Tag Archives: Book

Book Review: The Cross and the Psychiatrist

Terry L Dorn’s The Cross and the Psychiatrist-Stopping a Modern-day Epidemic is a must read for everyone, particularly those who are close to individuals who have psychiatric disabilities. Throughout the text, the author emphasizes that these individuals should not be bound by a stigma and label. On the contrary, Dorn offers what all psychiatric patients and their family members seek: hope. Often times, being able to see the light at the end of the tunnel is enough to keep the individual pushing for a return to normalcy. Dorn vigorously supports this concept, and he firmly believes that the church, and faith in general, can help patients return to leading normal lives.

What sets this book apart from other psychiatric awareness texts is that the information does not make up a thousand-page textbook. Instead, this book essentially draws from the real-life experiences of Terry Dorn. One passage that is particularly indicative of Dorn’s stance states, “Mental illness has become the leprosy of this age. Stigma and ignorance has built a wall that keeps many of these wounded people away from being socially acceptable ever again.”

The truly staggering statistic that Dorn reveals in his introduction is that there are nearly 300,000 mental health consumers in Washington State alone, according to the Division of the Washington State Health and Human Services; however, there are likely twice that many in need of mental health who don’t come forward due to the stigma of becoming a social outcast. As a result, the author emphatically requests that family members and loved ones not scorn mental sufferers as they are already depressed and losing touch with family members and society at large. Shunning them will only plunge them into a deeper and darker reservoir of hopelessness and despair.

Ultimately, The Cross and the Psychiatrist is a story about an individual who loses his business, his wife, becomes homeless, and falls into a spiraling pattern of depression. This is the story about a painful past, growing up on the streets of Minneapolis, and being labeled as a psychiatric patient from a young age.

More than anything else, Dorn fulfills to perfection, the role of a liberator for mental illness patients, clearly outlining the premise: mental health patients want hope, to be cared for, and understood. They desire to be validated; they have worth. Terry L. Dorn, as author of The Cross and the Psychiatrist, is their advocate. For anyone who has ever wondered about the plight of patients who are mentally ill, their families, their issues–look no more. This wonderful book treats this sensitive subject with candor and dignity.

Want to find out more about hope and recovery, then see Terry L Dorn’s book about psychiatric disabilities.

Book Review: The Cross and the Psychiatrist

Terry L Dorn’s The Cross and the Psychiatrist-Stopping a Modern-day Epidemic is a must read for everyone, particularly those who are close to individuals who have psychiatric disabilities. Throughout the text, the author emphasizes that these individuals should not be bound by a stigma and label. On the contrary, Dorn offers what all psychiatric patients and their family members seek: hope. Often times, being able to see the light at the end of the tunnel is enough to keep the individual pushing for a return to normalcy. Dorn vigorously supports this concept, and he firmly believes that the church, and faith in general, can help patients return to leading normal lives.

What sets this book apart from other psychiatric awareness texts is that the information does not make up a thousand-page textbook. Instead, this book essentially draws from the real-life experiences of Terry Dorn. One passage that is particularly indicative of Dorn’s stance states, “Mental illness has become the leprosy of this age. Stigma and ignorance has built a wall that keeps many of these wounded people away from being socially acceptable ever again.”

The truly staggering statistic that Dorn reveals in his introduction is that there are nearly 300,000 mental health consumers in Washington State alone, according to the Division of the Washington State Health and Human Services; however, there are likely twice that many in need of mental health who don’t come forward due to the stigma of becoming a social outcast. As a result, the author emphatically requests that family members and loved ones not scorn mental sufferers as they are already depressed and losing touch with family members and society at large. Shunning them will only plunge them into a deeper and darker reservoir of hopelessness and despair.

Ultimately, The Cross and the Psychiatrist is a story about an individual who loses his business, his wife, becomes homeless, and falls into a spiraling pattern of depression. This is the story about a painful past, growing up on the streets of Minneapolis, and being labeled as a psychiatric patient from a young age.

