Tag Archives: from

gI_0_cleftgraphic2

Topamax Birth Injury Resources and the Wall Street Journal Report on Growing Concern over Potential Birth Defects from Topamax


(PRWEB) March 30, 2011

On March 29, 2011 the Wall Street Journal covered the growing concern surrounding birth defects related to drugs taken by women during pregnancy (Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt the Baby, March 29, 2011, Wall Street Journal). The article was spurred by the fact that in early March, the FDA released a MedAlert Safety Update regarding the pregnancy category classification of the popular migraine drug Topamax (also known as Topiragen or topiramate). (Topamax (topiramate): Label Change – Risk For Development of Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate in Newborns, March 4, 2011, FDA.gov).

In February of 2011, the FDA also announced that certain antipsychotic drugs including Haldol, Zyprexa, Seroquel and Abilify, among others, could cause withdrawal symptoms such as agitation and difficulty breathing and feeding in newborns if the baby is exposed to any of these drugs en utero. (Antipsychotic Drugs Used During Pregnancy Could Harm Newborn, FDA.gov).

As the WSJ notes, some of the first conclusive evidence that a drug could cross the placenta and cause potential harm to a fetus occurred in the 1960’s when over 10,000 babies were born with missing or shrunken limbs after their mothers took thalidomide, a morning-sickness drug and sleep aid. (Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt the Baby, March 29, 2011, Wall Street Journal)

The recent Topamax announcement surrounds reports by the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry suggesting that oral deformities such as cleft lip and cleft palate may be linked to the use of Topamax during pregnancy. Specifically, the NAAED cites that the existence of major malformations was 3.8% in the topiramate-exposed group of infants versus 1.3% in the unexposed reference group. The prevalence of cleft lip was 0.69% versus the expected rate of .07% in the normal population. (Herndandez-Diaz, S., Mittendorf, R., Holmes L.B. Comparative Safety of Topiramate During Pregnancy. Birth Defects Research (Part A); 88:408 (2010).)

The NAAED Pregnancy Registry was established in 1997 by Massachusetts General Hospital to study the safety of anticonvulsant drugs taken during pregnancy.

The FDA has encouraged the creation of such pregnancy registries as a responsible way to study and report on birth defects from anticonvulsants and other medication. Some of the difficulties in understanding birth defects from drugs such as Topamax lie in the fact that it is not considered ethical to include pregnant women or unborn children in clinical drug trials.

As a result, the labels on a large number of medications have next to no information about the potential harm they may cause to a mother or a fetus. A label may advise a women to seek the consult of her doctor, however, many of these physicians are often baffled since conclusive data on safety in pregnancy does not exist for so many prescription drugs.(Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt the Baby, March 29, 2011, Wall Street Journal)

However, despite the fact that drugs are not tested on pregnant women, millions of these women take medications each year. The WSJ article reports that as many as 60% of women take at least one prescription drug during their pregnancy, and on average, women use three to five. (Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt the Baby, March 29, 2011, Wall Street Journal)

The birth defects allegedly linked to Topamax – cleft palate and cleft lip, are known as oral-facial clefts. The severity of potential cleft palate from Topamax ranges from a small gap in the lip to a gaping hole in the roof of the mouth. Cleft palate can affect the hard or soft palates of the mouth and often require numerous surgeries to repair the condition. Children with cleft palate often require special feeding bottles or tubes to get proper nutrition and may be outfitted with an artificial palate prior to surgery. These children are especially prone to chronic ear infections as excess fluid from the mouth drains into the ear canal.

Oral-facial clefts such as cleft palate occur very early in the stages of fetal development. The tissues which will become the lip fuse around 5 – 6 weeks of development, where the palate forms around 7 weeks.

Many of the concerns about the birth defects of Topamax and other anticonvulsant drugs is the fact that the alleged birth defects occur during this early stage of fetal development. During this time many women are not even aware that they are pregnant yet and they may unwittingly be taking the drug without knowing the potential damage it could be causing.

Women or families seeking more information about the alleged birth risks of Topamax are encouraged to visit the online resource of TopamaxBirthInjury.com. Topamax Birth Injury Resources offers a free, no-obligation claim review form which families can submit to a qualified Topamax attorney to review their injuries for a potential Topamax lawsuit.

