Tag Archives: Book

“When It’s Cancer” Self-Help Book to Take Charge of Cancer

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 16, 2006

A new book “When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis” by Toni Bernay, Ph.D., and Saar Porrath, M.D. provides readers with a practical 10-step program that empowers patients and their loved ones to take charge and be proactive about cancer treatment and care as well as a series of self-assessments, worksheets, and checklists for tracking information to make intelligent, well-reasoned choices. Below you will find an excerpt from the book.

Once your pain management team is in place, you can work together to create a plan that anticipates every level of pain and institutes measures for alleviating it. Remember, the key to effective pain management is early intervention — and that starts with you. You need to inform your team when you’re hurting, where, and how much. This is why being able to talk with them comfortably and candidly is so important. (We’ve provided tools ahead that might help with this conversation.)

As you meet with your team members, you might want to share with them the following pain management model. It establishes a continuum of care to track with pain that ranges from mild to severe.

1. Complementary and alternative therapies: We recommend CAM therapies as a starting point because they are the least toxic. Your body will be exposed to plenty of toxins during cancer treatment; it doesn’t need more. Also, with CAM therapies, you spare your body from the side effects of yet another medication. Acupuncture, chiropractic, hypnosis, massage, and meditation are among the options that have proven successful in controlling pain.

2. Psychotropic drugs: Mediated via neurotransmitters, these medications help manage emotional distresses like depression and anxiety, both of which aggravate pain. Since scientists have determined that neurotransmitters inhabit the entire body, not just the brain, psychotropics have become some of the most frequently prescribed drugs for pain management.

3. Over-the-counter medications: Among the most common OTC pain relievers are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. They may be enough to alleviate mild pain.

4. Low-dose opioids: Seventy to 90 percent of cancer patients control moderate pain with oral opioids such as Darvon, Percodan, and Percocet. The long-term use of these medications has not been shown to worsen pain. If that should happen in individual cases, the patients may be advised to switch to an opioid other than the one they have been using.

5. Slow-or fast-release opioids: Perhaps the best known of the opioids is morphine, which is sold under several brand names. It’s the most commonly prescribed medication for severe pain and is available in slow-or fast-release forms. Other slow-release opioids, which tend to have longer-lasting effects, include Fentanyl, Levorphanol, methadone, MS Contin, and Oramorph. In the fast-release category are codeine, hydromorphone, and oxycodone. When taken as prescribed, opioids — though quite potent — rarely lead to addiction.

6. Invasive procedures: For acute pain and some chronic pain, a nerve block can provide temporary relief. In this procedure, the physician injects a local anesthetic into or around nerves or below the skin at the site of pain. The anesthetic interrupts the transmission of pain signals to the brain, providing relief for up to several hours. In some instances where drug therapy is ineffective, the pain pathways may be redirected or severed through surgery or controlled with implanted devices.

Reprinted from: When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis by Toni Bernay, PhD, and Saar Porrath, MD (March 2006) © 2006 Toni Bernay, PhD Permission granted by Rodale, Inc., Emmaus, PA 18098. Available wherever books are sold or directly from the publisher by calling (800) 848-4735 or visit their website at http://www.rodalestore.com.

Author

Toni Bernay, Ph.D., is a nationally recognized psychologist and executive coach. She serves as president of the Porrath Foundation for Cancer Patient Advocacy and is a principal in the Leadership Equation Institute, a national consulting firm for executives and entrepreneurs. She resides in Beverly Hills.

Her husband, Saar Porrath, M.D., was a preeminent breast oncologist at the forefront of numerous advances in breast health and care. He established the nationally known Woman’s Breast Center in 1983. For his contributions to health care, he was honored by Los Angeles County, as well as the cities of Los Angeles and Santa Monica.

For more information, please visit http://www.porrathfoundation.org

###







New book Winter in China depicts trials faced by American educator living in China


Somerville, MA (PRWEB) September 17, 2014

“Winter in China: An American Life”, offers the American reader opportunity to travel through sixty years of twentieth century Chinese history, as Robert Winter did in his life there from 1923 to 1987, the year of his death. This is the fascinating story of Winter’s journey through China’s thick and thins, and also of the remarkable circumstances that allowed this story to be told by a biographer who met Winter when the expatriate was already ninety-seven.