More than anything else, Dorn fulfills to perfection, the role of a liberator for mental illness patients, clearly outlining the premise: mental health patients want hope, to be cared for, and understood. They desire to be validated; they have worth. Terry L. Dorn, as author of The Cross and the Psychiatrist, is their advocate. For anyone who has ever wondered about the plight of patients who are mentally ill, their families, their issues–look no more. This wonderful book treats this sensitive subject with candor and dignity.

Want to find out more about hope and recovery, then see Terry L Dorn’s book about psychiatric disabilities.

Book Review: The Cross and the Psychiatrist

Terry L Dorn’s The Cross and the Psychiatrist-Stopping a Modern-day Epidemic is a must read for everyone, particularly those who are close to individuals who have psychiatric disabilities. Throughout the text, the author emphasizes that these individuals should not be bound by a stigma and label. On the contrary, Dorn offers what all psychiatric patients and their family members seek: hope. Often times, being able to see the light at the end of the tunnel is enough to keep the individual pushing for a return to normalcy. Dorn vigorously supports this concept, and he firmly believes that the church, and faith in general, can help patients return to leading normal lives.

What sets this book apart from other psychiatric awareness texts is that the information does not make up a thousand-page textbook. Instead, this book essentially draws from the real-life experiences of Terry Dorn. One passage that is particularly indicative of Dorn’s stance states, “Mental illness has become the leprosy of this age. Stigma and ignorance has built a wall that keeps many of these wounded people away from being socially acceptable ever again.”

The truly staggering statistic that Dorn reveals in his introduction is that there are nearly 300,000 mental health consumers in Washington State alone, according to the Division of the Washington State Health and Human Services; however, there are likely twice that many in need of mental health who don’t come forward due to the stigma of becoming a social outcast. As a result, the author emphatically requests that family members and loved ones not scorn mental sufferers as they are already depressed and losing touch with family members and society at large. Shunning them will only plunge them into a deeper and darker reservoir of hopelessness and despair.

Ultimately, The Cross and the Psychiatrist is a story about an individual who loses his business, his wife, becomes homeless, and falls into a spiraling pattern of depression. This is the story about a painful past, growing up on the streets of Minneapolis, and being labeled as a psychiatric patient from a young age.

More than anything else, Dorn fulfills to perfection, the role of a liberator for mental illness patients, clearly outlining the premise: mental health patients want hope, to be cared for, and understood. They desire to be validated; they have worth. Terry L. Dorn, as author of The Cross and the Psychiatrist, is their advocate. For anyone who has ever wondered about the plight of patients who are mentally ill, their families, their issues–look no more. This wonderful book treats this sensitive subject with candor and dignity.

Want to find out more about hope and recovery, then see Terry L Dorn’s book about psychiatric disabilities.

Book Review: The Cross and the Psychiatrist

Terry L Dorn’s The Cross and the Psychiatrist-Stopping a Modern-day Epidemic is a must read for everyone, particularly those who are close to individuals who have psychiatric disabilities. Throughout the text, the author emphasizes that these individuals should not be bound by a stigma and label. On the contrary, Dorn offers what all psychiatric patients and their family members seek: hope. Often times, being able to see the light at the end of the tunnel is enough to keep the individual pushing for a return to normalcy. Dorn vigorously supports this concept, and he firmly believes that the church, and faith in general, can help patients return to leading normal lives.

What sets this book apart from other psychiatric awareness texts is that the information does not make up a thousand-page textbook. Instead, this book essentially draws from the real-life experiences of Terry Dorn. One passage that is particularly indicative of Dorn’s stance states, “Mental illness has become the leprosy of this age. Stigma and ignorance has built a wall that keeps many of these wounded people away from being socially acceptable ever again.”