###







gI_61935_RxBirthDefects_baby1

Following Wall Street Journal Report on Birth Injury From Prescription Medications, RX Birth Defects Releases New Resources for Alleged Victims of Topamax


(Vocus/PRWEB) April 12, 2011

On March 29, 2011 the Wall Street Journal covered the growing concern surrounding birth defects related to prescription medications taken by women during pregnancy. The article, entitiled “Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt The Baby?” examines the history of drug approval in the United States, as well as the lack of appropriate measures to determine dangers to pregnant women and unborn children (Can Mom’s Medicine Hurt the Baby, March 29, 2011, Wall Street Journal).

The article was spurred by the fact that in March of 2011, the FDA released a new MedAlert Safety Update regarding the pregnancy category classification of the popular migraine drug Topamax (also known as Topiragen or topiramate). (Topamax (topiramate): Label Change – Risk For Development of Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate in Newborns, March 4, 2011, fda.gov). This alert followed a troubling February 2011 annoucement that certain antipsychotic drugs including Haldol, Zyprexa, Seroquel and Abilify, could cause significant withdrawal symptoms after birth if a child is exposed en uteri. (Antipsychotic Drugs Used During Pregnancy Could Harm Newborn, February 2011, fda.gov).

A drug classification change for Topamax means that the drug is now placed in a drug category that indicates “there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans”. (Chart of FDA Pregnancy Categories, fda.gov) The FDA strongly advises that all other options be explored before a woman uses a category D drug during pregnancy and that the drug only be used if the risk to the mother outweighs the potential risk to the fetus.

The specific Topamax re-classification was encouraged by evidence presented by the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry suggesting that oral-facial deformities such as cleft lip and cleft palate may be linked to the use of Topamax during pregnancy. Specifically, the NAAED cites that the existence of major malformations was 3.8% in the topiramate-exposed group of infants versus 1.3% in the unexposed reference group. The prevalence of cleft lip was 0.69% versus the expected rate of .07% in the normal population. (Source: Herndandez-Diaz, S., Mittendorf, R., Holmes L.B. Comparative Safety of Topiramate During Pregnancy. Birth Defects Research (Part A); 88:408 (2010).)

Topamax is part of a class of drugs known as “anticonvulsants” or “anti-epileptics”, a class of drugs at the center of the birth defect debate. Numerous other anticonvulsant drugs, including the epileptic and seizure medication Depakote, have been linked to potential birth defects. Depakote, specifically, has been linked to serious neural tube malformations that cause the debilitating condition of spina bifida (Source: The Teratogenicity of Anticonvulsant Drugs, Lewis B. Holmes, M.D., N Engl J Med 2001; 344:1132-1138, April 12, 2001).

Currently, no comprehensive testing of potential drug risks for pregnant or breastfeeding women or unborn children exists. The ethical issues surrounding testing on these demographic groups prevents organized studies for this population. As a result, many of the birth defects that may be related to prescription drugs are not discovered until after the drug is released to the public and physicians or drug registry programs begin reporting a pattern of birth injuries.

RXBirthDefects.com is part of the family of resource websites created by the Consumer Justice Foundation, an online consumer watchdog agency. Following the Wall Street Journal article and the FDA classification change for Topamax, RXBirthDefects.com added a resource section dedicated to providing information about potential birth defects related to Topamax use during pregnancy.

The Topamax birth defect information covered on RXBirthDefects.com includes detailed information about the oral-facial malformations and genital malformations that may be related to the drug use. This includes facial clefts such as cleft lip, cleft palate and the male genital deformation of hypospadias (Source: Herndandez-Diaz, S., Mittendorf, R., Holmes L.B. Comparative Safety of Topiramate During Pregnancy. Birth Defects Research (Part A); 88:408 (2010)).

Families seeking legal recourse for birth injuries related to Topamax taken during pregnancy can find more information about how to file a Topamax lawsuit and updated news on the status of ongoing Topamax litigation in the United States. Families can connect immediately with reputable Topamax attorneys and legal representation via the free case evaluation form available online at RXBirthDefects.com.

