Tag Archives: Drug

Risperdal Lawsuit Claims Contending Males Taking The Antipsychotic Drug Causes Gynecomastia Move Forward With October Meeting Reports Wright & Schulte LLC


Columbus, OH (PRWEB) October 11, 2014

As Risperdal lawsuit claims continue in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, another monthly meeting has been scheduled for parties to discuss the litigation surrounding antipsychotic drugs and the development of male breasts or gynecomastia. According to court records there are nearly 80 Risperdal lawsuit claims pending in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas mass tort program. The court’s calendar shows attorneys for the plaintiffs and defendants are scheduled to meet on October 15, at the Complex Litigation Center in Philadelphia’s City Hall. The Risperdal side-effects complaints were filed on behalf of males who allege that they experienced gynecomastia, which is excessive male breast growth similar to that of a woman after using the antipsychotic drug. The Risperdal side-effect lawsuits purport that Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiary, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which manufactures and markets the drug, failed to warn consumers and health care providers about the serious side-effects of taking Risperdal. (In Re: Risperdal Litigation, Case Number 100300296)

Risperdal gynecomastia is a devastating condition that can have far reaching effects on a boy’s social development and quality of life. The attorneys at Wright & Schulte LLC are committed to ensuring that the victims of Risperdal gynecomastia obtain the justice they deserve. To learn more, please contact Wright & Schulte LLC for a free Risperdal lawsuit consultation to ensure you are treated fairly and receive all of the compensation the law allows. Call 1-800-399-0795 or visit http://www.yourlegalhelp.com for more information.

In June, plaintiffs’ attorneys asked Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Arnold New, who is presiding over the Risperdal litigation, to reconsider his decision of preventing plaintiffs from asking for punitive damages against Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Judge New issued an order on July 18 reaffirming his earlier decision to deny punitive damages to plaintiffs but they can still ask for compensatory damages. The issue of punitive damages arose as a result of Janssen asking Judge New to allow the New Jersey Product Liability Act to apply in the Risperdal litigation because the company is headquartered in New Jersey. The New Jersey Product Liability Act does not allow punitive damages to be awarded against manufacturers of prescription drugs or medical devices if they have received pre-market approval by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA). Plaintiffs’ attorneys contend that the defendants marketed Risperdal for uses that were not approved by the FDA and therefore, punitive damages should be allowed. Judge New initially granted Janssen’s motion in an order issued May 2, 2014. (In Re: Risperdal Litigation, Case Number 100300296)

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., was the subject of a criminal investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for marketing Risperdal for uses that were not approved by the FDA. According to the DOJ, Janssen did not have FDA approval when the company marketed the antipsychotic medication for use in children and adolescents with behavior challenges and the company did not disclose the health risks associated with use of the drug. In November 2013, the DOJ announced that Janssen was charged with a criminal count of misbranding Risperdal and Janssen pleaded guilty to the charge. The company also agreed to pay a $ 400 million criminal fine. The DOJ said Risperdal was not approved for use in children for any purpose until late 2006. Janssen was also under criminal investigation for marketing Risperdal for unapproved use in elderly dementia patients. The DOJ charged Janssen in this case with introducing a misbranded drug into interstate commerce. The company also paid $ 1.25 billion to settle a separate civil case regarding Risperdal. [justice.gov/opa/pr/2013/November/13-ag-1170.html, November 4, 2013] [fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm373499.htm, November 4, 2013]

Risperdal is approved by the FDA as an atypical antipsychotic drug to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and irritability in autistic children and adolescents. An investigation by the Los Angeles Daily News showed children in California’s foster care system have been prescribed psychiatric drugs, including Risperdal, Prozac, and Haldol, to control their behavior, although the medications have not been approved by the FDA use by children. The Los Angeles Daily News said it looked at 10 years of data that begins in 2004. The newspaper’s investigation found that nearly 1 out of every 4 adolescents in California’s foster care system is receiving psychiatric drugs, which is three times the rate for all adolescents nationwide. The newspaper reported that of the thousands of foster children prescribed psychotropic drugs in the last 10 years, nearly 60 percent were prescribed an antipsychotic, which are the highest risk psychotropic drugs. The newspaper further reported that the percentage of foster children who were prescribed two or more psychotropic medications increased from 10.1 percent in 2004 to 12.2 percent in 2013.