Robert Winter is a figure right out of an adventure movie. While teaching in China’s most prestigious universities, he also risked his life in espionage acts under Japanese occupation, and suffered many of the same hardships suffered by Chinese during Mao’s several anti-intellectual campaign. Winter did nothing by half measures, whether it be daring acts of resistance, teaching, painting, gardening, nutrition, or travel to places where few outsiders have traveled. Through it all, though exiled from America, he fought for the highest principles of freedom upon which the United States was founded.

The book is informed by vivid excerpts from Winter’s diary, such as this description of people fleeing outside the city gates of Kunming during Japanese air raids: “Old women with babies strapped on their backs, opium smokers with their pipes, cripples, students with packages of books, house-wives with bound feet clutching a clock to their bosom or some other valuable tied in their person somewhere are all mixed up with the cars of the rich and the trucks belonging to the larger offices.” Reading such scenes against their historical context, the reader will come away with a keen sense of what it was like to live in China during some of the most tumultuous years of its history.

“WINTER IN CHINA”

By Bert Stern

Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006377

Softcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006384

E-Book | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006360

Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Bert Stern pens educator’s determination to make impact on Chinese education

About the Author

Bert Stern is a teacher, poet, writer, and editor is an emeritus professor at Wabash College. He also taught at the University of Thessaloniki and Peking University. He presently leads a program for probationers called Changing Lives Through Literature. Stern has received grants from Fulbright and Lilly Foundations, from the Office of Education for travel and study in India, and from PICAS to study Chinese cultural history at the University of Michigan. His essays and poems have appeared in books, reviews and magazines. He is currently residing at Somerville, Massachusetts.

Xlibris Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider created in 1997 by authors, for authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles. For more information, visit xlibris.com or call 1-888-795-4274 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisPub on Twitter for the latest news.







New book Winter in China depicts trials faced by American educator living in China


Somerville, MA (PRWEB) September 17, 2014

“Winter in China: An American Life”, offers the American reader opportunity to travel through sixty years of twentieth century Chinese history, as Robert Winter did in his life there from 1923 to 1987, the year of his death. This is the fascinating story of Winter’s journey through China’s thick and thins, and also of the remarkable circumstances that allowed this story to be told by a biographer who met Winter when the expatriate was already ninety-seven.

Robert Winter is a figure right out of an adventure movie. While teaching in China’s most prestigious universities, he also risked his life in espionage acts under Japanese occupation, and suffered many of the same hardships suffered by Chinese during Mao’s several anti-intellectual campaign. Winter did nothing by half measures, whether it be daring acts of resistance, teaching, painting, gardening, nutrition, or travel to places where few outsiders have traveled. Through it all, though exiled from America, he fought for the highest principles of freedom upon which the United States was founded.

The book is informed by vivid excerpts from Winter’s diary, such as this description of people fleeing outside the city gates of Kunming during Japanese air raids: “Old women with babies strapped on their backs, opium smokers with their pipes, cripples, students with packages of books, house-wives with bound feet clutching a clock to their bosom or some other valuable tied in their person somewhere are all mixed up with the cars of the rich and the trucks belonging to the larger offices.” Reading such scenes against their historical context, the reader will come away with a keen sense of what it was like to live in China during some of the most tumultuous years of its history.

“WINTER IN CHINA”

By Bert Stern

Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006377

Softcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006384

E-Book | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006360

Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Bert Stern pens educator’s determination to make impact on Chinese education

About the Author

Bert Stern is a teacher, poet, writer, and editor is an emeritus professor at Wabash College. He also taught at the University of Thessaloniki and Peking University. He presently leads a program for probationers called Changing Lives Through Literature. Stern has received grants from Fulbright and Lilly Foundations, from the Office of Education for travel and study in India, and from PICAS to study Chinese cultural history at the University of Michigan. His essays and poems have appeared in books, reviews and magazines. He is currently residing at Somerville, Massachusetts.

Xlibris Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider created in 1997 by authors, for authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles. For more information, visit xlibris.com or call 1-888-795-4274 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisPub on Twitter for the latest news.







New book Winter in China depicts trials faced by American educator living in China


Somerville, MA (PRWEB) September 17, 2014

“Winter in China: An American Life”, offers the American reader opportunity to travel through sixty years of twentieth century Chinese history, as Robert Winter did in his life there from 1923 to 1987, the year of his death. This is the fascinating story of Winter’s journey through China’s thick and thins, and also of the remarkable circumstances that allowed this story to be told by a biographer who met Winter when the expatriate was already ninety-seven.