About RXBirthDefects.com:

RXBirthDefects.com provides comprehensive information and resources regarding the use of prescription medication during pregnancy. The information on RXBirthDefects.com currently covers the prescription anticonvulsants Topamax, Dilantin, Depakote and Tegretol as well as the common antidepressants Celexa, Lexapro, Paxil, Pristiq, Prozac and Zoloft. The website provides an online resource center and free claim review form for women and families seeking more information about the specific birth defects that may be related to these drugs when used during pregnancy.

# # #







gI_45814_Health-1113

Avoiding Addiction When Powerful Opioid Painkillers Are Needed, From the November 2013 Harvard Health Letter


Boston, MA (PRWEB) November 12, 2013

Sometimes the best way to ease pain is with the type of prescription painkiller known as an opioid. Despite their “addictive” reputation in the media, the majority of people use opioids safely and without addition, reports the November 2013 Harvard Health Letter.

Opioids are a class of painkillers with high addictive potential. They include oxycodone (OxyContin), hydrocodone (Vicodin), hydromorphone (Dilaudid), and meperidine (Demerol). Opioids are typically used for the short term, such as for treating severe pain following surgery. They are also sometimes used long-term for relieving pain related to cancer or a terminal illness.

For minor surgical pain or injuries, it’s best to limit the use of an opioid to no more than seven days. Using one for more than 30 days leads to dependence. That means a person begins to suffer withdrawal symptoms if he or she abruptly stops taking the medication. With long-term use, some individuals need more of these drugs to achieve the same effect. Keep in mind that dependence is not the same as addiction, which is characterized by compulsive use and preoccupation with the drug that interferes with normal life.

For long-term use, take opioids by the clock as prescribed, advises Dr. Karsten Kueppenbender, an addiction psychiatrist at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital. Trying to reduce addiction risk by cutting back on the medication and waiting until the pain gets really bad isn’t a good strategy, and can actually backfire. The memory of how bad the pain got, and the sense of relief from the opioid, could actually increase the risk of becoming addicted.

The key to avoiding addiction is the assistance of a medical team that’s easily accessible, along with regular checkups to reassess the need for—and use of—the drug.

Read the full-length article: “Caution: These are the most addictive pain meds”.

Also in the November 2013 issue of the Harvard Health Letter:

    Steps for coping with mild cognitive impairment
    The best fruits and veggies for fall
    An anti-falling checklist to take stock of trip hazards in the home

The Harvard Health Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $ 16 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/health or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).







The Jennifer Act Bill in Florida Will Help Save Addicts from Fatal Overdose, and Allow the State to Collect Data on Long Term Drug Treatment

USA (PRWEB) March 24, 2015

In response to the overdose death of her 29 year old daughter, grieving mother Sharon Blair has dedicated the last six years of her life to pass the Jennifer Act in Florida. The bill proposes to give family members the ability to impose state sanctified interventions for persons who are unable to take necessary action to protect their own self interests (compromised by addiction). TBN Weekly reports (March 18th) the Jennifer Act is presently Senate Bill 1340 and House Bill 1017. The act would allow addicts to remain in intensive care for a minimum of 14 days (completing a full detox cycle) as opposed to Florida’s insufficient Marchaman Act, which addresses addiction by observing drug addicts for three days (most do not complete a full detox cycle). Harbor Village Detox is a specialized inpatient medical detox center in South Florida, and supports the Jennifer Act’s attempt to lessen rates of drug overdose and provide immediate assistance to those in desperate need of addiction treatment.

A Harbor Village Detox associate supports the bill’s passing and comments, “[The Jennifer Act] proposal is something the state of Florida has needed for a long time. There’s no way for parents to get help for their children who refuse to get treatment themselves. This bill is an important step in preventing overdose deaths in families, where addiction is known. Blair’s case is particularly tragic, wherein she could not force a court to grant Jennifer into rehab. There’s no reason why any mother, father, sibling, or loved one should have to watch their loved one deteriorate from an untreated disease- because that’s exactly what addiction is. It’s like letting someone bleed out on the street. The Jennifer Act will help us stop the egregious rate of preventable deaths.”

The inpatient medical detox center, Harbor Village Detox, is dedicated to providing the apex in effective addiction treatment. The facility offers patients a spa-like environment to go through the typically painful withdrawal process; their instrumental, JACHO accredited, medical staff remains with patients 24/7 to ensure patients benefit from continual medical and emotional support. Unlike most detox treatment center, Harbor Village Detox offers group and intensive therapy to begin unraveling the chords of addiction.

