Tag Archives: Education

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Lyceum Books Announces New Publication on Supporting Student Veterans in Higher Education


Chicago, IL (PRWEB) April 10, 2015

Lyceum Books, Inc., publisher of professional development and educational resources for social work practitioners and educators, announces the publication of Supporting Veterans in Higher Education: A Primer for Administrators, Faculty, and Advisors. The book is edited by Jose E. Coll, United States Marine Corps veteran, director of the Office of Veteran Student Services, and associate professor of social work at Saint Leo University; and Eugenia L. Weiss, California-licensed clinical social worker, licensed psychologist, and clinical associate professor of social work at the University of Southern California.

Coll and Weiss describe this book as “ultimately about promoting social justice (and social action) in terms of combating the public and institutional ambivalence towards the veterans of today.”

This book provides insight into how administrative faculty and staff at institutions of higher education can help student veterans successfully transition from military to civilian life. It explores effective ways of advising student veterans, learning the behavioral health factors that affect academic success, building supportive communities. The authors offer effective strategies to aid colleges and universities in launching initiatives to address the needs of student veterans.

Patrick C. O’Rourke, Lt. Col. United States Army (ret.) and Director of Active Duty and Veteran Affairs at California State University states, “Supporting Veterans in Higher Education…responds to the functional needs of this growing field at the same time that it propels the discussion of veterans’ diversity in the academy. Books such as this transcend decades of silence regarding the effects of war on Americans who later enroll at our educational institutions… I know of no other veteran-related publication so wide-ranging in content and balanced in perspective.”

The authors discuss practices, policies, and programs that implement the Obama administration’s 8 Keys to Success; necessary partnerships such as Outside the Wire and Veterans Integration to Academic Leadership (VITAL), which outline collaborative initiatives between universities and community agencies and the Veterans’ Administration; and case studies that illustrate useful applications of the book’s content regarding veterans affairs.

For further information about this book including the table of contents and downloadable chapters for review, please click here.

Supporting Veterans in Higher Education: A Primer for Administrators, Faculty, and Advisors

Edited by Jose E. Coll and Eugenia L. Weiss

2015 paperback, 372 pages, ISBN 978-1-935871-64-4, $ 69.95

Available: Now

About the Editors:

Jose E. Coll (MSW, University of Central Florida; PhD, University of South Florida) is associate professor of social work and director of the Office of Veteran Student Services at Saint Leo University, where he oversees services and resources for over 7,400 student veterans annually. Coll has developed numerous programs to enhance student veteran success, such as transition courses for veterans and the development of the Veteran Student Emergency Fund, which provides assistance to student veterans in financial crisis while attending Saint Leo University. Professor Coll is a United States Marine Corps veteran and 2014–2015 American Council on Education (ACE) Fellow at the University of South Florida.

Eugenia L. Weiss (MSW, University of Southern California; PsyD, Alliant International University) is clinical associate professor of social work at the University of Southern California, where she is also co-coordinator of the military social work sub-concentration at the university’s Virtual Academic Center. Weiss is a California-licensed clinical social worker and licensed psychologist who has maintained a private practice for eighteen years working with military personnel and their families.

About Lyceum Books, Inc.:

Lyceum Books, a Chicago-based independent publishing house, produces innovative books and journals that have earned a reputation of excellence in social work education. Visit our website for instructor’s materials including lecture notes, test bank questions, paper topics and more at Lyceum Books.







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HOPE Sheds Light Launches Heroin Addiction Education Video Series


Toms River, NJ (PRWEB) April 13, 2015

HOPE Sheds Light, a Toms River, NJ nonprofit organization that brings awareness on heroin addiction to support healthier families in the community, has launched a new Addiction Education video series, which is housed on HOPE Sheds Light’s YouTube channel. “Our joy and the purpose of this series is to tell everyone that recovery is real,” said Steve Willis, Co-founder of HOPE Sheds Light. “We have an answer, a solution that is filled with joy and based fundamentally on love and years of experience.”

The organization offers information, support and treatment options to those suffering from addiction and their families. “We understand addiction like few others do because most of us have felt this feeling before,” said Arvo Prima, Co-founder of HOPE Sheds Light. “This disease is too powerful for most of us to go at alone, but together we can help one another find serenity, and even happiness, regardless of the actions of the qualifier. HOPE Sheds Light shows us a new and different way of life and that’s the message that we want these videos to convey.”