[dailynews.com/health/20140823/children-in-californias-foster-care-system-are-prescribed-risky-medications, August 23, 2014]

About Wright & Schulte LLC

Wright & Schulte LLC, an experienced personal injury firm, is dedicated to the belief that America’s legal system should work for the people. Every day, the attorneys of Wright & Schulte LLC stand up for the rights of people who have been injured or wronged and fight tirelessly to ensure that even the world’s most powerful corporations take responsibility for their actions. If you’re looking for a law firm that will guarantee the aggressive and personal representation you deserve, please do not hesitate to contact Wright & Schulte LLC today. Free Risperdal lawsuit case evaluations are available through yourlegalhelp.com or by calling 1-800-399-0795.

Contact:

Wright & Schulte LLC

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Vandalia, Ohio 45377

1-800-399-0795

http://www.yourlegalhelp.com

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New Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post Asks: What are the Most Addictive Painkillers?


(PRWEB) April 08, 2014

Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is asking a critically important and timely question in its latest blog post: What are the most additive painkillers?

“Many people still believe that drug abuse and drug addiction only refer to illicit drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and so on,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, there is a prescription drug abuse problem happening in our country that is, without question, of epidemic proportions, and affecting people from all walks of like, and of all ages – from children to seniors.”

According to the Best Drug Rehabilitation blog post, opioids remain the most abused prescription painkillers. Opioids relieve pain by minimizing the pain signals in the brain, plus they can create a feeling of euphoria. However, the body requires more and more of the drug to achieve a desired state of physical and emotional wellness, which is what leads to a spiralling path of addiction. Some commonly used – and unfortunately, commonly abused – opioids include (but is not limited to):


Vicodin
Methadone
Dilaudid
Duragesic
Demerol
Percoce
Propoxyphene
Oxymorphone
Oxycodone HCL
Meperidine
Hydromorphone
Bitartrate
Fentanyl
Hydrocodone

Added Per Wickstrom: “Individuals who are addicted or are concerned that they may be heading down that road can get the professional, compassionate help they need through inpatient treatment programs. Their family members and loved ones who desperately want to help an addict can also call a qualified and certified treatment facility to learn how they can be part of the solution.”

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog entitled “What are the Most Addictive Painkillers?” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/addiction/what-are-the-most-addictive-painkillers/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/.







Top 6 Things Never to Say to a Recovering Addict, the Topic of Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post


(PRWEB) October 23, 2014

In a new blog post, Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is listing the top 6 things never to say to a recovering addict.

“We’ve all put our foot in our mouth – or maybe both feet – and said something that we deeply regretted,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, most of the time, our regret is self-directed. That is, we may have said the wrong thing to our boss or a spouse, and we brace ourselves for the consequences. However, with addicts, the situation is very different. People who say the wrong things – accidentally or even with good intentions – can make it that much harder for recovering addicts to stay on a path of sobriety.”

According to Best Drug Rehabilitation, the 6 things never to say to a recovering addict are:

1.    “You must be getting so tired of going to meetings.” While there may be some truth in this — meetings can indeed get tiring at times – recovering addicts need all of the support they can get to stay focused and committed. It’s more than their enrollment in a program that’s at stake; it could be their life.

2.    “You’re getting better, so quit therapy.” Getting better is not a sign that it’s time to stop therapy; on the contrary, it’s an indication that therapy is working. Recovering addicts need to see their positive growth and development as reasons to stay with their respective therapy program.

3.    “Let’s just meet for one drink.” Non-addicts (and addicts who are in denial and haven’t yet sought treatment) can fail to realize that there’s no such thing as “one drink.” There is drinking, and there is not drinking. Telling a recovering addict to have one drink is in no way helping them; in fact, it’s opening the door to what could be a relapse.

4.    “You shouldn’t crave drugs since you’ve been clean for so long.” Telling an addict what they “shouldn’t crave” isn’t merely extremely ignorant; it’s also quite offensive. It implies that recovering addicts are somehow weak or defective if they still have cravings. This is patently untrue, and it simply means that addicts need to seek proper care and support to manage and overcome their cravings.

5.    “You’ll be an addict forever.” Again, this is totally untrue. recovering addicts cease being addicts when, with proper care and support, they liberate themselves from drugs and alcohol.

6.    “You should really talk to your old friends.” This one is tricky, since it could be beneficial for a recovering addict to reconnect with old friends. However, such advice should only be given if it will in no way expose an addict to situations or pressures that could trigger a relapse.