The truly staggering statistic that Dorn reveals in his introduction is that there are nearly 300,000 mental health consumers in Washington State alone, according to the Division of the Washington State Health and Human Services; however, there are likely twice that many in need of mental health who don’t come forward due to the stigma of becoming a social outcast. As a result, the author emphatically requests that family members and loved ones not scorn mental sufferers as they are already depressed and losing touch with family members and society at large. Shunning them will only plunge them into a deeper and darker reservoir of hopelessness and despair.

Ultimately, The Cross and the Psychiatrist is a story about an individual who loses his business, his wife, becomes homeless, and falls into a spiraling pattern of depression. This is the story about a painful past, growing up on the streets of Minneapolis, and being labeled as a psychiatric patient from a young age.

More than anything else, Dorn fulfills to perfection, the role of a liberator for mental illness patients, clearly outlining the premise: mental health patients want hope, to be cared for, and understood. They desire to be validated; they have worth. Terry L. Dorn, as author of The Cross and the Psychiatrist, is their advocate. For anyone who has ever wondered about the plight of patients who are mentally ill, their families, their issues–look no more. This wonderful book treats this sensitive subject with candor and dignity.

Want to find out more about hope and recovery, then see Terry L Dorn’s book about psychiatric disabilities.

gI_59184_A%20Voice%20e%20book%20cover%2022

Forensic Psychiatrist Praises New Book, “A Voice Out of Nowhere,” For Highlighting the Dangerous Combination of Mental Illness and Mass Murder


Charlotte, NC (PRWEB) June 26, 2014

When 22-year-old Bruce Blackman began talking about the end of the world and that Armageddon was at hand, no-one paid much attention. Even when he insisted that he was God, Jehovah and the Antichrist, those around him failed to recognize the potential for violence that was brewing in his troubled mind. Blackman was succumbing to mental illness – in his case, schizophrenia – and mass murder would be the signature he left on the world. In the early morning hours of January 18, 1983, Bruce Blackman brutally slaughtered six members of his family claiming that the voices in his head told him it was the only way to save the world from blowing up. His story is chronicled in the new #1 best-seller, “A Voice out of Nowhere” by Janice Holly Booth.

Forensic psychiatrist Dr. Eugene Maloney has seen more than he cares to remember when it comes to mental illness and murder. An award-winning advocate for the mentally ill, Maloney is a proponent of early intervention. He says that the case of Bruce Blackman is a textbook example of how failure to recognize signs and symptoms of impending violence can lead to the worst possible outcome. “It took an orchestra of people to create this tragedy,” he says, referring to the failure of the family and the treating psychiatrist to take effective action. “A Voice out of Nowhere” is a cautionary tale, and “a brilliantly written journey into the mind of a mass murderer,” says Maloney. “Janice Holly Booth takes the reader into the mind of an inadequately treated schizophrenic and the devastating consequences. More importantly, she tells us how to prevent this horror.”

“A Voice out of Nowhere” is available in print and as an e-book. It is a #1 Amazon best-seller.

ABOUT JANICE HOLLY BOOTH: Janice Holly Booth was born and raised in British Columbia and has worked in the criminal justice system as well as a 20+ year career as a non-profit CEO. Her first book, “Only Pack What You Can Carry,” (National Geographic) was an international best-seller. Her latest book, “A Voice out of Nowhere,” was released in September 2013 and is a #1 Amazon best-seller. Janice is a full-time writer and speaker and currently resides near Charlotte, North Carolina.







Book Review: The Cross and the Psychiatrist

Terry L Dorn’s The Cross and the Psychiatrist-Stopping a Modern-day Epidemic is a must read for everyone, particularly those who are close to individuals who have psychiatric disabilities. Throughout the text, the author emphasizes that these individuals should not be bound by a stigma and label. On the contrary, Dorn offers what all psychiatric patients and their family members seek: hope. Often times, being able to see the light at the end of the tunnel is enough to keep the individual pushing for a return to normalcy. Dorn vigorously supports this concept, and he firmly believes that the church, and faith in general, can help patients return to leading normal lives.