Robert Winter is a figure right out of an adventure movie. While teaching in China’s most prestigious universities, he also risked his life in espionage acts under Japanese occupation, and suffered many of the same hardships suffered by Chinese during Mao’s several anti-intellectual campaign. Winter did nothing by half measures, whether it be daring acts of resistance, teaching, painting, gardening, nutrition, or travel to places where few outsiders have traveled. Through it all, though exiled from America, he fought for the highest principles of freedom upon which the United States was founded.

The book is informed by vivid excerpts from Winter’s diary, such as this description of people fleeing outside the city gates of Kunming during Japanese air raids: “Old women with babies strapped on their backs, opium smokers with their pipes, cripples, students with packages of books, house-wives with bound feet clutching a clock to their bosom or some other valuable tied in their person somewhere are all mixed up with the cars of the rich and the trucks belonging to the larger offices.” Reading such scenes against their historical context, the reader will come away with a keen sense of what it was like to live in China during some of the most tumultuous years of its history.

“WINTER IN CHINA”

By Bert Stern

Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006377

Softcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006384

E-Book | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006360

Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Bert Stern pens educator’s determination to make impact on Chinese education

About the Author

Bert Stern is a teacher, poet, writer, and editor is an emeritus professor at Wabash College. He also taught at the University of Thessaloniki and Peking University. He presently leads a program for probationers called Changing Lives Through Literature. Stern has received grants from Fulbright and Lilly Foundations, from the Office of Education for travel and study in India, and from PICAS to study Chinese cultural history at the University of Michigan. His essays and poems have appeared in books, reviews and magazines. He is currently residing at Somerville, Massachusetts.

Xlibris Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider created in 1997 by authors, for authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles. For more information, visit xlibris.com or call 1-888-795-4274 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisPub on Twitter for the latest news.







New book Winter in China depicts trials faced by American educator living in China


Somerville, MA (PRWEB) September 17, 2014

“Winter in China: An American Life”, offers the American reader opportunity to travel through sixty years of twentieth century Chinese history, as Robert Winter did in his life there from 1923 to 1987, the year of his death. This is the fascinating story of Winter’s journey through China’s thick and thins, and also of the remarkable circumstances that allowed this story to be told by a biographer who met Winter when the expatriate was already ninety-seven.

Robert Winter is a figure right out of an adventure movie. While teaching in China’s most prestigious universities, he also risked his life in espionage acts under Japanese occupation, and suffered many of the same hardships suffered by Chinese during Mao’s several anti-intellectual campaign. Winter did nothing by half measures, whether it be daring acts of resistance, teaching, painting, gardening, nutrition, or travel to places where few outsiders have traveled. Through it all, though exiled from America, he fought for the highest principles of freedom upon which the United States was founded.

The book is informed by vivid excerpts from Winter’s diary, such as this description of people fleeing outside the city gates of Kunming during Japanese air raids: “Old women with babies strapped on their backs, opium smokers with their pipes, cripples, students with packages of books, house-wives with bound feet clutching a clock to their bosom or some other valuable tied in their person somewhere are all mixed up with the cars of the rich and the trucks belonging to the larger offices.” Reading such scenes against their historical context, the reader will come away with a keen sense of what it was like to live in China during some of the most tumultuous years of its history.

“WINTER IN CHINA”

By Bert Stern

Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006377

Softcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006384

E-Book | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006360

Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Bert Stern pens educator’s determination to make impact on Chinese education

About the Author

Bert Stern is a teacher, poet, writer, and editor is an emeritus professor at Wabash College. He also taught at the University of Thessaloniki and Peking University. He presently leads a program for probationers called Changing Lives Through Literature. Stern has received grants from Fulbright and Lilly Foundations, from the Office of Education for travel and study in India, and from PICAS to study Chinese cultural history at the University of Michigan. His essays and poems have appeared in books, reviews and magazines. He is currently residing at Somerville, Massachusetts.

Xlibris Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider created in 1997 by authors, for authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles. For more information, visit xlibris.com or call 1-888-795-4274 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisPub on Twitter for the latest news.







