Tag Archives: Education

Narconon Supports Drug Prevention Month with New Compilation of Education Resources


(PRWEB) October 13, 2014

In honor of National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, Narconon has compiled a rich array of resources to help parents and teachers keep young people safe and sober. In one location, a teacher can learn about the Narconon drug prevention curriculum and its results, a parent can find simple and detailed guides to help them cover this subject with their children, and young people can find more than a dozen educational videos to fill gaps in their drug knowledge. What makes it even better is that most of these resources are available free of charge.

By visiting http://www.narconon.org/drug-prevention/national-prevention-month.html anyone can find information, booklets and videos to help them in the job of substance abuse prevention. The resources include:

    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Prescription Drug Abuse – a fast guide to bring parents up to speed
    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Marijuana – an update on how this drug has changed and why it is more dangerous than ever
    Eighteen videos for young people, quickly explaining the basics on why people use drugs, the long term effects of weed and the effects of methamphetamine, alcohol and opiates and other drugs
    Complete coverage of the health risks of all the major categories of drugs
    And much more.

“Parents, teachers and young people all deserve to know all they can about drugs and the harm that can result,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “They need this information to make the choice to stay sober. The pressure on a young person to use drugs or drink can be subtle but also pervasive. It requires certainty about the downside of drug use for a person to elect to stay sober when those around them are getting high. That’s why we offer this information, free whenever possible.”

In addition to offering this information to the public, Narconon staff and volunteers around the world have been providing drug prevention classes to schools and other groups since the late 1960s. The first drug educator was Narconon’s founder, William Benitez, formerly an inmate in the Arizona State Prison system. After he recovered from his addiction, he began teaching at schools in Arizona to prevent others from going down the same path. This tradition continues today in Narconon centers in the US, Russia, Taiwan, Italy and other countries.

For more information on the Narconon drug prevention curriculum or the Narconon drug rehabilitation program, call 1-800-775-8750.







Narconon Drug Education Receives Positive Response to Prevention Month Activities


(PRWEB) October 23, 2014

Narconon centers around the world are known for their activities to teach young people about the dangers of drug abuse, but when October and National Substance Abuse Prevention Month roll around, outreach efforts in the U.S. increase even more. In Louisiana, the staff at Narconon New Life Retreat set up a booth at the Livingston Parish street fair to hand out drug education materials. They also invited kids from the community to sign a drug-free pledge. Approximately 300 children accepted, signing their names to a large placard in the booth. Booklets detailing the problems associated with drug use and educational DVDs were also handed out to teachers and parents.

In Southern California, a very active drug prevention schedule runs all year round, but for this special month, this schedule was increased. By the third week of the month, the team was on target to reach 10,000 children.

“The welcome our drug prevention specialists received was enthusiastic in both these locations,” said Clark Carr, the president of Narconon International. “At the street fair, our staff were visited by political candidates, a local pastor and the leader of a youth group. In Southern California, our drug education specialists are invited back again and again. Many people realize how serious the drug problem is and appreciate our efforts to get young people to commit to a drug-free life.”

Across Southern California, staff from Narconon Fresh Start visited schools to deliver modules from the Narconon drug prevention curriculum. The feedback surveys from the youth provided evidence that the message was getting through.

“We tabulate the results of every feedback survey we receive,” said Tony Bylsma, the director of drug education for Narconon Fresh Start. “Eighty percent of our students say they have learned new information about drugs and about half say that this information changed the way they think about drug use. Nearly all of them feel they can put this information to good use, either for themselves or their friends.”

“The welcome we receive from youth and community members is proof that our drug prevention outreach is vitally important,” said Carr. “Helping young people grow up sober and successful is one of our biggest motivations across our network of rehabilitation and prevention centers.”

Around the world, there are more than 100 Narconon rehab and education centers. The Narconon rehab program is a long-term residential program founded by William Benitez, that utilizes the humanitarian works of American author L. Ron Hubbard in its recovery steps. For more information on the drug rehab program of Narconon or the drug prevention curriculum, call 1-800-775-8750.







Narconon Supports Drug Prevention Month with New Compilation of Education Resources


(PRWEB) October 13, 2014

In honor of National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, Narconon has compiled a rich array of resources to help parents and teachers keep young people safe and sober. In one location, a teacher can learn about the Narconon drug prevention curriculum and its results, a parent can find simple and detailed guides to help them cover this subject with their children, and young people can find more than a dozen educational videos to fill gaps in their drug knowledge. What makes it even better is that most of these resources are available free of charge.