The video series will be used as an educational tool for school-aged children, teachers, Board of Education staff, parents, community leaders and the medical field. “We want to provide awareness about the disease that has become an epidemic in our community so that our youngsters can make better decisions,” said Ron Rosetto, Co-founder of HOPE Sheds Light.

HOPE Sheds Light was started after the Rosetto family lost their son Marc to substance abuse and heroin experimentation in 2012. “Since the family and friends of those with addiction problems often feel isolated, ashamed, overwhelmed and hopeless, HOPE Sheds Light was created to provide direction, resources and hope toward recovery and a future free from drug addiction,” Rosetto said.

Addiction is a manageable disease if treated properly, but can also be chronic, progressive and fatal if left untreated, according to Willis. “This disease affects the entire family – the individual, parents, siblings and grandparents,” he added.

It’s living a “true nightmare,” according to Prima. “Everyone’s first thought is to cover-up, manage and dismiss the addict’s behavior,” he said. HOPE Sheds Light hopes to break this pattern through education and the willingness to change. “HOPE Sheds Light is helping one person at a time, one family at a time, step by step because we care,” Rosetto added.

Those interested in joining HOPE Sheds Light are encouraged to volunteer their time or join a committee. “We cannot achieve our goals without your help,” said Willis. “Please consider joining our organization and instilling hope to our community.” To learn more, email info(at)HOPEShedsLight(dot)org.

HOPE Sheds Light has also announced it will hold its 2nd Annual Celebration of HOPE Walk on October 3rd in Seaside Heights, NJ. Learn more at HOPEShedsLight.org.

About HOPE Sheds Light

HOPE Sheds Light is an IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization (Tax ID: 46-3910504) founded by Ron Rosetto, Arvo Prima and Steve Willis with support from the Ocean County Prosecutor’s Office. Its mission is to educate families on the disease of addiction, including the most prevalent types related to heroin, opiates and prescription drugs, by creating awareness, providing resources and instilling hope to support a healthier community. To learn more, visit HOPEShedsLight.org or call 855.350.2790.







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Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







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UMass Amherst Launches Center for Data Science in Major Expansion of Big Data Research, Education and Collaboration with Industry


AMHERST, Mass. (PRWEB) April 09, 2015

The University of Massachusetts Amherst today launched a new Center for Data Science that will coordinate and significantly expand its capacity for research, education and industry collaboration in support of the exploding demand for acquisition and analysis of “big data.”

The launch was announced at a symposium that featured an array of business leaders from organizations including Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Thomson Reuters, MassMutual, Pratt and Whitney and the New England Venture Capital Association. James Kurose, head of computer science research for the National Science Foundation, delivered the keynote address. Steve Strassmann, chief technology officer for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Jennifer Chayes, managing director of Microsoft Research New England, were among the featured panelists. A detailed schedule of the symposium can viewed at http://ds.cs.umass.edu/launch.

UMass Amherst, recognized as an international leader in computing, projects an investment that leverages 80 new faculty working in data-science related areas. This includes 40 new faculty hired over the past five years and the projected hiring of 40 additional faculty in such areas over the next decade. The university is pursuing investments from industrial partners and government sources to invest over $ 100 million, including space expansion, to help meet its goals. The new center will help coordinate creation of a new master’s degree concentration in data science as well as new undergraduate degree tracks in computer science and informatics.

UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy said, “Our faculty are inspired by the complexities of real-world problems in key industries of the Commonwealth and the nation at large. The dramatic increase in private and public-sector demand for data science research and expertise has been an important driver of our investment in this center. We also know that demand for our data science graduates has been insatiable, and a vital part of the center will be expanding educational opportunities for talented data scientists.”

Katherine Newman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, added, “It is not hyperbole to claim that we have entered the ‘Age of Data,’ in which the most important advances in the international economy will be driven by the technical and analytical possibilities inherent in this new field. We are building on our strong international reputation in machine learning and other areas of data science, and investing heavily.”

The Center for Data Science is directed by Professor Andrew McCallum, an international leader in the fields of machine learning, information extraction and social network analysis. He is the current president of the International Machine Learning Society and among the most highly cited researchers internationally in the field of natural language processing. In the early 2000’s he was vice president of research and development at WhizBang Labs, a 170-person start-up company, and he has collaborated with more than 20 companies since joining the UMass Amherst faculty in 2003.

