chelation Therapy Conference held at the Dolphin Beach Resort in the Tampa area, on April 17-19, 2015.

For more information about the Chelation Therapy Conference, or to register, visit the site online at http://www.chelation2015.com. For more information about Dr. Kondrot, visit his site at http://www.healingtheeye.com.

About Healing The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located in Tampa, Fla. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also the immediate past president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association, and the clinic director of Integrative Medicine of the American Medical College of Homeopathy. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit http://www.healingtheeye.com.







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Avoiding Addiction When Powerful Opioid Painkillers Are Needed, From the November 2013 Harvard Health Letter


Boston, MA (PRWEB) November 12, 2013

Sometimes the best way to ease pain is with the type of prescription painkiller known as an opioid. Despite their “addictive” reputation in the media, the majority of people use opioids safely and without addition, reports the November 2013 Harvard Health Letter.

Opioids are a class of painkillers with high addictive potential. They include oxycodone (OxyContin), hydrocodone (Vicodin), hydromorphone (Dilaudid), and meperidine (Demerol). Opioids are typically used for the short term, such as for treating severe pain following surgery. They are also sometimes used long-term for relieving pain related to cancer or a terminal illness.

For minor surgical pain or injuries, it’s best to limit the use of an opioid to no more than seven days. Using one for more than 30 days leads to dependence. That means a person begins to suffer withdrawal symptoms if he or she abruptly stops taking the medication. With long-term use, some individuals need more of these drugs to achieve the same effect. Keep in mind that dependence is not the same as addiction, which is characterized by compulsive use and preoccupation with the drug that interferes with normal life.

For long-term use, take opioids by the clock as prescribed, advises Dr. Karsten Kueppenbender, an addiction psychiatrist at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital. Trying to reduce addiction risk by cutting back on the medication and waiting until the pain gets really bad isn’t a good strategy, and can actually backfire. The memory of how bad the pain got, and the sense of relief from the opioid, could actually increase the risk of becoming addicted.

The key to avoiding addiction is the assistance of a medical team that’s easily accessible, along with regular checkups to reassess the need for—and use of—the drug.

Read the full-length article: “Caution: These are the most addictive pain meds”.

Also in the November 2013 issue of the Harvard Health Letter:

    Steps for coping with mild cognitive impairment
    The best fruits and veggies for fall
    An anti-falling checklist to take stock of trip hazards in the home

The Harvard Health Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $ 16 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/health or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).







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Two Soldiers Prescribed 54 Drugs: Military Mental Health “Treatment” Becomes Frankenpharmacy


Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) October 31, 2012

By Kelly Patricia O’Meara, for the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR)

“The devastating adverse effects mind-altering psychiatric drugs may be having on the nation’s military troops are best summed up by Mary Shelley’s Dr. Frankenstein, writing ‘nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.’

“Just as the fictional character, Dr. Frankenstein, turned to experiments in the laboratory to create life with fantastically horrific results, the psychiatric community, along with its pharmaceutical sidekicks, has turned to modern day chemical concoctions to alter the human mind. The result is what many believe is a growing number of equally hideous results culminating in senseless deaths, tormented lives and grief-stricken families.

“The nation’s military troops are taking their lives at record numbers and seemingly healthy soldiers are dying from sudden unexplained deaths. That’s a fact. The data are clear, yet, despite growing evidence pointing to the enemy among us, the monstrous psycho-pharmacological experiment continues.”

In the second installment of a four-part series, O’Meara examines the sudden unexplained deaths within the military tied to psychiatric drug use, including two soldiers who between them, were prescribed a whopping 54 drugs including Seroquel, Effexor, Paxil, Prozac, Remeron, Wellbutrin, Xanax, Zoloft, Ativan, Celexa, Cymbalta, Depakote, Haldol, Klonopin, Lexapro, Lithium, Lunesta, Compazine, Desyrel, Trileptal and Valium.


Marine corporal Andrew White, was a healthy 23-year-old, gung-ho Marine returning from a nine-month tour in Iraq, who, like so many of his brothers in arms, suffered from the seemingly normal stresses of war – insomnia, nightmares and restlessness. The young corporal turned to the military’s mental health system for help. But eleven months after beginning his first cocktail of mind-altering psychiatric drugs, he died in his sleep from what the medical examiner ruled an “accidental overdose of medication.” Since taking his first multi-drug cocktail to the date of his death, White had been prescribed no less than nineteen different drugs with many at ever-increasing dosages.