By visiting http://www.narconon.org/drug-prevention/national-prevention-month.html anyone can find information, booklets and videos to help them in the job of substance abuse prevention. The resources include:

    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Prescription Drug Abuse – a fast guide to bring parents up to speed
    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Marijuana – an update on how this drug has changed and why it is more dangerous than ever
    Eighteen videos for young people, quickly explaining the basics on why people use drugs, the long term effects of weed and the effects of methamphetamine, alcohol and opiates and other drugs
    Complete coverage of the health risks of all the major categories of drugs
    And much more.

“Parents, teachers and young people all deserve to know all they can about drugs and the harm that can result,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “They need this information to make the choice to stay sober. The pressure on a young person to use drugs or drink can be subtle but also pervasive. It requires certainty about the downside of drug use for a person to elect to stay sober when those around them are getting high. That’s why we offer this information, free whenever possible.”

In addition to offering this information to the public, Narconon staff and volunteers around the world have been providing drug prevention classes to schools and other groups since the late 1960s. The first drug educator was Narconon’s founder, William Benitez, formerly an inmate in the Arizona State Prison system. After he recovered from his addiction, he began teaching at schools in Arizona to prevent others from going down the same path. This tradition continues today in Narconon centers in the US, Russia, Taiwan, Italy and other countries.

For more information on the Narconon drug prevention curriculum or the Narconon drug rehabilitation program, call 1-800-775-8750.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Narconon Supports Drug Prevention Month with New Compilation of Education Resources


(PRWEB) October 13, 2014

In honor of National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, Narconon has compiled a rich array of resources to help parents and teachers keep young people safe and sober. In one location, a teacher can learn about the Narconon drug prevention curriculum and its results, a parent can find simple and detailed guides to help them cover this subject with their children, and young people can find more than a dozen educational videos to fill gaps in their drug knowledge. What makes it even better is that most of these resources are available free of charge.

By visiting http://www.narconon.org/drug-prevention/national-prevention-month.html anyone can find information, booklets and videos to help them in the job of substance abuse prevention. The resources include:

    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Prescription Drug Abuse – a fast guide to bring parents up to speed
    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Marijuana – an update on how this drug has changed and why it is more dangerous than ever
    Eighteen videos for young people, quickly explaining the basics on why people use drugs, the long term effects of weed and the effects of methamphetamine, alcohol and opiates and other drugs
    Complete coverage of the health risks of all the major categories of drugs
    And much more.

“Parents, teachers and young people all deserve to know all they can about drugs and the harm that can result,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “They need this information to make the choice to stay sober. The pressure on a young person to use drugs or drink can be subtle but also pervasive. It requires certainty about the downside of drug use for a person to elect to stay sober when those around them are getting high. That’s why we offer this information, free whenever possible.”

In addition to offering this information to the public, Narconon staff and volunteers around the world have been providing drug prevention classes to schools and other groups since the late 1960s. The first drug educator was Narconon’s founder, William Benitez, formerly an inmate in the Arizona State Prison system. After he recovered from his addiction, he began teaching at schools in Arizona to prevent others from going down the same path. This tradition continues today in Narconon centers in the US, Russia, Taiwan, Italy and other countries.

For more information on the Narconon drug prevention curriculum or the Narconon drug rehabilitation program, call 1-800-775-8750.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Narconon Supports Drug Prevention Month with New Compilation of Education Resources


(PRWEB) October 13, 2014

In honor of National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, Narconon has compiled a rich array of resources to help parents and teachers keep young people safe and sober. In one location, a teacher can learn about the Narconon drug prevention curriculum and its results, a parent can find simple and detailed guides to help them cover this subject with their children, and young people can find more than a dozen educational videos to fill gaps in their drug knowledge. What makes it even better is that most of these resources are available free of charge.

By visiting http://www.narconon.org/drug-prevention/national-prevention-month.html anyone can find information, booklets and videos to help them in the job of substance abuse prevention. The resources include:

    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Prescription Drug Abuse – a fast guide to bring parents up to speed
    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Marijuana – an update on how this drug has changed and why it is more dangerous than ever
    Eighteen videos for young people, quickly explaining the basics on why people use drugs, the long term effects of weed and the effects of methamphetamine, alcohol and opiates and other drugs
    Complete coverage of the health risks of all the major categories of drugs
    And much more.

“Parents, teachers and young people all deserve to know all they can about drugs and the harm that can result,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “They need this information to make the choice to stay sober. The pressure on a young person to use drugs or drink can be subtle but also pervasive. It requires certainty about the downside of drug use for a person to elect to stay sober when those around them are getting high. That’s why we offer this information, free whenever possible.”