“I am tremendously excited to help UMass grow in this important field that combines such interesting intellectual research and broad impact,” said McCallum. “I am looking forward to stimulating collaborations spanning the many data science-related fields across the Five Colleges and with industry as we shape our research and education programs.” The new education programs will include opportunities for mentorships and internships with industrial partners.

Data science is an important driver of economic development in Massachusetts. According to the 2014 Massachusetts Big Data Report, published by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, nearly 500 companies in Massachusetts are working in data science. Venture capital investors have pumped more than $ 2.5 billion into Massachusetts-based data science companies fueling at least 80 start-ups in the last four years. Massachusetts colleges and universities produce nearly 6,000 data science graduates annually, but the demand for well-trained workers continues to outstrip the supply. The Mass Tech Leadership Council estimates there will be up to 120,000 data science jobs in Massachusetts by 2018 as more organizations continue to expand and integrate data science systems and capabilities.

McCallum noted that “data science develops and applies methods to collect, curate, and analyze large-scale data and to make discoveries and decisions using those analyses.” It addresses challenges from how to design accurate, wearable health sensors to the interpretation of images and text, to the design of algorithms for streaming data at a massive scale. “Tools for data science and students trained to use and extend those tools are in high demand,” he said, “because data science techniques have the power to transform existing business practices and spawn entirely new businesses and industries.”

The new UMass Amherst center will take advantage of its partnership with the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center in Holyoke, a research computing data center operated by five of the most research-intensive universities in the state, UMass Amherst, Boston University, Harvard University, MIT and Northeastern University. It serves the growing research computing needs of the five founding universities as well as other institutions.

Examples of ongoing data science partnerships and projects at UMass Amherst include a collaboration with Holyoke Gas & Electric to increase energy efficiency with smart meters and smart grid technology; a collaboration with Akamai to understand how billions of users around the world interact with Internet-based services; a National Institutes of Health project through the National Institutes of Health National Center of Excellence for Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge on the campus to study next-generation wearable health sensors, and data analytics for drug abuse and detox programs. There are currently about 150 faculty working in data science-related areas at UMass Amherst.







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Recent Reports State That 19 Million Americans Abuse Prescription Drugs; FDA and Novus Medical Detox Agree That Education is Needed


New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) August 11, 2014

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that 46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdose, which adds up to about 17,000 deaths annually. The reports also state that poisonings by drug overdose have tripled over the past 30 years. (1) Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, states that the reason behind the high number of fatalities lies in inadequate drug education.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carries this same belief, and has responded by implementing a new drug education program. The program seeks to educate doctors who prescribe these highly-addictive painkillers, as well as the patients who are taking them. The program’s mission is “to teach doctors about proper opiate prescribing for pain patients to minimize the risks of diversion and addiction.” (4)

The United Nation’s World Drug Report 2014 stated that in 2012, 6.1% (19 million) of Americans abused prescription opioids, including morphine, codeine, OxyContin and Vicodin. This figure categorizes the United States as a country that abuses prescription drugs more than any other country in the world. (2) In an effort to lower the number of people harmed by these drugs, Novus warns Americans to exercise caution when receiving a new prescription from a physician, and to ask questions related to its side effects.

“Intentionally or not, Americans may be underestimating the highly addictive nature of drugs such as opioids,” stated Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon. “It may start as nothing more than filling a prescription for legitimate pain, but overdose may result when a patient seeks to elicit a stronger high from these drugs.”

Novus recommends that the following steps be taken when being prescribed a new medication (3):

●    Be sure that the prescription comes from a trusted physician;

●    Only use the medication as prescribed;

●    Ask the physician about the medicine and its effects;

●    Conduct your own research about the drug’s effects; and

●    Be prepared—ask your doctor what to do if one becomes addicted.

All of these tips are important to heed before a patient starts to take a medication, because addiction may begin with the patient being unaware of a medication’s initial effects. This patient may begin to take pills more liberally than prescribed, and the dangers of addiction do not lie far behind.

Runyon maintains that comprehensive drug education, starting in grade school and continuing throughout adult life to physician visits, can help to significantly reduce the number of Americans addicted to such drugs.