For more information on the inpatient medical detox facility, Harbor VIllage Detox, visit http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call Harbor Village Detox directly 1-855-290-4261.







gI_137415_Mental-Health5

Teen Writing Contest About Mental Health Issues Gets Support From Published Authors Donating Autographed Books Reports StageofLife.com


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) March 27, 2014

Online writing community, StageofLife.com, announced today that eleven, internationally published authors will be donating an autographed copy of their book as part of the winning prize packages for the teen finalists of the website’s “March Madness” writing contest dealing with mental health issues.

As an educational resource, StageofLife.com’s mission is to change the world through storytelling, and its award-winning, blogging platform welcomes close to a million teens, college students, teachers, and parents each year who come to the site to read and share their personal, real-life stories.

The site often collaborates with authors based on the topics of its writing prompts.

“We are overwhelmed at the support by the professional writing community as they donate autographed copies of their books for this month’s writing contest on mental illness and health,” said Rebecca Thiegs, VP of Education StageofLife.com.

Participating authors who are donating a signed copy of their book on mental health as a prize to the winning “March Madness” contest finalists include:

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness” (Simon & Schuster)

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life” (Mariner Books)

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope” (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers)

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life” (Avery Trade)

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself” (W.W. Norton & Company)

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness” (Hyperion)

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope” (iUniverse)

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder” and “Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia” (Goodman Beck Publishing)

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” (Scribner)

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia” (St. Martin’s Griffin)

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” (Thomas Dunne Books)

When asked about her participation with Stage of Life writing contest, author Stacy Pershall said, “Every time you come out to one person as having a mental health disorder, you change the world. Eliminating stigma happens one person at a time. Just giving someone the vocabulary to address what’s happening to them — for example anorexia, bulimia, self-harm — is a powerful thing…Before I got the right treatment, I was certain I’d die by suicide; it was just a matter of time. Now it’s not all about me. I have to stay alive so I can keep other people alive. Killing myself has ceased to be an option.”

Thiegs added that “People don’t talk about mental health issues or mental illness because of the shame and brokenness surrounding the topic, so this month, while much of the world watches the March Madness college basketball tournament, we want to encourage people to think, write and share a story surrounding the topic of mental health and mental illness.”

Alongside its “March Madness” writing contest, StageofLife.com features educational videos, recommended TED talks, resource reading on mental illness, and a Twitter contest awareness component.

Melody Moezzi, author of “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” told StageofLife.com that, “Sharing our stories as people living with mental illness is by far the most powerful way to fight stigma and discrimination. It’s our best weapon against the insidious culture of shame and silence that surrounds mental illness today.”

The StageofLife.com essay contest is open to anyone aged 13 years and older. Stories must be original, non-fiction, and 500 words or less. There is no entry fee and submissions are due March 31, 2014 by midnight Pacific Time US.

In addition to receiving a signed book, the 1st Place student writer will also receive gift cards from literacy sponsors IHOP and Papa John’s while the 1st Place adult writer will receive gift cards from Applebee’s and SpaWeek.

Finalists and Winners will be posted on the essay winner’s page and Teen Trend Report after April 20th, 2014.

To get details and submit a story to the March Madness writing contest, visit http://www.StageofLife.com.







gI_148803_dr-yee-photo

Rapid Opiate Detox in Only 8 Hours from Las Vegas Rapid Detox


Las Vegas, NV (PRWEB) June 20, 2014

Opiate detox can be an extremely painful thing to go thorugh. However, with Las Vegas Rapid Detox’s groundbreaking 8 hour rapid detox procedure, patients can detox from opiates in only eight hours without suffering any signs of withdrawal. Las Vegas Rapid Detox’s procedure has been proven safe and in Las Vegas Rapid Detox is please to announce that they have reached the milestone of successfully performing 500 rapid opiate detox procedures without any complications.

Since July 2007, Dr. Thomas Yee, MD, an anesthesiologist with 20 years of clinical experience, certified by the American Board of Anesthesiology, has treated 500 patients from all over the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom, and Mexico. Performed in certified operating rooms at accredited hospital or surgery centers, the advanced rapid opiate detox procedure (AROD), developed by Dr. Yee, has been used on patients addicted to various opiates including heroin, oxycontin, oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, dilaudid, vicodin, tramadol, etc.