“When It’s Cancer” Self-Help Book to Take Charge of Cancer

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 16, 2006

A new book “When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis” by Toni Bernay, Ph.D., and Saar Porrath, M.D. provides readers with a practical 10-step program that empowers patients and their loved ones to take charge and be proactive about cancer treatment and care as well as a series of self-assessments, worksheets, and checklists for tracking information to make intelligent, well-reasoned choices. Below you will find an excerpt from the book.

Once your pain management team is in place, you can work together to create a plan that anticipates every level of pain and institutes measures for alleviating it. Remember, the key to effective pain management is early intervention — and that starts with you. You need to inform your team when you’re hurting, where, and how much. This is why being able to talk with them comfortably and candidly is so important. (We’ve provided tools ahead that might help with this conversation.)

As you meet with your team members, you might want to share with them the following pain management model. It establishes a continuum of care to track with pain that ranges from mild to severe.

1. Complementary and alternative therapies: We recommend CAM therapies as a starting point because they are the least toxic. Your body will be exposed to plenty of toxins during cancer treatment; it doesn’t need more. Also, with CAM therapies, you spare your body from the side effects of yet another medication. Acupuncture, chiropractic, hypnosis, massage, and meditation are among the options that have proven successful in controlling pain.

2. Psychotropic drugs: Mediated via neurotransmitters, these medications help manage emotional distresses like depression and anxiety, both of which aggravate pain. Since scientists have determined that neurotransmitters inhabit the entire body, not just the brain, psychotropics have become some of the most frequently prescribed drugs for pain management.

3. Over-the-counter medications: Among the most common OTC pain relievers are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. They may be enough to alleviate mild pain.

4. Low-dose opioids: Seventy to 90 percent of cancer patients control moderate pain with oral opioids such as Darvon, Percodan, and Percocet. The long-term use of these medications has not been shown to worsen pain. If that should happen in individual cases, the patients may be advised to switch to an opioid other than the one they have been using.

5. Slow-or fast-release opioids: Perhaps the best known of the opioids is morphine, which is sold under several brand names. It’s the most commonly prescribed medication for severe pain and is available in slow-or fast-release forms. Other slow-release opioids, which tend to have longer-lasting effects, include Fentanyl, Levorphanol, methadone, MS Contin, and Oramorph. In the fast-release category are codeine, hydromorphone, and oxycodone. When taken as prescribed, opioids — though quite potent — rarely lead to addiction.

6. Invasive procedures: For acute pain and some chronic pain, a nerve block can provide temporary relief. In this procedure, the physician injects a local anesthetic into or around nerves or below the skin at the site of pain. The anesthetic interrupts the transmission of pain signals to the brain, providing relief for up to several hours. In some instances where drug therapy is ineffective, the pain pathways may be redirected or severed through surgery or controlled with implanted devices.

Reprinted from: When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis by Toni Bernay, PhD, and Saar Porrath, MD (March 2006) © 2006 Toni Bernay, PhD Permission granted by Rodale, Inc., Emmaus, PA 18098. Available wherever books are sold or directly from the publisher by calling (800) 848-4735 or visit their website at http://www.rodalestore.com.

Author

Toni Bernay, Ph.D., is a nationally recognized psychologist and executive coach. She serves as president of the Porrath Foundation for Cancer Patient Advocacy and is a principal in the Leadership Equation Institute, a national consulting firm for executives and entrepreneurs. She resides in Beverly Hills.

Her husband, Saar Porrath, M.D., was a preeminent breast oncologist at the forefront of numerous advances in breast health and care. He established the nationally known Woman’s Breast Center in 1983. For his contributions to health care, he was honored by Los Angeles County, as well as the cities of Los Angeles and Santa Monica.

For more information, please visit http://www.porrathfoundation.org

###







“When It’s Cancer” Self-Help Book to Take Charge of Cancer

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 16, 2006

A new book “When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis” by Toni Bernay, Ph.D., and Saar Porrath, M.D. provides readers with a practical 10-step program that empowers patients and their loved ones to take charge and be proactive about cancer treatment and care as well as a series of self-assessments, worksheets, and checklists for tracking information to make intelligent, well-reasoned choices. Below you will find an excerpt from the book.

Once your pain management team is in place, you can work together to create a plan that anticipates every level of pain and institutes measures for alleviating it. Remember, the key to effective pain management is early intervention — and that starts with you. You need to inform your team when you’re hurting, where, and how much. This is why being able to talk with them comfortably and candidly is so important. (We’ve provided tools ahead that might help with this conversation.)