What sets this book apart from other psychiatric awareness texts is that the information does not make up a thousand-page textbook. Instead, this book essentially draws from the real-life experiences of Terry Dorn. One passage that is particularly indicative of Dorn’s stance states, “Mental illness has become the leprosy of this age. Stigma and ignorance has built a wall that keeps many of these wounded people away from being socially acceptable ever again.”

The truly staggering statistic that Dorn reveals in his introduction is that there are nearly 300,000 mental health consumers in Washington State alone, according to the Division of the Washington State Health and Human Services; however, there are likely twice that many in need of mental health who don’t come forward due to the stigma of becoming a social outcast. As a result, the author emphatically requests that family members and loved ones not scorn mental sufferers as they are already depressed and losing touch with family members and society at large. Shunning them will only plunge them into a deeper and darker reservoir of hopelessness and despair.

Ultimately, The Cross and the Psychiatrist is a story about an individual who loses his business, his wife, becomes homeless, and falls into a spiraling pattern of depression. This is the story about a painful past, growing up on the streets of Minneapolis, and being labeled as a psychiatric patient from a young age.

More than anything else, Dorn fulfills to perfection, the role of a liberator for mental illness patients, clearly outlining the premise: mental health patients want hope, to be cared for, and understood. They desire to be validated; they have worth. Terry L. Dorn, as author of The Cross and the Psychiatrist, is their advocate. For anyone who has ever wondered about the plight of patients who are mentally ill, their families, their issues–look no more. This wonderful book treats this sensitive subject with candor and dignity.

Want to find out more about hope and recovery, then see Terry L Dorn’s book about psychiatric disabilities.

gI_59184_A%20Voice%20e%20book%20cover%2021

Forensic Psychiatrist Praises New Book, “A Voice Out of Nowhere,” For Highlighting the Dangerous Combination of Mental Illness and Mass Murder


Charlotte, NC (PRWEB) June 26, 2014

When 22-year-old Bruce Blackman began talking about the end of the world and that Armageddon was at hand, no-one paid much attention. Even when he insisted that he was God, Jehovah and the Antichrist, those around him failed to recognize the potential for violence that was brewing in his troubled mind. Blackman was succumbing to mental illness – in his case, schizophrenia – and mass murder would be the signature he left on the world. In the early morning hours of January 18, 1983, Bruce Blackman brutally slaughtered six members of his family claiming that the voices in his head told him it was the only way to save the world from blowing up. His story is chronicled in the new #1 best-seller, “A Voice out of Nowhere” by Janice Holly Booth.

Forensic psychiatrist Dr. Eugene Maloney has seen more than he cares to remember when it comes to mental illness and murder. An award-winning advocate for the mentally ill, Maloney is a proponent of early intervention. He says that the case of Bruce Blackman is a textbook example of how failure to recognize signs and symptoms of impending violence can lead to the worst possible outcome. “It took an orchestra of people to create this tragedy,” he says, referring to the failure of the family and the treating psychiatrist to take effective action. “A Voice out of Nowhere” is a cautionary tale, and “a brilliantly written journey into the mind of a mass murderer,” says Maloney. “Janice Holly Booth takes the reader into the mind of an inadequately treated schizophrenic and the devastating consequences. More importantly, she tells us how to prevent this horror.”

“A Voice out of Nowhere” is available in print and as an e-book. It is a #1 Amazon best-seller.

ABOUT JANICE HOLLY BOOTH: Janice Holly Booth was born and raised in British Columbia and has worked in the criminal justice system as well as a 20+ year career as a non-profit CEO. Her first book, “Only Pack What You Can Carry,” (National Geographic) was an international best-seller. Her latest book, “A Voice out of Nowhere,” was released in September 2013 and is a #1 Amazon best-seller. Janice is a full-time writer and speaker and currently resides near Charlotte, North Carolina.