“The best way to describe what we do is imagining 2 weeks worth of cold-turkey quitting being compressed into 8 hours while the patient sleeps under anesthesia,” Dr. Yee stated. “We know the physical withdrawal in quitting opiates is horrible, but the discomfort is finite; it does not last forever. The trick is to hurry up the withdrawal so the patient can get over it while sleeping.”

After the 8-hour treatment, the patients would receive 48 hours of one-on-one nursing care for recovery. After returning home, patients are required to have weekly counseling for 6 months to treat the psychological aspect of addiction. In order to prevent relapse, patients are also required to receive FDA-approved monthly injection of a long-acting opiate-blocker, Vivitrol, from nearby providers.

To find out more about how Las Vegas Rapid Detox Medical Clinic reached the 500 patient mark without complication, go to http://www.saferapiddetox.com or http://www.rapiddetoxlasvegas.com.







gI_139381_Mental-Health-Writing-Contest4

86% of Teenagers Know Someone Who Suffers from a Mental Illness, Reports Stageoflife.com


York, PA (PRWEB) April 30, 2014

To understand the relationship between teens and mental illness, StageofLife.com asked thousands of high school and college students to take its national poll about mental health issues as part of its monthly writing contests and life surveys.

The results revealed the following statistics about teenagers and mental illness:

–1 out of 2 teens state they have personally struggled with mental illness at some point in their lives.

–Depression and Anxiety ranked #1 and #2 respectively as the most common mental illness suffered by students.

–86% of teenagers say they know someone who suffers from a mental illness.

–46% of students say they have “contemplated” suicide.

–86.5% of students say that mental health issues are an “important” or “very important” topic for the country.

–84.5% of teens think that there is a negative stigma surrounding those with mental illness.

–Half of all teens say classmates and friends are mostly compassionate about those with mental illness.

–73% of high school and college students know someone who is taking medication because of a mental health issue.

Over 5,100 students visited the essay and survey page during the mental health writing prompt and over 400 teens fully answered the poll. An additional 180+ teen bloggers submitted an essay to StageofLife.com sharing their personal story will mental illness.

The winning 1st place student essay, “Fibs and Femurs for Dinner” was written by Emily Bromberg, a junior attending Long Beach High School on Long Island, NY who shared her story of struggling to stay healthy. The winning 1st place non-student essay was submitted by special education teacher, Lauren Bauer from Raleigh, NC in her story, “Alone.”

Stage of Life selected a winner from its “Short Short Story” Twitter contest, which also tied into the mental illness writing prompt. The winning Tweet came from ‏‏@sopxhia who wrote, “Depression is being trapped in my labyrinth of thoughts and having no light to guide my way through the twists of the maze.”

Winners from the writing and Twitter contests received gift cards from StageofLife.com educational corporate sponsors Applebee’s, IHOP, Papa John’s, and SpaWeek.com.

Additionally, the top 12 essay finalists received an autographed copy of a book signed by a nationally published author.

The participating authors who donated a signed book as a prize for the Stage of Life writing contest included…

–Susannah Cahalan – “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness”

–Marya Hornbacher – “Madness: A Bipolar Life”

–Randye Kaye – “Ben Behind His Voices: One Family’s Journey from the Chaos of Schizophrenia to Hope”

–Melody Moezzi – “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life”

–Stacy Pershall – “Loud in the House of Myself”

–Elyn Saks – “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness”

–Lizabeth D. Schuch – “More Than Bipolar: A Memoir of Acceptance and Hope”

–Karen Winters Schwartz – “Where Are the Cocoa Puffs? A Family’s Journey through Bipolar Disorder and Reis’s Pieces – Love, Loss, and Schizophrenia”

–Andrew Solomon – “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression”

–Pamela Spiro Wagner – “Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia”

–Fletcher Wortmann – “Triggered: A Memoir of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder”

StageofLife.com VP of Education, Rebecca Thiegs, said, “We gave students a safe venue to share their stories about mental illness. It is often a taboo topic, and we’re proud of the bravery of the hundreds of participating teens who submitted an essay this month.”