In addition to offering this information to the public, Narconon staff and volunteers around the world have been providing drug prevention classes to schools and other groups since the late 1960s. The first drug educator was Narconon’s founder, William Benitez, formerly an inmate in the Arizona State Prison system. After he recovered from his addiction, he began teaching at schools in Arizona to prevent others from going down the same path. This tradition continues today in Narconon centers in the US, Russia, Taiwan, Italy and other countries.

For more information on the Narconon drug prevention curriculum or the Narconon drug rehabilitation program, call 1-800-775-8750.







Narconon Supports Drug Prevention Month with New Compilation of Education Resources


(PRWEB) October 13, 2014

In honor of National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, Narconon has compiled a rich array of resources to help parents and teachers keep young people safe and sober. In one location, a teacher can learn about the Narconon drug prevention curriculum and its results, a parent can find simple and detailed guides to help them cover this subject with their children, and young people can find more than a dozen educational videos to fill gaps in their drug knowledge. What makes it even better is that most of these resources are available free of charge.

By visiting http://www.narconon.org/drug-prevention/national-prevention-month.html anyone can find information, booklets and videos to help them in the job of substance abuse prevention. The resources include:

    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Prescription Drug Abuse – a fast guide to bring parents up to speed
    10 Things Parents May Not Know about Marijuana – an update on how this drug has changed and why it is more dangerous than ever
    Eighteen videos for young people, quickly explaining the basics on why people use drugs, the long term effects of weed and the effects of methamphetamine, alcohol and opiates and other drugs
    Complete coverage of the health risks of all the major categories of drugs
    And much more.

“Parents, teachers and young people all deserve to know all they can about drugs and the harm that can result,” said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. “They need this information to make the choice to stay sober. The pressure on a young person to use drugs or drink can be subtle but also pervasive. It requires certainty about the downside of drug use for a person to elect to stay sober when those around them are getting high. That’s why we offer this information, free whenever possible.”

In addition to offering this information to the public, Narconon staff and volunteers around the world have been providing drug prevention classes to schools and other groups since the late 1960s. The first drug educator was Narconon’s founder, William Benitez, formerly an inmate in the Arizona State Prison system. After he recovered from his addiction, he began teaching at schools in Arizona to prevent others from going down the same path. This tradition continues today in Narconon centers in the US, Russia, Taiwan, Italy and other countries.

For more information on the Narconon drug prevention curriculum or the Narconon drug rehabilitation program, call 1-800-775-8750.







Narconon Drug Education Receives Positive Response to Prevention Month Activities


(PRWEB) October 23, 2014

Narconon centers around the world are known for their activities to teach young people about the dangers of drug abuse, but when October and National Substance Abuse Prevention Month roll around, outreach efforts in the U.S. increase even more. In Louisiana, the staff at Narconon New Life Retreat set up a booth at the Livingston Parish street fair to hand out drug education materials. They also invited kids from the community to sign a drug-free pledge. Approximately 300 children accepted, signing their names to a large placard in the booth. Booklets detailing the problems associated with drug use and educational DVDs were also handed out to teachers and parents.

In Southern California, a very active drug prevention schedule runs all year round, but for this special month, this schedule was increased. By the third week of the month, the team was on target to reach 10,000 children.

“The welcome our drug prevention specialists received was enthusiastic in both these locations,” said Clark Carr, the president of Narconon International. “At the street fair, our staff were visited by political candidates, a local pastor and the leader of a youth group. In Southern California, our drug education specialists are invited back again and again. Many people realize how serious the drug problem is and appreciate our efforts to get young people to commit to a drug-free life.”

Across Southern California, staff from Narconon Fresh Start visited schools to deliver modules from the Narconon drug prevention curriculum. The feedback surveys from the youth provided evidence that the message was getting through.

“We tabulate the results of every feedback survey we receive,” said Tony Bylsma, the director of drug education for Narconon Fresh Start. “Eighty percent of our students say they have learned new information about drugs and about half say that this information changed the way they think about drug use. Nearly all of them feel they can put this information to good use, either for themselves or their friends.”

“The welcome we receive from youth and community members is proof that our drug prevention outreach is vitally important,” said Carr. “Helping young people grow up sober and successful is one of our biggest motivations across our network of rehabilitation and prevention centers.”

Around the world, there are more than 100 Narconon rehab and education centers. The Narconon rehab program is a long-term residential program founded by William Benitez, that utilizes the humanitarian works of American author L. Ron Hubbard in its recovery steps. For more information on the drug rehab program of Narconon or the drug prevention curriculum, call 1-800-775-8750.







Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.