As you meet with your team members, you might want to share with them the following pain management model. It establishes a continuum of care to track with pain that ranges from mild to severe.

1. Complementary and alternative therapies: We recommend CAM therapies as a starting point because they are the least toxic. Your body will be exposed to plenty of toxins during cancer treatment; it doesn’t need more. Also, with CAM therapies, you spare your body from the side effects of yet another medication. Acupuncture, chiropractic, hypnosis, massage, and meditation are among the options that have proven successful in controlling pain.

2. Psychotropic drugs: Mediated via neurotransmitters, these medications help manage emotional distresses like depression and anxiety, both of which aggravate pain. Since scientists have determined that neurotransmitters inhabit the entire body, not just the brain, psychotropics have become some of the most frequently prescribed drugs for pain management.

3. Over-the-counter medications: Among the most common OTC pain relievers are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. They may be enough to alleviate mild pain.

4. Low-dose opioids: Seventy to 90 percent of cancer patients control moderate pain with oral opioids such as Darvon, Percodan, and Percocet. The long-term use of these medications has not been shown to worsen pain. If that should happen in individual cases, the patients may be advised to switch to an opioid other than the one they have been using.

5. Slow-or fast-release opioids: Perhaps the best known of the opioids is morphine, which is sold under several brand names. It’s the most commonly prescribed medication for severe pain and is available in slow-or fast-release forms. Other slow-release opioids, which tend to have longer-lasting effects, include Fentanyl, Levorphanol, methadone, MS Contin, and Oramorph. In the fast-release category are codeine, hydromorphone, and oxycodone. When taken as prescribed, opioids — though quite potent — rarely lead to addiction.

6. Invasive procedures: For acute pain and some chronic pain, a nerve block can provide temporary relief. In this procedure, the physician injects a local anesthetic into or around nerves or below the skin at the site of pain. The anesthetic interrupts the transmission of pain signals to the brain, providing relief for up to several hours. In some instances where drug therapy is ineffective, the pain pathways may be redirected or severed through surgery or controlled with implanted devices.

Reprinted from: When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis by Toni Bernay, PhD, and Saar Porrath, MD (March 2006) © 2006 Toni Bernay, PhD Permission granted by Rodale, Inc., Emmaus, PA 18098. Available wherever books are sold or directly from the publisher by calling (800) 848-4735 or visit their website at http://www.rodalestore.com.

Author

Toni Bernay, Ph.D., is a nationally recognized psychologist and executive coach. She serves as president of the Porrath Foundation for Cancer Patient Advocacy and is a principal in the Leadership Equation Institute, a national consulting firm for executives and entrepreneurs. She resides in Beverly Hills.

Her husband, Saar Porrath, M.D., was a preeminent breast oncologist at the forefront of numerous advances in breast health and care. He established the nationally known Woman’s Breast Center in 1983. For his contributions to health care, he was honored by Los Angeles County, as well as the cities of Los Angeles and Santa Monica.

For more information, please visit http://www.porrathfoundation.org

###







New book Winter in China depicts trials faced by American educator living in China


Somerville, MA (PRWEB) September 17, 2014

“Winter in China: An American Life”, offers the American reader opportunity to travel through sixty years of twentieth century Chinese history, as Robert Winter did in his life there from 1923 to 1987, the year of his death. This is the fascinating story of Winter’s journey through China’s thick and thins, and also of the remarkable circumstances that allowed this story to be told by a biographer who met Winter when the expatriate was already ninety-seven.

Robert Winter is a figure right out of an adventure movie. While teaching in China’s most prestigious universities, he also risked his life in espionage acts under Japanese occupation, and suffered many of the same hardships suffered by Chinese during Mao’s several anti-intellectual campaign. Winter did nothing by half measures, whether it be daring acts of resistance, teaching, painting, gardening, nutrition, or travel to places where few outsiders have traveled. Through it all, though exiled from America, he fought for the highest principles of freedom upon which the United States was founded.

The book is informed by vivid excerpts from Winter’s diary, such as this description of people fleeing outside the city gates of Kunming during Japanese air raids: “Old women with babies strapped on their backs, opium smokers with their pipes, cripples, students with packages of books, house-wives with bound feet clutching a clock to their bosom or some other valuable tied in their person somewhere are all mixed up with the cars of the rich and the trucks belonging to the larger offices.” Reading such scenes against their historical context, the reader will come away with a keen sense of what it was like to live in China during some of the most tumultuous years of its history.