To read all of the essays about mental illness and download the full teen statistics report on this and other monthly writing contests and teen trends, visit StageofLife.com.

# # #

StageofLife.com is a privately funded, start-up company founded in 2009 by Joe and Eric Thiegs. The website’s mission is to change the world, one story at a time. The site welcomed its 1,000,000th visitor last year and provides an international writing community, resources, videos, statistics, and more for today’s teen, Gen X, Gen Y, and Baby Boomer generations.







Don’t let a blood clot spoil your travel plans, from the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch

Boston, MA (PRWEB) March 20, 2015

Blood clots can develop in the legs during hours of sitting in a plane, train, or automobile, a condition called deep-vein thrombosis (DVT). These clots can be painful, and even deadly, reports the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

If a blood clot grows in a leg vein, it can interfere with circulation in the leg, causing pain and swelling. Sometimes a small piece of the clot breaks off and travels to another part of the body — this tiny traveler is known as an embolus. A pulmonary embolus — a clot that lodges in the lungs — can block the flow of oxygen to the body, leading to fatigue, breathlessness, chest pain, and even death. Approximately 300,000 people die from pulmonary embolism in the United States every year.

“It usually takes more than a single factor for DVT to develop,” says Dr. Julianne Stoughton, a vascular surgeon at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Age is one factor; the chance of developing a blood clot begins to increase after age 40 and continues to rise throughout life. Inactivity imposed by travel is another. Taking a medication that promotes blood clotting, as well as conditions like factor V Leiden mutation, cancer, and heart disease, also increase the risk.

Several preventive measures can reduce the risk of developing a blood clot when you’re on the road or in the air:

Wear compression stockings. These aren’t the thick, rubbery, beige hose of yesteryear. Compression stockings are now virtually indistinguishable from opaque hose and come in a variety of colors. Made from an elastic material, they exert more pressure at the ankle than at the calf. This helps send blood back up through the veins to the heart.

Move around. Take a break every hour. When on a plane, bus, or train, walk the aisles; when driving, stop at a rest area. While seated, practice tracing the letters of the alphabet in the air with one foot, then the other, using the big toe as a “pen point.”

Stay awake. Don’t take a sleeping pill. A long nap in a seated position lets blood pool in the legs.

Keep hydrated. Drink plenty of water. Avoid alcohol, which is dehydrating. Staying hydrated may mean more bathroom visits, but getting up and walking down the aisle keeps blood circulating.

Wear loose clothing. It’s less likely to restrict blood flow.

Ask a doctor about taking low-dose aspirin. There is some evidence that a taking a baby aspirin before a trip can prevent blood clots.

Read the full-length article: “Healthy travel: Don’t let this common hazard spoil your best-laid plans”

Also in the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch:

    Breast cancer isn’t as deadly for older women
    How core exercises can help neck pain
    What you may not know about pelvic organ prolapse
    How music improves memory and mood

Harvard Women’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $ 20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/womens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

XXX

Media: Contact Kristen Rapoza at hhpmedia(AT)hms.harvard.edu for a complimentary copy of the newsletter, or to receive our press releases directly.







gI_60010_Choices_recovery_alex_fioroni

Per Wickstrom Interviews Chef Alex Fioroni on Recovery from Addiction through Proper Nutrition at 2015 Oscars Roll-Out


Hollywood, California (PRWEB) March 20, 2015

On Februrary 21st, 2015, Per Wickstrom, the founder of Choices Recovery, sponsored Durkin Entertainment’s EcoLuxe Lounge, a gathering of several of the world’s premier providers of eco-friendly and socially conscious products and services, and the “Salute to the Oscars” pre-award party honoring the 2015 Oscar nominees. Held in the Stardust Penthouse on the rooftop of the luxurious Beverly Hilton Hotel, the EcoLuxe Lounge saw many Hollywood notables in attendance to enjoy the rustic American décor overlooking the impressive Los Angeles skyline and to learn more about the ecologically sound, natural and holistic goods and services featured there.

“We were honored to have a place at the EcoLuxe Lounge,” Per Wickstrom commented after the event. “It gave us a chance to get the word out about what the program at Choices Recovery has to offer, which is holistic options in the treatment of substance abuse.”