Twenty-three -year old Anthony (Tony) Mena had completed two tours in Iraq as part of Kirtland Air Force Base’s 377th Security Forces Squadron. Like so many others returning from combat, Mena suffered from insomnia, restlessness and nightmares—and like Andrew White, became a victim of the military’s mental health mind-altering multi-drug approach to treatment. Between January of 2008 and his death in July 2009, Mena had been prescribed no less than 35 prescription drugs, including numerous antidepressants, pain killers, tranquilizers and muscle relaxers.

O’Meara details how these two men exemplify the ever-increasing numbers of young, seemingly healthy soldiers who survived the horrors of war only to return home to fight, and lose, their toughest battle. They are among a growing list of sudden deaths among military personnel, which many believe is due to sudden cardiac arrest brought on by the drug cocktails being prescribed. Fred Baughman Jr., MD, who has been researching these questionable deaths, believes that the few that are known are just the “tip of the iceberg.”

Kelly Patricia O’Meara is a book author and former award winning investigative reporter for the Washington Times, Insight Magazine. Prior to working as an investigative journalist, O’Meara spent sixteen years on Capitol Hill as a congressional staffer to four Members of Congress. She holds a B.S. in Political Science from the University of Maryland.

Read the full article here.

Read the previous article, Psychiatric Drugs & War: A Suicide Mission here.

Visit CCHR’s Psychiatric Drug Side Effects database, comprising summaries of all international drug regulatory warnings, studies, and more than 470,000 adverse reaction reports filed with the US FDA.

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR has helped to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive mental health practices.







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Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







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Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety Recommends Two Practices to Adopt After Pediatric Opioid Trial Halted


Chicago, IL (PRWEB) January 29, 2015

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety just released two practices to adopt after a pediatric opioids trial was recently halted.

With more than 500,000 pediatric tonsillectomies performed each year in the United States, removal of tonsils is one of the most common surgeries performed on children. According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, tonsillectomy is performed 20 percent for infection and 80 percent for obstructive sleep apnea.

Children undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy are routinely given morphine to manage their pain following surgery. This standard practice of using morphine is being called into question by a recent study conducted by the Motherisk Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and by McMaster University and McMaster Children’s Hospital.

The study results were published in the January 2015 issue of Pediatrics, after the study’s Drug Safety Monitoring Board halted the trial following an interim analysis which strongly demonstrated a high degree of risk of respiratory compromise associated with the use of morphine. One child even suffered a life-threatening adverse drug reaction including oxygen desaturation after being treated with morphine.

Gina Pugliese, RN, MS (Vice president, Premier Safety Institute) encourages the safe and responsible use of opioids, “We need to promote the safe and responsible use of opioids. One place to start is with common procedures like tonsillectomies. The Motherisk Program shows us that opioids can be safely and effectively be replaced with non-opioid alternatives. That said, if opioids must be used, to prevent respiratory depression and improve safety, patients receiving opioids should be continuously electronically monitored.”

“Opioids should be prescribed cautiously, not routinely, for pediatric procedures,” says Michael Wong, JD (Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety). “If opioids are prescribed, we recommend adopting continuous respiratory monitoring of these patients receiving opioids with pulse oximetry for oxygenation and with capnography for adequacy of ventilation to improve timely recognition of respiratory depression, decompensation or clinical deterioration.”

For more on the two practice recommendations, please visit http://www.ppahs.org

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve health care delivery. For more information, please go to http://www.ppahs.org







Don’t let a blood clot spoil your travel plans, from the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch

Boston, MA (PRWEB) March 20, 2015

Blood clots can develop in the legs during hours of sitting in a plane, train, or automobile, a condition called deep-vein thrombosis (DVT). These clots can be painful, and even deadly, reports the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

If a blood clot grows in a leg vein, it can interfere with circulation in the leg, causing pain and swelling. Sometimes a small piece of the clot breaks off and travels to another part of the body — this tiny traveler is known as an embolus. A pulmonary embolus — a clot that lodges in the lungs — can block the flow of oxygen to the body, leading to fatigue, breathlessness, chest pain, and even death. Approximately 300,000 people die from pulmonary embolism in the United States every year.