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog post entitled “6 Things You Shouldn’t Say to a Recovering Addict” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/sobriety/6-things-you-shouldnt-say-to-a-recovering-addict/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/







New Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post Asks: What are the Most Addictive Painkillers?


(PRWEB) April 08, 2014

Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is asking a critically important and timely question in its latest blog post: What are the most additive painkillers?

“Many people still believe that drug abuse and drug addiction only refer to illicit drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and so on,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, there is a prescription drug abuse problem happening in our country that is, without question, of epidemic proportions, and affecting people from all walks of like, and of all ages – from children to seniors.”

According to the Best Drug Rehabilitation blog post, opioids remain the most abused prescription painkillers. Opioids relieve pain by minimizing the pain signals in the brain, plus they can create a feeling of euphoria. However, the body requires more and more of the drug to achieve a desired state of physical and emotional wellness, which is what leads to a spiralling path of addiction. Some commonly used – and unfortunately, commonly abused – opioids include (but is not limited to):


Vicodin
Methadone
Dilaudid
Duragesic
Demerol
Percoce
Propoxyphene
Oxymorphone
Oxycodone HCL
Meperidine
Hydromorphone
Bitartrate
Fentanyl
Hydrocodone

Added Per Wickstrom: “Individuals who are addicted or are concerned that they may be heading down that road can get the professional, compassionate help they need through inpatient treatment programs. Their family members and loved ones who desperately want to help an addict can also call a qualified and certified treatment facility to learn how they can be part of the solution.”

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog entitled “What are the Most Addictive Painkillers?” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/addiction/what-are-the-most-addictive-painkillers/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/.







More than 2,100 GranuFlo Lawsuits Now Filed in Federal Dialysis Drug Litigation, Bernstein Liebhard LLP Reports


New York, NY (PRWEB) October 19, 2014

The federal litigation involving GranuFlo lawsuits (http://www.injurybeacon.com/granuflo-dialysis/lawsuit/) is continuing to move forward in Massachusetts federal court, where more than 2,100 claims have now been filed over the dialysis medication, Bernstein Liebhard LLP reports.

A Case List updated on October 15th shows 2,127 claims now filed over GranuFlo and NaturaLyte in a federal litigation underway in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts. Plaintiffs in these lawsuits accuse the drugs’ manufacturer, Fresenius Medical Care, of failing to adequately warn patients and their doctors about the risk for strokes, heart attacks, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest, sudden cardiac death and other life-threatening heart problems to stem from either of the acid concentrates. Given these side effects, plaintiffs allege that GranuFlo and NaturaLyte were designed defectively. (In re Fresenius GranuFlo/Naturalyte Dialysate Litigation, MDL No. 2428)

“We are not surprised to see more than 2,100 claims filed in the federal GranuFlo litigation, as our Firm’s attorneys hear on a regular basis from individuals who were allegedly injured by the acid concentrate,” says Bernstein Liebhard LLP, a nationwide law firm representing victims of defective medical devices and drugs including GranuFlo and NaturaLyte. The Firm is eager to speak with anyone who allegedly suffered serious cardiovascular problems within 72 hours of undergoing a dialysis treatment that used either of the acid concentrates.

GranuFlo Lawsuits

Manufactured by Fresenius Medical Care, GranuFlo and NaturaLyte are designed to remove toxins that accumulate during dialysis. The medications became a subject of scrutiny two years ago when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Class I recall that determined their potential to cause cardiovascular injuries to be serious and potentially fatal. Prior to that, dialysis centers owned by GranuFlo and NaturaLyte’s manufacturer, Fresenius Medical Care, administered the drugs in their facilities, as did more than 125,000 customer clinics outside the company’s network.

Plaintiffs in more than 2,100 claims now filed in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts allege problems with Fresenius’ handling of the GranuFlo recall, and accuse the company of withholding vital information about the safety of its products that may have placed thousands of dialysis patients at risk. Shortly after the FDA’s notice about possible problems with GranuFlo and NaturaLyte, the New York Times reported that the regulator was looking into whether the company violated federal regulations in failing to warn dialysis patients about risks that may be associated with its products. An internal memo sent by Fresenius in November 2011 warned of hundreds of patient deaths that occurred in Fresenius centers that administered GranuFlo treatments. Despite their knowledge of dialysis drug problems, the company continued to aggressively market the GranuFlo and NaturaLyte in order to protect their market share, plaintiffs allege.