“WINTER IN CHINA”

By Bert Stern

Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006377

Softcover | 6 x 9in | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006384

E-Book | 378 pages | ISBN 9781499006360

Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Bert Stern pens educator’s determination to make impact on Chinese education

About the Author

Bert Stern is a teacher, poet, writer, and editor is an emeritus professor at Wabash College. He also taught at the University of Thessaloniki and Peking University. He presently leads a program for probationers called Changing Lives Through Literature. Stern has received grants from Fulbright and Lilly Foundations, from the Office of Education for travel and study in India, and from PICAS to study Chinese cultural history at the University of Michigan. His essays and poems have appeared in books, reviews and magazines. He is currently residing at Somerville, Massachusetts.

Xlibris Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider created in 1997 by authors, for authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles. For more information, visit xlibris.com or call 1-888-795-4274 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisPub on Twitter for the latest news.







“When It’s Cancer” Self-Help Book to Take Charge of Cancer

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 16, 2006

A new book “When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis” by Toni Bernay, Ph.D., and Saar Porrath, M.D. provides readers with a practical 10-step program that empowers patients and their loved ones to take charge and be proactive about cancer treatment and care as well as a series of self-assessments, worksheets, and checklists for tracking information to make intelligent, well-reasoned choices. Below you will find an excerpt from the book.

Once your pain management team is in place, you can work together to create a plan that anticipates every level of pain and institutes measures for alleviating it. Remember, the key to effective pain management is early intervention — and that starts with you. You need to inform your team when you’re hurting, where, and how much. This is why being able to talk with them comfortably and candidly is so important. (We’ve provided tools ahead that might help with this conversation.)

As you meet with your team members, you might want to share with them the following pain management model. It establishes a continuum of care to track with pain that ranges from mild to severe.

1. Complementary and alternative therapies: We recommend CAM therapies as a starting point because they are the least toxic. Your body will be exposed to plenty of toxins during cancer treatment; it doesn’t need more. Also, with CAM therapies, you spare your body from the side effects of yet another medication. Acupuncture, chiropractic, hypnosis, massage, and meditation are among the options that have proven successful in controlling pain.

2. Psychotropic drugs: Mediated via neurotransmitters, these medications help manage emotional distresses like depression and anxiety, both of which aggravate pain. Since scientists have determined that neurotransmitters inhabit the entire body, not just the brain, psychotropics have become some of the most frequently prescribed drugs for pain management.

3. Over-the-counter medications: Among the most common OTC pain relievers are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. They may be enough to alleviate mild pain.

4. Low-dose opioids: Seventy to 90 percent of cancer patients control moderate pain with oral opioids such as Darvon, Percodan, and Percocet. The long-term use of these medications has not been shown to worsen pain. If that should happen in individual cases, the patients may be advised to switch to an opioid other than the one they have been using.

5. Slow-or fast-release opioids: Perhaps the best known of the opioids is morphine, which is sold under several brand names. It’s the most commonly prescribed medication for severe pain and is available in slow-or fast-release forms. Other slow-release opioids, which tend to have longer-lasting effects, include Fentanyl, Levorphanol, methadone, MS Contin, and Oramorph. In the fast-release category are codeine, hydromorphone, and oxycodone. When taken as prescribed, opioids — though quite potent — rarely lead to addiction.

6. Invasive procedures: For acute pain and some chronic pain, a nerve block can provide temporary relief. In this procedure, the physician injects a local anesthetic into or around nerves or below the skin at the site of pain. The anesthetic interrupts the transmission of pain signals to the brain, providing relief for up to several hours. In some instances where drug therapy is ineffective, the pain pathways may be redirected or severed through surgery or controlled with implanted devices.

Reprinted from: When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis by Toni Bernay, PhD, and Saar Porrath, MD (March 2006) © 2006 Toni Bernay, PhD Permission granted by Rodale, Inc., Emmaus, PA 18098. Available wherever books are sold or directly from the publisher by calling (800) 848-4735 or visit their website at http://www.rodalestore.com.