“It usually takes more than a single factor for DVT to develop,” says Dr. Julianne Stoughton, a vascular surgeon at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Age is one factor; the chance of developing a blood clot begins to increase after age 40 and continues to rise throughout life. Inactivity imposed by travel is another. Taking a medication that promotes blood clotting, as well as conditions like factor V Leiden mutation, cancer, and heart disease, also increase the risk.

Several preventive measures can reduce the risk of developing a blood clot when you’re on the road or in the air:

Wear compression stockings. These aren’t the thick, rubbery, beige hose of yesteryear. Compression stockings are now virtually indistinguishable from opaque hose and come in a variety of colors. Made from an elastic material, they exert more pressure at the ankle than at the calf. This helps send blood back up through the veins to the heart.

Move around. Take a break every hour. When on a plane, bus, or train, walk the aisles; when driving, stop at a rest area. While seated, practice tracing the letters of the alphabet in the air with one foot, then the other, using the big toe as a “pen point.”

Stay awake. Don’t take a sleeping pill. A long nap in a seated position lets blood pool in the legs.

Keep hydrated. Drink plenty of water. Avoid alcohol, which is dehydrating. Staying hydrated may mean more bathroom visits, but getting up and walking down the aisle keeps blood circulating.

Wear loose clothing. It’s less likely to restrict blood flow.

Ask a doctor about taking low-dose aspirin. There is some evidence that a taking a baby aspirin before a trip can prevent blood clots.

Read the full-length article: “Healthy travel: Don’t let this common hazard spoil your best-laid plans”

Also in the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch:

    Breast cancer isn’t as deadly for older women
    How core exercises can help neck pain
    What you may not know about pelvic organ prolapse
    How music improves memory and mood

Harvard Women’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $ 20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/womens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

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Media: Contact Kristen Rapoza at hhpmedia(AT)hms.harvard.edu for a complimentary copy of the newsletter, or to receive our press releases directly.







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Bergen County Organizations Team Up to Offer Optimal Mental Health and Substance Use Services


(PRWEB) March 20, 2015

On March 11, 2015 Care Plus NJ, Inc. (“CarePlus”) and Turning Point, Inc. officially launched their Partnership in Recovery with a symbolic “Ribbon Tying” event at the CarePlus Headquarters in Paramus. The Partnership consists of a compilation of “Turning Point at CarePlus” programs created to serve adolescents and adults who are experiencing issues with both substance use and their mental health.

Often times those with co-occurring substance use and mental health issues get lost between the cracks because they don’t know how to access appropriate care. With the new partnership, there is no wrong door. Those in need of services are encouraged to call CarePlus admissions (201-986-5000), however they can contact either organization and will be directed to the appropriate care.

“We found that we were stretched,” Joe Masciandaro, CEO of CarePlus, explained at the start of the event. “When people have a problem, they may not necessarily go through the right door.”

With Turning Point’s specialty in substance use treatment and recovery, CarePlus will be able to offer more comprehensive services to existing clients. Likewise, Turning Point is able to offer new services for adolescents because of the expertise CarePlus has in working with families and children.

“There is a synergistic effect when two people work together to bring the best of what they are,” commented Pat White, Vice President of Clinical Services at Turning Point, “with the establishment of this partnership, lives can be saved.”

White went on to highlight a few historical partnerships that forever altered the sense of what is possible, including Louis and Clark’s expedition, as well as the flight of the Wright Brothers.

“At a time when addiction and mental health agencies were competing for new grants and funding opportunities, Turning Point and CarePlus were cultivating this collaboration that enables each program to continue to deliver the highest quality of services to the most complex clients within its area of expertise,” said Chris Barton, Acting CEO of Turning Point. “Together we can do more, and do it better, than either of our programs could have done alone.”

By capitalizing on the strengths of each other, both organizations are benefiting. More importantly, it is the individuals and families that they serve that will benefit the most.

“At the age when I started [using substances] I didn’t realize I had a problem,” began a client of Turning Point at CarePlus. “I didn’t know I had an addiction, and I didn’t know that it was a disease.”

In a manifesto of her experience with substance use disorder, she went on to explain how addiction does not discriminate, it can affect anybody regardless of race, social class, religion, or age.

“I want to help other addicts who are suffering,” concluded the client in her statement. She shared that it is a long journey through recovery, and without agencies like CarePlus and Turning Point, she would be lost. Thanks to these services she has learned how to cope and thrive in daily life, and is motivated to help others do the same.