One of the providers featured at the EcoLuxe Lounge was Certified Nutrition Specialist and Chef Alex Fioroni, who was there as a guest showcasing some of his wonderful food, like his “Mini-Meal Bars”, delicious and nutritionally balanced snacks perfect for people on the go. Per Wickstrom had the opportunity to speak with Chef Fioroni about the importance of proper nutrition and a balanced diet in the treatment of substance abuse. “You are working from the inside out (with nutritional therapy),” says Alex, “and in the psychological part, you are working from the outside in. The two together are incredible.”

Choices Recovery – A South Bend Rehab at the 2015 Oscar’s

Choices Recovery, a holistic treatment center for drug abuse and addiction, places great emphasis on the physical wellbeing of those that come to their rehabilitation facility seeking help with overcoming their addiction. “The first phase of the program is nutrition and physical fitness,” says Per, “because if you don’t get those two right, how are you going to confront someone’s underlying issues when they feel miserable and they can’t sleep?”

Other products and service providers at the EcoLuxe Lounge included: with a styling bar, organic spray tans and makeup touchups from OC Hair & Makeup, glamping vacations to Yellowstone, Glacier Park and The Moan Desert from Under Canvas, CanaDog Supply pet items, and much more.

For more information please visit http://www.perwickstrom.com.







gI_98024_IBISWorld-Logo-2500x900

Toxicology Laboratories in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld Has Been Updated


New York, NY (PRWEB) March 19, 2015

Revenue for the Toxicology Laboratories industry is expected to rise at an average annual rate of 5.6% to $ 2.7 billion in the five years to 2015. Rising demand for drug tests from employers has also resulted in profit growth for the industry. Toxicology laboratories test blood, urine or saliva for the presence of drugs or chemicals. In emergency situations, hospitals may administer toxicology tests to determine if patients are exhibiting symptoms related to a drug overdose. Moreover, employers may require that employees receive routine drug tests to ensure that drugs are not used in the workplace. In 2011, according to the latest data available from the Society for Human Resource Management, 57.0% of businesses in the United States required employees to take drug tests, stimulating industry revenue.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 24.6 million Americans aged 12 and older, or 9.4%, used illicit drugs in the month prior to the survey, up from 8.9% in 2010. Overall, higher illicit drug use has spurred employers’ demand for toxicology tests. According to the latest data available from the US Department of Justice, the economic cost of illicit drug use, measured by crime, health and productivity costs, is $ 193.0 billion each year. According to IBISWorld Industry Analyst Sarah Turk, “To mitigate productivity losses from illicit drug use, some employers have relied on drug tests to screen potential employees and to bolster health outcomes with their employee assistance program.”

Over the five years to 2020, industry revenue is forecast to increase at an annualized rate of 4.7% to $ 3.4 billion. “A rising incarceration rate may be indicative of more drug-related crimes, which will increase demand for toxicology tests from the law enforcement sector,” says Turk. According to data from Quest Diagnostics, the percentage of Americans who had positive drug tests rose in 2014 for the first time in more than a decade, and may continue an upward trend over the next five years.

For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Toxicology Laboratories in the US industry report page.

Follow IBISWorld on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/IBISWorld

Friend IBISWorld on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/IBISWorld/121347533189

IBISWorld industry Report Key Topics

This industry receives and independently analyzes samples of biological material for various toxins, primarily drugs. Services include blood testing, saliva testing and urine testing. Employers, the medical community and law enforcement are major purchasers of this industry’s services.

Industry Performance

Executive Summary

Key External Drivers

Current Performance

Industry Outlook

Industry Life Cycle

Products & Markets

Supply Chain

Products & Services

Major Markets

Globalization & Trade

Business Locations

Competitive Landscape

Market Share Concentration

Key Success Factors

Cost Structure Benchmarks

Barriers to Entry

Major Companies

Operating Conditions

Capital Intensity

Key Statistics

Industry Data

Annual Change

Key Ratios

About IBISWorld Inc.

Recognized as the nation’s most trusted independent source of industry and market research, IBISWorld offers a comprehensive database of unique information and analysis on every US industry. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, the company equips clients with the insight necessary to make better business decisions. Headquartered in Los Angeles, IBISWorld serves a range of business, professional service and government organizations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com or call 1-800-330-3772.