Forensic Psychiatrist Praises New Book, “A Voice Out of Nowhere,” For Highlighting the Dangerous Combination of Mental Illness and Mass Murder


Charlotte, NC (PRWEB) June 26, 2014

When 22-year-old Bruce Blackman began talking about the end of the world and that Armageddon was at hand, no-one paid much attention. Even when he insisted that he was God, Jehovah and the Antichrist, those around him failed to recognize the potential for violence that was brewing in his troubled mind. Blackman was succumbing to mental illness – in his case, schizophrenia – and mass murder would be the signature he left on the world. In the early morning hours of January 18, 1983, Bruce Blackman brutally slaughtered six members of his family claiming that the voices in his head told him it was the only way to save the world from blowing up. His story is chronicled in the new #1 best-seller, “A Voice out of Nowhere” by Janice Holly Booth.

Forensic psychiatrist Dr. Eugene Maloney has seen more than he cares to remember when it comes to mental illness and murder. An award-winning advocate for the mentally ill, Maloney is a proponent of early intervention. He says that the case of Bruce Blackman is a textbook example of how failure to recognize signs and symptoms of impending violence can lead to the worst possible outcome. “It took an orchestra of people to create this tragedy,” he says, referring to the failure of the family and the treating psychiatrist to take effective action. “A Voice out of Nowhere” is a cautionary tale, and “a brilliantly written journey into the mind of a mass murderer,” says Maloney. “Janice Holly Booth takes the reader into the mind of an inadequately treated schizophrenic and the devastating consequences. More importantly, she tells us how to prevent this horror.”

“A Voice out of Nowhere” is available in print and as an e-book. It is a #1 Amazon best-seller.

ABOUT JANICE HOLLY BOOTH: Janice Holly Booth was born and raised in British Columbia and has worked in the criminal justice system as well as a 20+ year career as a non-profit CEO. Her first book, “Only Pack What You Can Carry,” (National Geographic) was an international best-seller. Her latest book, “A Voice out of Nowhere,” was released in September 2013 and is a #1 Amazon best-seller. Janice is a full-time writer and speaker and currently resides near Charlotte, North Carolina.







Book Review: The Cross and the Psychiatrist

Terry L Dorn’s The Cross and the Psychiatrist-Stopping a Modern-day Epidemic is a must read for everyone, particularly those who are close to individuals who have psychiatric disabilities. Throughout the text, the author emphasizes that these individuals should not be bound by a stigma and label. On the contrary, Dorn offers what all psychiatric patients and their family members seek: hope. Often times, being able to see the light at the end of the tunnel is enough to keep the individual pushing for a return to normalcy. Dorn vigorously supports this concept, and he firmly believes that the church, and faith in general, can help patients return to leading normal lives.

What sets this book apart from other psychiatric awareness texts is that the information does not make up a thousand-page textbook. Instead, this book essentially draws from the real-life experiences of Terry Dorn. One passage that is particularly indicative of Dorn’s stance states, “Mental illness has become the leprosy of this age. Stigma and ignorance has built a wall that keeps many of these wounded people away from being socially acceptable ever again.”

The truly staggering statistic that Dorn reveals in his introduction is that there are nearly 300,000 mental health consumers in Washington State alone, according to the Division of the Washington State Health and Human Services; however, there are likely twice that many in need of mental health who don’t come forward due to the stigma of becoming a social outcast. As a result, the author emphatically requests that family members and loved ones not scorn mental sufferers as they are already depressed and losing touch with family members and society at large. Shunning them will only plunge them into a deeper and darker reservoir of hopelessness and despair.

Ultimately, The Cross and the Psychiatrist is a story about an individual who loses his business, his wife, becomes homeless, and falls into a spiraling pattern of depression. This is the story about a painful past, growing up on the streets of Minneapolis, and being labeled as a psychiatric patient from a young age.

More than anything else, Dorn fulfills to perfection, the role of a liberator for mental illness patients, clearly outlining the premise: mental health patients want hope, to be cared for, and understood. They desire to be validated; they have worth. Terry L. Dorn, as author of The Cross and the Psychiatrist, is their advocate. For anyone who has ever wondered about the plight of patients who are mentally ill, their families, their issues–look no more. This wonderful book treats this sensitive subject with candor and dignity.