Author

Toni Bernay, Ph.D., is a nationally recognized psychologist and executive coach. She serves as president of the Porrath Foundation for Cancer Patient Advocacy and is a principal in the Leadership Equation Institute, a national consulting firm for executives and entrepreneurs. She resides in Beverly Hills.

Her husband, Saar Porrath, M.D., was a preeminent breast oncologist at the forefront of numerous advances in breast health and care. He established the nationally known Woman’s Breast Center in 1983. For his contributions to health care, he was honored by Los Angeles County, as well as the cities of Los Angeles and Santa Monica.

For more information, please visit http://www.porrathfoundation.org

###







“When It’s Cancer” Self-Help Book to Take Charge of Cancer

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 16, 2006

A new book “When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis” by Toni Bernay, Ph.D., and Saar Porrath, M.D. provides readers with a practical 10-step program that empowers patients and their loved ones to take charge and be proactive about cancer treatment and care as well as a series of self-assessments, worksheets, and checklists for tracking information to make intelligent, well-reasoned choices. Below you will find an excerpt from the book.

Once your pain management team is in place, you can work together to create a plan that anticipates every level of pain and institutes measures for alleviating it. Remember, the key to effective pain management is early intervention — and that starts with you. You need to inform your team when you’re hurting, where, and how much. This is why being able to talk with them comfortably and candidly is so important. (We’ve provided tools ahead that might help with this conversation.)

As you meet with your team members, you might want to share with them the following pain management model. It establishes a continuum of care to track with pain that ranges from mild to severe.

1. Complementary and alternative therapies: We recommend CAM therapies as a starting point because they are the least toxic. Your body will be exposed to plenty of toxins during cancer treatment; it doesn’t need more. Also, with CAM therapies, you spare your body from the side effects of yet another medication. Acupuncture, chiropractic, hypnosis, massage, and meditation are among the options that have proven successful in controlling pain.

2. Psychotropic drugs: Mediated via neurotransmitters, these medications help manage emotional distresses like depression and anxiety, both of which aggravate pain. Since scientists have determined that neurotransmitters inhabit the entire body, not just the brain, psychotropics have become some of the most frequently prescribed drugs for pain management.

3. Over-the-counter medications: Among the most common OTC pain relievers are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. They may be enough to alleviate mild pain.

4. Low-dose opioids: Seventy to 90 percent of cancer patients control moderate pain with oral opioids such as Darvon, Percodan, and Percocet. The long-term use of these medications has not been shown to worsen pain. If that should happen in individual cases, the patients may be advised to switch to an opioid other than the one they have been using.

5. Slow-or fast-release opioids: Perhaps the best known of the opioids is morphine, which is sold under several brand names. It’s the most commonly prescribed medication for severe pain and is available in slow-or fast-release forms. Other slow-release opioids, which tend to have longer-lasting effects, include Fentanyl, Levorphanol, methadone, MS Contin, and Oramorph. In the fast-release category are codeine, hydromorphone, and oxycodone. When taken as prescribed, opioids — though quite potent — rarely lead to addiction.

6. Invasive procedures: For acute pain and some chronic pain, a nerve block can provide temporary relief. In this procedure, the physician injects a local anesthetic into or around nerves or below the skin at the site of pain. The anesthetic interrupts the transmission of pain signals to the brain, providing relief for up to several hours. In some instances where drug therapy is ineffective, the pain pathways may be redirected or severed through surgery or controlled with implanted devices.

Reprinted from: When It’s Cancer: The 10 Essential Steps to Follow After Your Diagnosis by Toni Bernay, PhD, and Saar Porrath, MD (March 2006) © 2006 Toni Bernay, PhD Permission granted by Rodale, Inc., Emmaus, PA 18098. Available wherever books are sold or directly from the publisher by calling (800) 848-4735 or visit their website at http://www.rodalestore.com.

Author

Toni Bernay, Ph.D., is a nationally recognized psychologist and executive coach. She serves as president of the Porrath Foundation for Cancer Patient Advocacy and is a principal in the Leadership Equation Institute, a national consulting firm for executives and entrepreneurs. She resides in Beverly Hills.

Her husband, Saar Porrath, M.D., was a preeminent breast oncologist at the forefront of numerous advances in breast health and care. He established the nationally known Woman’s Breast Center in 1983. For his contributions to health care, he was honored by Los Angeles County, as well as the cities of Los Angeles and Santa Monica.

For more information, please visit http://www.porrathfoundation.org

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