In addition to thousands of federally-filed dialysis lawsuits filed in Massachusetts, court documents show several more consolidated in a state proceeding underway in Middlesex County Superior Court. More than 3,900 lawsuits are now pending in that litigation, according to recent filings. (In re: Consolidated Fresenius Cases, No. MICV2013-03400-O).

Not unlike cases filed in federal court, GranuFlo plaintiffs in Middlesex County allege that an Urgent Product Notification issued in March 2012 by Fresenius was insufficient in warning patients about metabolic alkalosis, a condition referring to elevated pH levels in the blood stream that may derive from an overdose of the acid concentrates, and cause strokes, heart attacks and other cardiovascular injuries.

Dialysis patients who were allegedly harmed by GranuFlo or NaturaLyte may be entitled to take legal action against Fresenius Medical Care. Learn more about filing a GranuFlo lawsuit by visiting Bernstein Liebhard LLP’s website, or the Firm’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/granuflolawsuit. For additional information, and to arrange for a free case review, please call 800-511-5092.

About Bernstein Liebhard LLP

Bernstein Liebhard LLP is a New York-based law firm exclusively representing injured persons in complex individual and class action lawsuits nationwide since 1993. As a national law firm, Bernstein Liebhard LLP possesses all of the legal and financial resources required to successfully challenge billion dollar pharmaceutical and medical device companies. As a result, our attorneys and legal staff have been able to recover more than $ 3 billion on behalf of our clients. The Firm has been named by The National Law Journal to the Plaintiffs’ Hot List, recognizing the top plaintiffs firms in the country, for the past 12 consecutive years. Bernstein Liebhard LLP is the only firm in the country to be named to this prestigious list every year since it was first published in 2003.

Bernstein Liebhard LLP

10 East 40th Street

New York, New York 10016

800-511-5092

ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. © 2014 Bernstein Liebhard LLP. The law firm responsible for this advertisement is Bernstein Liebhard LLP, 10 East 40th Street, New York, New York 10016, 800-511-5092. Prior results do not guarantee or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter.

Contact Information:

Felecia L. Stern, Esq.

Bernstein Liebhard LLP

info(at)consumerinjurylawyers(dot)com

http://www.injurybeacon.com/

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Top 6 Things Never to Say to a Recovering Addict, the Topic of Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post


(PRWEB) October 23, 2014

In a new blog post, Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is listing the top 6 things never to say to a recovering addict.

“We’ve all put our foot in our mouth – or maybe both feet – and said something that we deeply regretted,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, most of the time, our regret is self-directed. That is, we may have said the wrong thing to our boss or a spouse, and we brace ourselves for the consequences. However, with addicts, the situation is very different. People who say the wrong things – accidentally or even with good intentions – can make it that much harder for recovering addicts to stay on a path of sobriety.”

According to Best Drug Rehabilitation, the 6 things never to say to a recovering addict are:

1.    “You must be getting so tired of going to meetings.” While there may be some truth in this — meetings can indeed get tiring at times – recovering addicts need all of the support they can get to stay focused and committed. It’s more than their enrollment in a program that’s at stake; it could be their life.

2.    “You’re getting better, so quit therapy.” Getting better is not a sign that it’s time to stop therapy; on the contrary, it’s an indication that therapy is working. Recovering addicts need to see their positive growth and development as reasons to stay with their respective therapy program.

3.    “Let’s just meet for one drink.” Non-addicts (and addicts who are in denial and haven’t yet sought treatment) can fail to realize that there’s no such thing as “one drink.” There is drinking, and there is not drinking. Telling a recovering addict to have one drink is in no way helping them; in fact, it’s opening the door to what could be a relapse.

4.    “You shouldn’t crave drugs since you’ve been clean for so long.” Telling an addict what they “shouldn’t crave” isn’t merely extremely ignorant; it’s also quite offensive. It implies that recovering addicts are somehow weak or defective if they still have cravings. This is patently untrue, and it simply means that addicts need to seek proper care and support to manage and overcome their cravings.

5.    “You’ll be an addict forever.” Again, this is totally untrue. recovering addicts cease being addicts when, with proper care and support, they liberate themselves from drugs and alcohol.

6.    “You should really talk to your old friends.” This one is tricky, since it could be beneficial for a recovering addict to reconnect with old friends. However, such advice should only be given if it will in no way expose an addict to situations or pressures that could trigger a relapse.