Want to find out more about hope and recovery, then see Terry L Dorn’s book about psychiatric disabilities.

“When It’s Cancer” Self-Help Book to Take Charge of Cancer

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 16, 2006

A new book “When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis” by Toni Bernay, Ph.D., and Saar Porrath, M.D. provides readers with a practical 10-step program that empowers patients and their loved ones to take charge and be proactive about cancer treatment and care as well as a series of self-assessments, worksheets, and checklists for tracking information to make intelligent, well-reasoned choices. Below you will find an excerpt from the book.

Once your pain management team is in place, you can work together to create a plan that anticipates every level of pain and institutes measures for alleviating it. Remember, the key to effective pain management is early intervention — and that starts with you. You need to inform your team when you’re hurting, where, and how much. This is why being able to talk with them comfortably and candidly is so important. (We’ve provided tools ahead that might help with this conversation.)

As you meet with your team members, you might want to share with them the following pain management model. It establishes a continuum of care to track with pain that ranges from mild to severe.

1. Complementary and alternative therapies: We recommend CAM therapies as a starting point because they are the least toxic. Your body will be exposed to plenty of toxins during cancer treatment; it doesn’t need more. Also, with CAM therapies, you spare your body from the side effects of yet another medication. Acupuncture, chiropractic, hypnosis, massage, and meditation are among the options that have proven successful in controlling pain.

2. Psychotropic drugs: Mediated via neurotransmitters, these medications help manage emotional distresses like depression and anxiety, both of which aggravate pain. Since scientists have determined that neurotransmitters inhabit the entire body, not just the brain, psychotropics have become some of the most frequently prescribed drugs for pain management.

3. Over-the-counter medications: Among the most common OTC pain relievers are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. They may be enough to alleviate mild pain.

4. Low-dose opioids: Seventy to 90 percent of cancer patients control moderate pain with oral opioids such as Darvon, Percodan, and Percocet. The long-term use of these medications has not been shown to worsen pain. If that should happen in individual cases, the patients may be advised to switch to an opioid other than the one they have been using.

5. Slow-or fast-release opioids: Perhaps the best known of the opioids is morphine, which is sold under several brand names. It’s the most commonly prescribed medication for severe pain and is available in slow-or fast-release forms. Other slow-release opioids, which tend to have longer-lasting effects, include Fentanyl, Levorphanol, methadone, MS Contin, and Oramorph. In the fast-release category are codeine, hydromorphone, and oxycodone. When taken as prescribed, opioids — though quite potent — rarely lead to addiction.

6. Invasive procedures: For acute pain and some chronic pain, a nerve block can provide temporary relief. In this procedure, the physician injects a local anesthetic into or around nerves or below the skin at the site of pain. The anesthetic interrupts the transmission of pain signals to the brain, providing relief for up to several hours. In some instances where drug therapy is ineffective, the pain pathways may be redirected or severed through surgery or controlled with implanted devices.

Reprinted from: When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis by Toni Bernay, PhD, and Saar Porrath, MD (March 2006) © 2006 Toni Bernay, PhD Permission granted by Rodale, Inc., Emmaus, PA 18098. Available wherever books are sold or directly from the publisher by calling (800) 848-4735 or visit their website at http://www.rodalestore.com.

Author

Toni Bernay, Ph.D., is a nationally recognized psychologist and executive coach. She serves as president of the Porrath Foundation for Cancer Patient Advocacy and is a principal in the Leadership Equation Institute, a national consulting firm for executives and entrepreneurs. She resides in Beverly Hills.

Her husband, Saar Porrath, M.D., was a preeminent breast oncologist at the forefront of numerous advances in breast health and care. He established the nationally known Woman’s Breast Center in 1983. For his contributions to health care, he was honored by Los Angeles County, as well as the cities of Los Angeles and Santa Monica.

For more information, please visit http://www.porrathfoundation.org

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