While new preventative measures are being taken, Novus recommends looking out for the following symptoms or behaviors (but not limited to), if someone suspects that a loved one is abusing pain reliever prescription drugs (5):

●    Nausea, drowsiness;

●    Mood swings and anxiety;

●    Slowed reactions, movement and breathing;

●    Jittery or secretive; and/or

●    Neglect of work/school responsibilities.

Runyon advises those who are dependent upon any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

For more information on Novus Medical Detox’s addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, cable television, and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Hutchins, Sarah. “Drug Overdose: Prescription Painkillers Poison 46 Americans Every Day.” Liberty Voice, 20 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. guardianlv.com/2014/07/drug-overdose-prescription-painkillers-poison-46-americans-every-day/.

2.Blake, Matthew. “Extent of US Dependency on Prescription Drugs Revealed: UN Report Shows 6% of American Adults Hooked on Pills.” Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 07 July 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2683318/Extent-US-dependency-prescription-drugs-revealed-UN-report-shows-6-American-adults-hooked-pills.html.

3.Winkel, Bethany. “Avoiding Prescription Drug Abuse—Treatment Solutions.” Treatment Solutions. N.p., 11 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 July 2014. treatmentsolutions.com/avoiding-prescription-drug-abuse/.

4.Sack, David. “FDA Prescription Drug Abuse Plan Hits—and Misses—the Mark—Addiction Recovery.” Addiction Recovery with David Sack, M.D. Psych Central.com, 7 July 2014. Web. 22 July 2014. blogs.psychcentral.com/addiction-recovery/2014/07/fda-prescription-drug-abuse-plan-hits-and-misses-the-mark/.

5.“Signs and Symptoms of Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse.” Narconon International, n.d. Web. 22 July 2014. narconon.org/drug-abuse/signs-symptoms-pain-relievers.html.







Lox to be Dean of the SIUE School of Education, Health & Human Behavior

Edwardsville, Ill. (PRWEB) March 20, 2015

Curt Lox, PhD, has been recommended as the new dean of the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior. Lox has served as interim dean since May 2014, and his permanent appointment is contingent upon SIU Board of Trustees approval.

Lox brings more than 20 years of academic experience with 19 of those at SIUE. The Orange County, Calif., native joined the School’s faculty in 1996. He served as associate dean from 2003-09 and as chairperson in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education from 2009-14.

“Dr. Lox’s experience and leadership at SIUE have prepared him well for this leadership role,” said Parviz Ansari, SIUE provost and vice chancellor for Academic Affairs. “Dr. Lox is highly prepared for the challenge of facing a difficult fiscal environment with a positive approach to problem solving. With a clear commitment to academic excellence, his vision for the School will lead to a bright future.”

Lox’s research has been focused on the psychological impact of exercise for special populations, including the elderly, overweight and obese children and adults, and individuals infected with HIV. His research articles have been published in the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Journal of Cognitive Rehabilitation, International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Journal of Health Psychology, and Rehabilitation Psychology among others. He is the co-author of The Psychology of Exercise: Integrating Theory and Practice, which is currently at press in its fourth edition.

“I want to thank Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe and Provost Ansari for the opportunity to serve this University and this School,” Lox said. “We have a wide range of programs with increasing recognition for our work – education, health sciences and human behavior. We have a strong tradition of preparing our students to serve the region as exceptional educators and administrators, speech pathologists or audiologists, or to work in exercise science, health education or psychology.

“Regardless of the field, we will work passionately to advance that reputation. It is certainly one of my goals to continue to promote the many accomplishments of our faculty, staff and students.”

Lox earned a doctorate in kinesiology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and his master’s from Miami (Ohio) University. He has worked as a sport psychology consultant with players and coaches at the interscholastic, intercollegiate and professional levels for more than 20 years. Lox currently serves as the sport psychologist for SIUE Intercollegiate Athletics and the United States Martial Arts Team.

Lox replaces Dr. Bette Bergeron, who resigned to assume duties as provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at Southern Connecticut State University.

The SIUE School of Education, Health and Human Behavior prepares students in a wide range of fields including community health education, exercise science, instructional technology, psychology, speech-language pathology and audiology, administration and teaching. Faculty members engage in leading-edge research, which enhances teaching and enriches the educational experience. The School supports the community through on-campus clinics, outreach to children and families, and a focused commitment to enhancing individual lives across the region.

-SIUE-

Photo: Dr. Curt Lox, dean of the SIUE School of Education, Health and Human Behavior.