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog post entitled “6 Things You Shouldn’t Say to a Recovering Addict” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/sobriety/6-things-you-shouldnt-say-to-a-recovering-addict/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/







New Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post Asks: What are the Most Addictive Painkillers?


(PRWEB) April 08, 2014

Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is asking a critically important and timely question in its latest blog post: What are the most additive painkillers?

“Many people still believe that drug abuse and drug addiction only refer to illicit drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and so on,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, there is a prescription drug abuse problem happening in our country that is, without question, of epidemic proportions, and affecting people from all walks of like, and of all ages – from children to seniors.”

According to the Best Drug Rehabilitation blog post, opioids remain the most abused prescription painkillers. Opioids relieve pain by minimizing the pain signals in the brain, plus they can create a feeling of euphoria. However, the body requires more and more of the drug to achieve a desired state of physical and emotional wellness, which is what leads to a spiralling path of addiction. Some commonly used – and unfortunately, commonly abused – opioids include (but is not limited to):


Vicodin
Methadone
Dilaudid
Duragesic
Demerol
Percoce
Propoxyphene
Oxymorphone
Oxycodone HCL
Meperidine
Hydromorphone
Bitartrate
Fentanyl
Hydrocodone

Added Per Wickstrom: “Individuals who are addicted or are concerned that they may be heading down that road can get the professional, compassionate help they need through inpatient treatment programs. Their family members and loved ones who desperately want to help an addict can also call a qualified and certified treatment facility to learn how they can be part of the solution.”

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog entitled “What are the Most Addictive Painkillers?” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/addiction/what-are-the-most-addictive-painkillers/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/.







Top 6 Things Never to Say to a Recovering Addict, the Topic of Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post


(PRWEB) October 23, 2014

In a new blog post, Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is listing the top 6 things never to say to a recovering addict.

“We’ve all put our foot in our mouth – or maybe both feet – and said something that we deeply regretted,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, most of the time, our regret is self-directed. That is, we may have said the wrong thing to our boss or a spouse, and we brace ourselves for the consequences. However, with addicts, the situation is very different. People who say the wrong things – accidentally or even with good intentions – can make it that much harder for recovering addicts to stay on a path of sobriety.”

According to Best Drug Rehabilitation, the 6 things never to say to a recovering addict are:

1.    “You must be getting so tired of going to meetings.” While there may be some truth in this — meetings can indeed get tiring at times – recovering addicts need all of the support they can get to stay focused and committed. It’s more than their enrollment in a program that’s at stake; it could be their life.

2.    “You’re getting better, so quit therapy.” Getting better is not a sign that it’s time to stop therapy; on the contrary, it’s an indication that therapy is working. Recovering addicts need to see their positive growth and development as reasons to stay with their respective therapy program.

3.    “Let’s just meet for one drink.” Non-addicts (and addicts who are in denial and haven’t yet sought treatment) can fail to realize that there’s no such thing as “one drink.” There is drinking, and there is not drinking. Telling a recovering addict to have one drink is in no way helping them; in fact, it’s opening the door to what could be a relapse.

4.    “You shouldn’t crave drugs since you’ve been clean for so long.” Telling an addict what they “shouldn’t crave” isn’t merely extremely ignorant; it’s also quite offensive. It implies that recovering addicts are somehow weak or defective if they still have cravings. This is patently untrue, and it simply means that addicts need to seek proper care and support to manage and overcome their cravings.

5.    “You’ll be an addict forever.” Again, this is totally untrue. recovering addicts cease being addicts when, with proper care and support, they liberate themselves from drugs and alcohol.

6.    “You should really talk to your old friends.” This one is tricky, since it could be beneficial for a recovering addict to reconnect with old friends. However, such advice should only be given if it will in no way expose an addict to situations or pressures that could trigger a relapse.

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog post entitled “6 Things You Shouldn’t Say to a Recovering Addict” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/sobriety/6-things-you-shouldnt-say-to-a-recovering-addict/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/







Top 6 Things Never to Say to a Recovering Addict, the Topic of Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post


(PRWEB) October 23, 2014

In a new blog post, Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is listing the top 6 things never to say to a recovering addict.

“We’ve all put our foot in our mouth – or maybe both feet – and said something that we deeply regretted,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, most of the time, our regret is self-directed. That is, we may have said the wrong thing to our boss or a spouse, and we brace ourselves for the consequences. However, with addicts, the situation is very different. People who say the wrong things – accidentally or even with good intentions – can make it that much harder for recovering addicts to stay on a path of sobriety.”