The wide range of new services offered through the partnership includes family therapy, which is critical in an individual’s recovery. By educating the family, the individual has a better chance of creating a strong support system that understands the intensity of the disease.

Guests at the event were given blue and green “awareness ribbons” to wear, representing each of the organizations. In addition, attendees were provided with informational packets consisting of program information and resources that Turning Point at CarePlus provides.

For more information on the new programs being offered visit http://www.careplusnj.org/substance-abuse-programs/.

Care Plus NJ, Inc. (http://www.CarePlusNJ.org ) is a northern New Jersey provider of recovery-focused mental health, primary care, substance abuse, and family services that addresses the unique needs of individuals with a holistic approach to recovery and overall wellness. Operating out of 23 sites – including three outpatient centers located in Paramus, Fair Lawn, and Montclair, ten residential facilities, offices at three local hospitals, and seven community offices – their services are convenient to clients located throughout Northern New Jersey. They also provide educational programs on mental health-related topics to schools, organizations, and community groups; training topics including certified Mental Health First Aid, Suicide Prevention, Bullying Prevention and Crisis Planning and Intervention Strategies for Schools.

For nearly 40 years, Turning Point, Inc. (http://www.TurningPointNJ.org) has provided compassionate treatment in a clinically rich treatment environment. Turning Point offers a full continuum of residential (detox, short-term residential treatment and halfway house for women) and outpatient addiction treatment programs throughout northern New Jersey (Paterson, Verona, Paramus). Over 3,000 men and women struggling with addiction receive treatment in Turning Point programs every year.







Lox to be Dean of the SIUE School of Education, Health & Human Behavior

Edwardsville, Ill. (PRWEB) March 20, 2015

Curt Lox, PhD, has been recommended as the new dean of the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior. Lox has served as interim dean since May 2014, and his permanent appointment is contingent upon SIU Board of Trustees approval.

Lox brings more than 20 years of academic experience with 19 of those at SIUE. The Orange County, Calif., native joined the School’s faculty in 1996. He served as associate dean from 2003-09 and as chairperson in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education from 2009-14.

“Dr. Lox’s experience and leadership at SIUE have prepared him well for this leadership role,” said Parviz Ansari, SIUE provost and vice chancellor for Academic Affairs. “Dr. Lox is highly prepared for the challenge of facing a difficult fiscal environment with a positive approach to problem solving. With a clear commitment to academic excellence, his vision for the School will lead to a bright future.”

Lox’s research has been focused on the psychological impact of exercise for special populations, including the elderly, overweight and obese children and adults, and individuals infected with HIV. His research articles have been published in the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Journal of Cognitive Rehabilitation, International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Journal of Health Psychology, and Rehabilitation Psychology among others. He is the co-author of The Psychology of Exercise: Integrating Theory and Practice, which is currently at press in its fourth edition.

“I want to thank Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe and Provost Ansari for the opportunity to serve this University and this School,” Lox said. “We have a wide range of programs with increasing recognition for our work – education, health sciences and human behavior. We have a strong tradition of preparing our students to serve the region as exceptional educators and administrators, speech pathologists or audiologists, or to work in exercise science, health education or psychology.

“Regardless of the field, we will work passionately to advance that reputation. It is certainly one of my goals to continue to promote the many accomplishments of our faculty, staff and students.”

Lox earned a doctorate in kinesiology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and his master’s from Miami (Ohio) University. He has worked as a sport psychology consultant with players and coaches at the interscholastic, intercollegiate and professional levels for more than 20 years. Lox currently serves as the sport psychologist for SIUE Intercollegiate Athletics and the United States Martial Arts Team.

Lox replaces Dr. Bette Bergeron, who resigned to assume duties as provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at Southern Connecticut State University.

The SIUE School of Education, Health and Human Behavior prepares students in a wide range of fields including community health education, exercise science, instructional technology, psychology, speech-language pathology and audiology, administration and teaching. Faculty members engage in leading-edge research, which enhances teaching and enriches the educational experience. The School supports the community through on-campus clinics, outreach to children and families, and a focused commitment to enhancing individual lives across the region.

-SIUE-

Photo: Dr. Curt Lox, dean of the SIUE School of Education, Health and Human Behavior.