According to Best Drug Rehabilitation, the 6 things never to say to a recovering addict are:

1.    “You must be getting so tired of going to meetings.” While there may be some truth in this — meetings can indeed get tiring at times – recovering addicts need all of the support they can get to stay focused and committed. It’s more than their enrollment in a program that’s at stake; it could be their life.

2.    “You’re getting better, so quit therapy.” Getting better is not a sign that it’s time to stop therapy; on the contrary, it’s an indication that therapy is working. Recovering addicts need to see their positive growth and development as reasons to stay with their respective therapy program.

3.    “Let’s just meet for one drink.” Non-addicts (and addicts who are in denial and haven’t yet sought treatment) can fail to realize that there’s no such thing as “one drink.” There is drinking, and there is not drinking. Telling a recovering addict to have one drink is in no way helping them; in fact, it’s opening the door to what could be a relapse.

4.    “You shouldn’t crave drugs since you’ve been clean for so long.” Telling an addict what they “shouldn’t crave” isn’t merely extremely ignorant; it’s also quite offensive. It implies that recovering addicts are somehow weak or defective if they still have cravings. This is patently untrue, and it simply means that addicts need to seek proper care and support to manage and overcome their cravings.

5.    “You’ll be an addict forever.” Again, this is totally untrue. recovering addicts cease being addicts when, with proper care and support, they liberate themselves from drugs and alcohol.

6.    “You should really talk to your old friends.” This one is tricky, since it could be beneficial for a recovering addict to reconnect with old friends. However, such advice should only be given if it will in no way expose an addict to situations or pressures that could trigger a relapse.

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog post entitled “6 Things You Shouldn’t Say to a Recovering Addict” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/sobriety/6-things-you-shouldnt-say-to-a-recovering-addict/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/







Top 6 Things Never to Say to a Recovering Addict, the Topic of Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post


(PRWEB) October 23, 2014

In a new blog post, Best Drug Rehabilitation, which offers treatment programs and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful, is listing the top 6 things never to say to a recovering addict.

“We’ve all put our foot in our mouth – or maybe both feet – and said something that we deeply regretted,” commented Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO Per Wickstrom. “However, most of the time, our regret is self-directed. That is, we may have said the wrong thing to our boss or a spouse, and we brace ourselves for the consequences. However, with addicts, the situation is very different. People who say the wrong things – accidentally or even with good intentions – can make it that much harder for recovering addicts to stay on a path of sobriety.”

According to Best Drug Rehabilitation, the 6 things never to say to a recovering addict are:

1.    “You must be getting so tired of going to meetings.” While there may be some truth in this — meetings can indeed get tiring at times – recovering addicts need all of the support they can get to stay focused and committed. It’s more than their enrollment in a program that’s at stake; it could be their life.

2.    “You’re getting better, so quit therapy.” Getting better is not a sign that it’s time to stop therapy; on the contrary, it’s an indication that therapy is working. Recovering addicts need to see their positive growth and development as reasons to stay with their respective therapy program.

3.    “Let’s just meet for one drink.” Non-addicts (and addicts who are in denial and haven’t yet sought treatment) can fail to realize that there’s no such thing as “one drink.” There is drinking, and there is not drinking. Telling a recovering addict to have one drink is in no way helping them; in fact, it’s opening the door to what could be a relapse.

4.    “You shouldn’t crave drugs since you’ve been clean for so long.” Telling an addict what they “shouldn’t crave” isn’t merely extremely ignorant; it’s also quite offensive. It implies that recovering addicts are somehow weak or defective if they still have cravings. This is patently untrue, and it simply means that addicts need to seek proper care and support to manage and overcome their cravings.

5.    “You’ll be an addict forever.” Again, this is totally untrue. recovering addicts cease being addicts when, with proper care and support, they liberate themselves from drugs and alcohol.

6.    “You should really talk to your old friends.” This one is tricky, since it could be beneficial for a recovering addict to reconnect with old friends. However, such advice should only be given if it will in no way expose an addict to situations or pressures that could trigger a relapse.

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog post entitled “6 Things You Shouldn’t Say to a Recovering Addict” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/sobriety/6-things-you-shouldnt-say-to-a-recovering-addict/

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/